Need Behaviour Assignments for Consequences

Discussion in 'Behavior Management' started by dannyteach, Dec 6, 2010.

  1. dannyteach

    dannyteach New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2010
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 6, 2010

    I'm looking for some help! I am in my 7th year of teaching and have a little guy in my grade 7 class this year. I taught him last year and was blessed with his sweet return to my class list this year. He is the most disruptive, disrespectful, high energy child I have yet to come across. am usually the teacher who invites challenges like this into my class...however this littleguy has got me, my principal, the admin beat! I am looking for support and help in ways to deal with him when he gets into his distructive states.

    I would like to come up with assignments for him to do that address his poor behaviour choices in class / on the playground. For example, if he swears at a teacher or pretends to shoot his classmates consistantly, having him write a journal entry from his teacher's perspective or classmates on what they may be feeling. Having him do a behavioural report when sent out of the classroom to reflect on his behaviours.

    I would like to come up with 10 or so behavior related assignments for him to do in the office when he is not ready to be in class. These can be kept with the principal and he must complete one before being permitted to return to class.

    Any ideas for assignments? reports? projects? readings? etc. It would be very much appreciated! I need to somehow survive this child this year and it is only December!!!

    Thanks!
    Danielle
     
  2.  
  3. StellatheSub

    StellatheSub Rookie

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2010
    Messages:
    31
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 8, 2010

    Age 7 or grade 7?
     
  4. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2006
    Messages:
    27,640
    Likes Received:
    1

    Dec 8, 2010

    Hi Danielle, and welcome!

    I'm guessing 7th grade. And I've got to be honest and admit that I'm in a bit over my head; my typical "not bad enough for detention" assignment is to multiply your phone number by your zip code. The next time you stay after, you have to check it by long division. I tend not to have too many repeat offenders.

    How about an essay on the meaning of "respect", starting with a dictionary definition? Likewise "Civility" and "Cooperation"???
     
  5. Cerek

    Cerek Aficionado

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2009
    Messages:
    3,108
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 8, 2010

    The writing assignments sound like a good idea, because it will force him to actually THINK about what he is doing and how it affects other people. Having him describe his actions from the other person's POV might make him think about the impact his actions are having. I also like Alice's idea of writing a short paper on respect, civility, cooperation, etc by beginning with the dictionary definition.

    Other ideas for writing assignments could be:
    1) Describe a typical school day from the time you wake up till you go to bed that night. Write about the things that happen on a normal day for you. (This might provide some insight from HIS POV about why he is so out of control. What is triggering all of that anger and disruption?)

    2) List the name of 10 classmates and write one good quality or positive comment about each one. How does the person display this quality? What is unique about him/her? What affect (if any) does this quality or attribute have on other classmates? (Perhaps if he lists positive qualities of others and how it affects the classroom environment, he will begin to think about how some of those qualities or behaviors would work for him. You could also do this assignment several times, making him list 10 different classmates each time until he has eventually written one positive comment about each of them).

    3) What do you want to do when you are grown and out of school? What kind of job do you think you would like to have? (hopefully, this will make him think about future goals and help him start focusing on what he needs to do to reach them).

    4) If you had 1 day to do whatever you wanted, what would you do? (if he writes something like "play video games all day" or "sit around the house", then future assignments can focus more on describing a favorite hobby or activity OTHER than video games. Try to make him think of something that requires some energy and thought and describe what he enjoys most about that activity)

    5) Imagine YOU are a middle school teacher. Describe what you think a normal day of school would be like for you then. What subject would you teach? What kind of lessons would you do? How would you make the lessons interesting for all the students? How much time do you think it would take to grade all the papers from every class you have?

    Those are some ideas off the top of my head. I'm not sure how much success you will actually have getting him to do any of these, but once he is removed from the situation that is upsetting him and has some time to calm down, maybe he will begin to reflect on these ideas and how he can use them to change his behavior. If he DOES complete the assignments, he will have been forced to think about his actions (and their impact) a little more deeply and will also provide insight to you about what is triggering these reactions and things he wishes were different about his environment.
     
  6. teacher12345

    teacher12345 Cohort

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2010
    Messages:
    536
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 8, 2010

    Some other assignment ideas:

    1. Writing a letter of apology to the teacher stating what he did, why it was not acceptable, how his actions impacted others, others point of view and what others think of him when he acts this way, how it makes his teacher feel when he acts this way, and what he could do next time instead.

