NC teachers- I'm sorry your new pay scale isn't much better

Discussion in 'General Education' started by giraffe326, Aug 7, 2014.

  1. lilia123

    lilia123 Companion

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    Aug 8, 2014

    I guess on one positive note my district came out with the new salary supplement schedule. (we get a flat rate amount based on years of experience instead of percentage like most counties). Teachers with 15 or more years of experience had their local supplement raised to replace their lose in longevity pay. Hopefully, more districts will do the same to keep their veteran teachers.
     
  2. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    Aug 8, 2014

    That's really nice to hear! I don't have much faith in my district. They've tried to shaft us several times lately. I'll keep my fingers crossed though!
     
  3. LiterallyLisa

    LiterallyLisa Companion

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    Aug 8, 2014

    I am appreciative, all throughout my education, teachers tried to tell me how bad the pay was---but looking at a number like 30,000, to a first time job seeker that sounded pretty awesome.

    But here I am, student loans, bills, $700 rent, insurance, car payment. My bf and I want to start saving for a house....but I barely have any left to put towards my savings each month.


    We are finally getting a supplement...for math and science teachers.
     
  4. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    Aug 8, 2014


    The supplement is from your district?

    How do the rest of the teachers feel about that? Is it just for new hires or do the current math and science teachers get it too?
     
  5. Mrs.DLC

    Mrs.DLC Comrade

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    Aug 8, 2014

    It's sad

    Some districts in FL (mine included)pay close to NC.I didn't realize that until I saw the scale........and COL isn't great here, either. So many teachers in high paying districts don't realize that a lot of us don't make "those" salaries. Also, we usually have less benefits at a higher cost. I was surprised at how many teachers still get free insurance, etc. when it comes up on teacher forums. Nice perk. ( I had that when I taught in another state.)
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2014
  6. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Aug 8, 2014

    I make more (significantly more) than those with a doctorate at top step.:huh:
     
  7. LiterallyLisa

    LiterallyLisa Companion

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    Aug 8, 2014

    I went back and looked at what I had read and it is a sign on bonus for science and math teachers...

    The middle school has a hard time getting people to even come in and interview for positions (I didn't apply, I was contacted.) I think they hired 13 teachers last year, and one left a couple months in so they hired someone else. Five of those teachers resigned at the end of the year, that I know of. That doesn't include teachers that have been there awhile and resigned this year.

    Instead of a sign on bonus, they should have a staying on bonus!

    I know that conditions are the same or worse in other districts.
     
  8. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    As a science teacher who is on her second career, I get a bit irritated with the signing bonuses. The idea that a brand new teacher, that I'm sure admin will want me to mentor in some way, will get extra money than I do is frustrating. Especially since it isn't something that will be drawing these teachers away from another career. They'd have to have (at least in my area) two years of preparation to get the job. They were already going to be teaching, regardless of the bonus.

    If that frustrates me, I can only imagine how frustrating it would be to an English or History teacher.
     
  9. PowerTeacher

    PowerTeacher Comrade

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    Aug 8, 2014

    Ooooh, yeah! They reduced our top end pay by $3000 a year, and while all other state employees kept their longevity pay, they took ours away, and are giving it back to us incrementally as part of our "raise". After 25 years until the end of your career there are NO raises.
     
  10. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    Aug 8, 2014

    Our raises stop after 30 years. Many people teach for five years after that because your retirement is based on your salary for your previous five years of teaching.
     
  11. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    Aug 8, 2014

    Here, you move up the scale pretty quickly, but after 10-15 years, you are stuck unless you add graduate credits. There is longevity pay in most district, but you are still frozen. It stinks to be topped out, but in the long run, you make more money than you would if you gradually went up the scale, so I'm OK with it. (For example, you'd earn the top pay ($50,000 in NC) for years 11+ instead of taking 30 years to get there. Sure you'd be stuck until a COL adjustment came up, but lifetime you earn a lot more!)
     
  12. karebear76

    karebear76 Habitué

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    Aug 8, 2014

    I'm completely counting my blessings that I don't teach in NC. Such a shame that our profession is not esteemed enough to make it worth doing financially for your whole life.

    We are still district based with salaries so there is a great deal of difference in pay scales. I'd take at least a $10,000/year pay cut to teach in my district of residence as opposed to the one which is 37 miles one way.
     
  13. abat_jour

    abat_jour Companion

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    Aug 9, 2014

    I did my internship (understand I was at the school a full year...1300+ hours, more than some of the paid teachers who have to follow curriculum binders aka photocopy a district mandated graphic organizer each day) in a very high paying district with benefits you couldnt even imagine existed - a school/district/city that pretty much creates the negative stereotypes of teachers. And now I hold a job at a lower paying, by far, school with no unions. And....my new school with low pay is a FAR more upbeat/dedicated with more caring teachers, admin etc. I love going there and working with staff and focusing on the students. I will never make enough money to lead the modest live I imagined myself creating for myself but I smile all day. BUT I do think the way education is treated is wrong....go to a big district it is all spent on consultants and other bs. People got too selfish and messed it up imo.
     

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