needs ideas for POSITIVE consequences

Discussion in 'Kindergarten' started by sevenplus, Oct 14, 2008.

  1. sevenplus

    sevenplus Connoisseur

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    Oct 14, 2008

    I feel like I'm being so negative with my students lately. Always calling out the students who are doing things wrong and putting the focus on that instead of what students are doing right.

    So, what POSITIVE things do you do in your class to acknowlege good behavior and kind choices?
     
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  3. DrivingPigeon

    DrivingPigeon Phenom

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    Oct 14, 2008

    I usually just point out good behavior, rather than pointing out negative behavior. "Wow, some of you did an awesome job lining up quietly!" I also have a candyland gameboard up on the front of my desk. I placed a velcro square every 5 spaces and attached a mover (a little polar bear) with velcro. If the class as a whole has a "good day" (we discuss what this means frequently) they move ahead one space. If they have a "bad day" the polar bear doesn't move. During the day I say things like, "If we lined up like this EVERY time, our polar bear would be moving every day!" or "If I keep seeing things like that happen, our polar bear isn't going to be going anywhere."

    So, I don't have any type of individual good behavior incentive. I just try to point out the good behavior ("David just spilled his markers and Megan helped him pick them up. Megan is following our rules to be a helper and be a friend. Great job, Megan!"), but I don't actually give students something for doing good. I just have the whole-class incentive, and verbal recognition for good behavior.
     
  4. sevenplus

    sevenplus Connoisseur

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    Oct 14, 2008

    So what happens when the Polar Bear gets to the candy castle?
     
  5. DrivingPigeon

    DrivingPigeon Phenom

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    Hah, yeah, I left that out. Oops! When he reaches the end, the class votes on something fun. So far I have thought of a movie and popcorn (something short and educational, such as Magic School Bus), an extra recess, extra free choice time, a game in the gym, hat day, etc.
     
  6. NewGirl23

    NewGirl23 Rookie

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    Oct 14, 2008

    I give my kids tickets for following the rules. They write their name on the back and drop it into a bucket. On Mondays I draw one name from the ticket and they get to be the George (Curious George stuffed animal) keeper for the week. George stays in the classroom, but gets to sit on their desk/go to centers with them/and they get to hold him during rest time. I take him home and wash him on the weekend and he is ready to go on Monday. This is a fun (and inexpensive) tool for positive behavior (and it helps them continue to practice writing their name).

    P.S. I use George because my room is decorated in monkeys. You can use whatever your theme is : )
     
  7. kidsalot

    kidsalot Comrade

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    Oct 14, 2008

    I too acknowledge the positive behaviors I see. I use, as a whole group, the stoplight system. I will give my class 15 minutes of extra recess on Wednesdays and Fridays if we don't go below the yellow. If we go to red then they need to work extra hard to stay on green to earn time. If I need to move the marker to yellow I remind the children to stop and think- Is this a time to talk or listen? If it is a time to talk why am I moving the marker(they are too loud). So far it is working. I don't use tangible rewards for individual behaviors - To me this is teaching the children to only follow the rules if they can get something.
     

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