    2. Comparing and Contrasting his behavior with that of other students in his grade or class: IE: Other 7th graders treat their teachers with respect and use respectful words when talking with them, and I sweared at my teacher and then stating what other people may think of him if he keeps doing this behavior, ie: dissruptive, obnoxious, rude, don't want to be around him, direspectful, disobedient, defient, weird, goofs off alot, can't listen and follow directions, annoying to be around etc.

    3. Write the following words and their defenitions from the dictionary 3 times each and use them in a sentence; cooperative/cooperate/cooperating, respectful, responsible, polite, curtious, rude, defient, and obnoxious.

    4. Make a list of why his behavior was not appropriate: EX: it was disruptive, rude, not respecting teacher or peers trying to learn/teach, spoke out of turn, bad language, others were mad, etc.

    5. Cause and Effect note cards: given a situation or behavior he will write down the effect

    6. he will write a poem about how his behavior effected others/other people's point of view, teacher's point of view

    7. He will write a diary entry as if he was the teacher and had a disrespectful, rude, uncooperative student in his classroom, stating why it was annoying, what the student did, why it made it hard for him to teach etc.

    8. Write a diary entry as if he was a classmate of a student who acted like he did, disrespectful, rude, etc.
     
  7. paperheart

    paperheart Groupie

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2005
    Messages:
    1,351
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 11, 2010

    Name 50 careers that require a college education.

    Name 50 reasons that explain why you are bright, beautiful and just plain awesome.

    Imagine you are a superhero. Name 50 super powers you would like to have. Now describe 10 qualities you do have that can lead to good.
     
  8. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2006
    Messages:
    27,640
    Likes Received:
    1

    Dec 12, 2010

    Some of these sound downright fun!

    Detention in my school involves copying, word for word, a page of typed print. The last time I had detention duty, it concerned Brown vs the Board of Education.

    It used to be copying a page from the dictionay.

    Saturday detention is copying the Constitution.

    As you decide on the assignments, keep in mind: the point is that it's NOT fun. It's something to be avoided.
     
  9. Pisces_Fish

    Pisces_Fish Fanatic

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2006
    Messages:
    2,740
    Likes Received:
    1

    Dec 12, 2010

    I'll agree with Alice that some of these sound fun, but having him write 50 good qualities he has might be a good thing...it shows him that his teachers believe in him and that they are focusing on his good side. This could turn into more positive behavior from him. If he's praised for showing good behavior, he may be more apt to behave, since he's probably doing a lot of it for attention.
     
  10. swansong1

    swansong1 Maven

    Joined:
    May 19, 2007
    Messages:
    5,452
    Likes Received:
    221

    Dec 12, 2010

    Here's my opinion as an ESE teacher: The children that Alice gives detention to are normal children with normal behaviors that have transgressed a little. Therefore, her punishment is absolutely acceptable. This 7th grader exhibits unusual and abnormal behavior ( as in a child with behavioral disabilities). He needs to have behavioral modification strategies to help him learn more acceptable behaviors in school. So, the writing assignments you all have suggested would act as behavioral modification strategies and would be be a good start for him to begin learning ways to change his behavior. I'm guessing he will not find these writing assignments easy. As a matter of fact, the fact that he will have to sit quietly and give some thought to his actions and then compose a response will give him difficulty because he has shown that those types of activities are not something he can handle easily..
     
  11. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2006
    Messages:
    27,640
    Likes Received:
    1

    Dec 12, 2010

    Excellent point swan!
     
  12. Teacherella

    Teacherella Habitué

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2006
    Messages:
    769
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 10, 2011

    Whatever consequence you decide on, I would make sure that it won't make him hate writing. It would be a shame for him to associate writing as a punishment. I like the idea of him listing 50 positive traits about himself and maybe have him choose one to write about. I'm a firm believer in giving students logical consequences so I think it should directly relate to whatever reason he was send down to the office.
     
  13. MamaFisch

    MamaFisch New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2011
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0

    Mar 7, 2011

    I have several specially selected sections from our student code of conduct. Students have to copy it. If it is a short selection, I have them copy it several times and then I send home the page, with a note from me, to be signed by their parent.

    On our campus, three minor offenses that are documented and addressed result in a referral, so this also provides documentation and proof of parent notification.

