Need Hands On reading and math activities

Discussion in 'Elementary Education Archives' started by camcdade, Jun 21, 2005.

  1. camcdade

    camcdade Comrade

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    Jun 21, 2005

    Hi! I will be teaching summer school for third grade in July. We've been told not to use paper and pencil activities (worksheets), but rather to plan hands on activities with manipulatives, etc. The focus is on increasing reading comprehension and mastery of basic third grade math skills. Any interactive ideas? Thanks!
     
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  3. hescollin

    hescollin Fanatic

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    Jun 22, 2005

    Petunia

    Buy a beach ball at the Dollar Store and mark off sections. Write math facts in the sections. Use add, sub, times, write across, up and down and etc. Or make one ball for addition, another for multiplication and etc. Students stand in a circle and toss ball to one another. Where ever the right thumb is when the catcher catches the ball, they say the fact and answer and toss to another player and sit down until all players have a chance to catch and answer. My two best rewards are STICKERS, stickers and more stickers. And gumballs from a gumball machine. Buy at the Dollar Store cheap. Have a great summer school session.
     
  4. cinmcl61

    cinmcl61 Rookie

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    Jun 22, 2005

    You can use that beach ball for reading too. I have one that says tell me the characters, setting, what was your favorite part, what happened at the beginning, middle and end. I got it at a teacher supply store. Also for reading is a literature circle - reading and then very interactice since the kids take over the lesson. Good luck and have fun
     
  5. Missy

    Missy Aficionado

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    Jun 22, 2005

    For reading I would suggest using reader's theatre; there are lots of scripts out there, but it is easy to make your own. Pick an interesting section of a story or book you have all read; make copies for every student and assign parts ( I sometimes have more than 1 narrator if it is a large part). Depending on the students you can highlight their part, or have them figure out which character says what (good review of dialogue and quotation marks). I usually skip costumes, but may do simple props and the kids can draw a background on large chart paper.
    For math you could come up with simple to make center activities: area restaurant menus and play money, etc. I also like card games to review math concepts - MegaFun Card Game Math by Scholastic is good.
     
  6. mochasmom

    mochasmom New Member

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    Jun 22, 2005

    Word Study

    I have started a word study program in my resource program. I work with students of all levels, and this program allows differentiating. I used the books, Words Their Way , and All Sorts of Sorts , for developing my program. Depending on the level of the students, I have students working on beginning/ending sounds, blends, digraphs, prefixes, suffixes, etc. Each student has a spiral notebook that they do their written activities in. I have different activities that they can choose from: sentences, pictures to illustrate the word, definitions, parts of speech, synonyms, etc. I can give you more specifics if you want. e-mail me directly-
     
  7. Steph-ernie

    Steph-ernie Groupie

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    Jun 22, 2005

    I made some fun math manipulatives when I was student teaching. I took different colored paper circles and glued them to the top of popsicle sticks. Then, I wrote a number on each one. The students love using these because they are a little something different. (They kind of look like lolipops). They can be used for all sorts of math activities. I usually have the students sit in a circle so they can be easily passed around, and then have them use them for any sort of activity. Saying whether the number is prime or composite, coming up with math problems with this as the answer (use any operation), is the number even or odd, etc. They really liven up regular math practice.
     
  8. camcdade

    camcdade Comrade

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    Jun 23, 2005

    Thanks Steph! I can definitely use that idea!!
    Keep the great ideas coming everyone!!
     
  9. lowrie

    lowrie Companion

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    Jun 23, 2005

    I did a unit on measurement in my grade three class for student teaching this year and I used these ideas from PBS online:

    Bubble Mania: Students are given opportunities to practice measurement skills as they examine a soap bubble print. Students follow a recipe to make a soap bubble solution. They use the soapy solution to blow large bubbles with a plastic drinking straw until they pop leaving behind a circular print. Students find the diameter, circumference, and area of the bubble print.

    and

    It Takes Ten: Students review the importance and use of standard units of measure. The basic units of metric measure are reinforced in a song titled, "It Takes Ten". Students are immersed in activity based learning as they move from station to station estimating and measuring length, volume, weight, and area. At each station students first estimate, measure, and then compute the difference between the two. They estimate and measure marbles to the nearest gram and squeeze water-saturated sponges to practice measuring in milliliters. Students practice linear measurement estimation skills by throwing cotton balls and rolling toy cars. Students determine if they are a square or a rectangle by measuring and comparing arm span and height. Finally, each student determines the area of his/her foot by counting and computing the area by constructing a rectangle to approximate the area.

    These were great fun and we had a blast doing them!

    Hope these help :)
     
  10. CanadianTeacher

    CanadianTeacher Groupie

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    Jun 23, 2005

    For measurement, I had my grade 3 students go outside in groups with metre sticks and measure the perimeter of things outside, be it fence sections, wood divider surrounding play structures, hopscotch outline on cement, etc... Theyt had to take the measurements of each individual side and then show the number sentence to figure out the perimeter. When they came in they worked with their measurements to also find the area.

    Something else I did was pair up students and give them each a longish section of ribbon or string. In pairs they had to decide on their estimation of the length of the ribbon/string and then we recorded each pair's estimation on the board. Then they had to actually measure it and compare the measurement with their estimation. They really enjoyed that one too. There was a bit of a competitive edge to see who's estimation was closest that helped to make things interesting.
     
  11. mochasmom

    mochasmom New Member

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    Jun 23, 2005

    Thanks so much!
     
  12. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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  13. mochasmom

    mochasmom New Member

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    Jun 25, 2005

    Thanks so much. The sites look really good. I've never come across them before. The Apple one actually has the Candy box lesson that I decided to do, so I'm going to look over the site when I have some free time.
     
