need help for ED/BD classroom

Discussion in 'Special Education Archives' started by jnation, May 5, 2005.

  1. jnation

    jnation Companion

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    May 5, 2005

    Hi Guys! This is my first post on this site. I just found out yesterday that I got a job teaching in an ED/BD self-contained classroom. I am a first year teacher and this classroom has only been up and running for a year now...the teacher who taught the class last year is transferring because she thought the job was too hard. So, naturally, I'm a little nervous and trying to prepare well in advance for any possible scenario. The kids have been reintegrated from the alternative school.
    I was just wondering if you guys could offer any advice or anecdotes about working with this population...i.e. behavior management strategies, classroom ideas, good books to read for information, etc. Any and all help would be much appreciated!
    Thanks in advance!
    Jen
     
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  3. ms. m

    ms. m New Member

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    May 5, 2005

    hey! i have been teaching ei/bd kids for five years now in a day treatment program and i LOVE it!!! :) don't be afraid!!! the kids will see that and run with it! :) just go in, be confident, be respectful, and the most important piece of advice i can give you is to hold the students accountable for their actions. instead of telling them to "please sit down", say something like, "i'll begin when you're ready to listen". instead of saying "don't do that", say something like "students who _______ don't get to ________", or "students who don't _________ get to __________."
    jim faye is an expert on dealing with children. he is the head of the Love and Logic organation. they have a web site and LOTS of great suggestions that really apply to our population of students.
    the fact that you accepted the job with the knowledge that someone ran away from it says a lot about you! i'm sure you'll do fine! stay positive!!!
    if i can help you with anything, please let me know and i'll do my best!!!

    :)
    peace.
    rebecca
     
  4. clarnet73

    clarnet73 Moderator

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    May 5, 2005

    Be consistent... fair, but consistent. Follow through on expectations... expect kids to behave appropriately, do their best, etc. Make it very clear up front what is supposed to happen... you may need to be EXPLICIT on rules and procedures first, until they know you mean business.... but heopefully this won't be as needed once they get used to your routine.

    What age group?
     
  5. Maddi

    Maddi Rookie

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    May 6, 2005

    I have read The Explosive Child and that helped me see things from a new light and intergrate new managment ideas in my room.
     
  6. lisap

    lisap Companion

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    May 9, 2005

    Definately check out some info on Jim Faye - good stuff for any age level. What age are the kids you will be teaching? Is it a self-contained room within a regular school?

    Biggest piece of advise - get to know the kids, what they like, don't like, etc. You will need that when times get tough. It helps to establish a relationship. Also, make sure you are very consistent - hard to do when each student is different and has different circumstances.

    Good luck, I have been teaching LD/ED Resource style and self contained in certain content areas at high school level for almost 10 years.
    Lisa
     
  7. jnation

    jnation Companion

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    May 9, 2005

    Thanks for all the replies! THey have been very helpful.
    The kids are in grades 3-5 and have recently been brought back to the "regular" school from the alternative school. There will be six boys and two teacher's aides. It is a self-contained classroom, the only self-contained class at the school.
    I thought I could give some kind of interest inventory right off the bat to see what they like and don't and develop behavior contracts and a system of rewards based on that.
    I know that they are probably going to need instant reinforcement, especially in the beginning, so I thought I could use some kind of timed reward where if they meet the behavioral requirements of the class and only receive one warning with in a 20-25 minute timeframe, they would receive the reward. I could increase the time requirement as the year progresses.
    My main concern is that I've mainly only ever worked with junior high and high school students, so I don't really know what 3-5th grade boys would like for a reward.
    Thanks for all your help and any other suggestions are greatly appreciated!!
    Jen
     
  8. ms. m

    ms. m New Member

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    May 10, 2005

    boys that age love computers! extra computer time has always been a good carrot in my class! :)
     
  9. jnation

    jnation Companion

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    May 10, 2005

    Thanks!! I will definitely keep that in mind. I think I have three or four computers in my class so this will be perfect.
     
  10. tracieteaches

    tracieteaches Companion

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    May 10, 2005

    The advice given above about getting to know the students and their interests is key to your success. Also, you are definitely on the right track about instant rewards. You will need these maybe all year. (I have taught 6-12th grade alternative school.) I would buy a candy bar and a soda for the Best Behaved Student of the Week and the Most Improved Student of the Week. Food works wonders for this type of student. It gets alittle pricey, but it is cheaper than buying Prozac for you. Also, I would put the incentives on my desk Monday mornings for all to see what would be earned by 2 people on Friday. You can ask that on your interest inventory, "What is your favorite soda and candy bar?" However, I think what helped the most was calling parents EVERY Friday for good or bad. Kids this age are starting to be social (stay over at friend's house, go to movies, etc.) so your call, if you have cooperative parents with phones, can make or break their weekend. If I can help, please let me know. Oh, one more thing--these kids are usually very creative, but don't like to write so do as much as you can orally and through hand-ons projects. Also, they will write when making Power Point Presentations.
     
  11. jnation

    jnation Companion

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    May 10, 2005

    For communication home to parents, I was thinking I could make a parent-teacher journal that would tell the parents what has been going on during the week--good and bad. I would send this home with students on Friday and those that got it signed and returned on Monday would get an extra reward. This way I know that parents will know what is going on at school and they can write or call with concerns. Also, it's teaching the students responsibility by having to bring the notebook back and forth.
    I really liked the idea about giving a "most improved award" and "best behaved" on Friday. Thanks for the ideas and let me know how you think the journal will work or if there are any other suggestions!
     

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