    I also have students who make messes stay to clean up. Writing on desks and walls means erasing marks in the hallway. Students who run in the hall have to do 20 walking laps from one end of the hallway to the other, etc.
     
  14. sidhewing

    sidhewing Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2011
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    0

    Mar 11, 2011

    Personal Responsibility Grade

    I believe in the "personal responsibility grade." I would suggest to give this to the whole class. It's a form that grades students on their behavior and is generally 15-20% of their overall grade. Each week you grades students on tardiness, absences, participation and respectful behavior. Allow yourself 2-3 sentences if they did something really disrespectful like curse, hurt a student etc. AND then allow them a space to "agree" or "disagree" with your grade and a space that allows them to answer: What could I do in the future to improve my grade?
    I've found that it is surprisingly effective and students sometimes are chillingly honest.

    If you don't want to do that have you considered a Behavior plan? Where you sit down with the students and together your brain storm was is disruptive/ productive and what the consequences/ rewards are?

    Or what about a progress chart where it's just between you and the student? So, that the students won't be embarrassed in front of his friends?

    Good luck!!
     
  15. m1trLG2

    m1trLG2 Companion

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2011
    Messages:
    102
    Likes Received:
    0

    Apr 17, 2011

    How are mom and dad?

    Here are some things we did in treatment as well as somethings I have used in the classroom.

    1) Have him write a letter home to his parent that gets signed about his behavior. Do this in a guided writing style. "Dear Mom and Dad I was very disrespectful today. I made the choice to _______." Get it signed and returned (more effective if mom and dad are involved though).

    2) Do "SODAS" with him as part of his journaling.

    S- Situation
    O- Options
    D- Disadvantages
    A- Advantages
    S- Solution

    Here is what it would look like:
    S- I want to color instead of do the work I'm supposed to do.
    O- Do my work or chose to color.
    D- If I chose to color my teacher will get upset, send a letter home, mom and dad will get upset, I will spend the rest of my day arguing. If I chose to do my work I don't get to do what I want and that upsets me.

    A- If I chose to do my work, perhaps I will finish early and be allowed to color and have some free time. My parents won't be upset, and my teacher won't get upset. If I chose to color, I get to do what I want.

    S- I think I will do my work and then color later and that way I don't have to deal with the upset people.

    This can be something he is allowed to do if he can recognize himself "losing control" it's a "stop and think" method. However it can also be used afterwards and then the solution would be the one he picked but why it didn't work out would be made clear in disadvantages.

    3) This isn't a "punishment" but can be effective for helping to change behavior. A lot of behavior kids get overwhelmed very quickly and again need to "stop and think". Have him "take a break". This is good for ALL kids but mostly get utilized by behavioral kids. If he is being crazy and hyper and defiant tell him, "I think you need to take a break, please go have a seat facing the wall in the break chair." Give him 5 minutes and then ask him to join you OR tell him, "when you think you can make better choices let me know and you can join us" but if it's over five minutes have him make up the time during recess or with an assignment or something. This way he doesn't just go back to a corner and play. Sometimes these kids just get stuck in a loop and honestly don't know how to get out.

    4) Have him do "self awareness" worksheets. Now, prior to teaching I was a behavioral therapist and I am a supporter of the cognitive behavioral school of thought. So, feel free to disagree I just wanted to say this is from that standpoint.

    A lot of behavioral kids are unable to put themselves in another person's shoes. This kid may be able to write a great response of how it would "feel" to be a teacher dealing with a kid like him but he doesn't "feel" that. He has observed your behaviors and listened and knows what to say. Giving assignments that require introspection will be more effective at changing his behaviors. Here are a few links.

    http://www.box.net/shared/fp9tziylhr

    http://www.stressgroup.com/ABCworksheet.html

    http://practicegroundprojects.wetpaint.com/page/Handouts,+Protocols+&+Client+Learning+Activities

    These are all similar to the SODAS approach and designed to have the child look inside to assess behaviors and slow down... again Stop and Think.

    If you google "Behavioral Therapy Worksheets" you will find lots of things he can work on.

    Also, ask the school guidance counselor if she/he has anything like these worksheets that he could work on.

    Lots of times the behavior is impulsive and there is no reason the child did it. So, the solution is learning to recognize impulsive behavior and then be able to stop and take charge of it.

    Hope some of this helps!
     

Share This Page

test