  14. camcdade

    camcdade Comrade

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    Jun 25, 2005

    Thanks for the ideas everyone. I know it is much easier to think of manipulatives to use in an interactive math lesson. But, what about reading? I have the comprehension beach balls already. Does anyone have other reading activities that are not pencil and paper driven? I need to focus on reading comprehension skills like main idea, summary, understanding plot, etc. Thanks!
     
  15. teacher333

    teacher333 Devotee

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    Jun 25, 2005

    What about murals for the walls, on large sheets of butcher block paper, in which each group is responsible for retelling parts of the stories they are reading, using paints and markers to draw the pictures and write the words? This way they are working as a group, planning what they are going to do, your students with writing strengths will be writing and the artists in the group will be drawing.
     
  16. camcdade

    camcdade Comrade

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    Jun 26, 2005

    I like that! thanks!
     
  17. lovinteach

    lovinteach Rookie

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    Jun 27, 2005

    For reading you can make panel boards. These do involve paper and pencil but they are fun and review all of the main parts of the story. You fold a large sheet of white paper so that there are 8 squares. The students then following the following format, drawing a detailed picture and writing a summary of each:

    1. Title of novel, rewritten by
    2. Characters
    3. Setting
    4. Situation before the problem
    5. Problem
    6. Climax
    7. Solution
    8. Ending

    I think that is how it goes. They usually turn out very good and it is good to use instead of a paper and pencil test. I make a rubric and use that as my test grade since it reviews all of the main parts of the novel. They turn out very polished!! Hope this helps you out some. Good luck!!
     
  18. teacher333

    teacher333 Devotee

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    Jun 27, 2005

    I have also done Story Kites, from large sheets of white paper, cut in diamond-shaped kites, then folded first lengthwise and then sideways. You can choose whatever 4 things you want to work on for that particular story, i.e. characters, sequencing, narrative elements, etc., and students can either draw or just write their responses. For those that would prefer and if you have access to a computer, you might have those who do better on the computer.
     
  19. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Jun 27, 2005

    I got this from someone at AtoZ and kept it in a Word document.

    BOOK REPORT IDEAS We send this list home to parents the first day of school. And have extra copies for parent conference, because one or two will ask for another copy. Have it ready to hand to them at that time.

    1. Make a book jacket depicting the characters, setting and theme of your book. Put a short summary on the inside flap.
    2. Use photographs and captions to make a family album or scrapbook.
    3. Make a home movie or filmstrip.
    4. Make a comic strip.
    5. Make a colorful illustrated time line or map for historical books.
    6. Construct a mobile
    7. Construct a diorama
    8. Design a set of T-shirts to suit the characters.
    9. Make a clay, soap, wood, or plaster models.
    10. Make a colletion or keepsake box of souvenirs from the story.
    11. Make a mural
    12. Give a flannel board talk
    13. Make a bulletin board
    14. Construct a jigsaw puzzle based on the book
    15. Design a coloring book around the characters and events.
    16. Make a board game
    17. Make a series (3 or more) of bookmarks representing your book
    18. Make a word search or crossword puzzle
    19. Make a wanted poster for an appropriate character.
    20. Make a family tree.
    21. Write a book review
    22. Write a movie script for part of the book
    23. Write a different ending
    24. Write a letter to a friend to recommend the book
    25. Write a letter to the author of a favorite book. If possible, mail the letter to the author in care of the publisher. Wait for an exciting reply.
    26. Write a letter to the editor of one of the many juvenile magazines about your favorite book. You might be lucky enough to get it published!
    27. Think up a new adventure, incident or experiene to add to the book.
    28. Make a newspaper. Include events that could have occurred when and where the story took place.
    29. Develop a dictionary for a character in the book. It should include words that he or she particularly liked to use as well as definitions that character would have given the words.
    30. Write lost and found columns for objects and people in the book
    31. Write a series of letters or postcards from one character to another.
    32. Write a series of "Dear Abby" letters from characters. Answer with your advice.
    33. Write several diary entries for the main characters.
    34. Make a test (with answer key for the other students to take)
    35. Conduct an interview between the author and characters, between you and a character, or between two characters.
    36. Make a nomination speech for your book for either the Caldecott or Newbery Award.
    37. Dress as one the characters and tell about yourself or tell about the other characters from your point of view. Be the voice of your character!
    38. Produce a quiz show involving several students who have read the same book.
    39. Give a video presentation of the book
    40. Create a puppet show using stick, finger, glove or hand puppets
    41. Hold a panel discussion or debate when several students have read the same book
    42. Retell the story to a group of younger children
    43. Make a movie of your book using a series of 10 pictures. Attach to paper towel rolls. Tell the story as you show the pictures.
    44. Dress dolls to show characters from your book
    45. Act out the story: several students read the same story and work together
    46 Give an oral summary of the book
    47 Compare two books on the same subject: two books on different subjects; or two books by the same author
    48. Share books about how to make or do things either by oral demonstrations or written directions.
    49. Give a sales talk. Act as a salesman trying to convince the class to read the book
    50. Find information on the author to share with the class
    51. Write a short story about what you would have done if you were one of the characters in the story.
    52. Share books of poetry by:
    ---------Choral reading
    ---------Writing a poem of your own
    ---------Acting out poetry
    ---------Accompanying the poem with various rhythmic activities
    ---------Setting a verse to music
    ---------Adding additional stanzas to your favorite poems.
     
  20. lowrie

    lowrie Companion

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    Jun 28, 2005

    Upsadaisy, those are great!! My oldest son is finishing Grade 8 this week and they did a book report in the form of a book jacket -- the nice thing about these activities is you can move them up and down the age levels :)
     
  21. camcdade

    camcdade Comrade

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    Jun 30, 2005

    The story kite idea is perfect...thanks!

    Keep 'em coming!
    :D
     

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