MO teachers - Right to Work

Discussion in 'General Education' started by JimG, Jan 2, 2018.

  1. JimG

    JimG Companion

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2017
    Messages:
    170
    Likes Received:
    65

    Jan 2, 2018

    With Missouri Right to Work going through in 2017, I have never quite understood if it will affect the Missouri State Teachers Association (MSTA) or the Public School Retirement System (PSRS).

    At each district I have been in in the Ozarks, teachers have NOT been required to join a union. However, most do indeed join MSTA for the $2 million in liability coverage, if nothing else. Are other districts normally similar? If so, I would not foresee MSTA being affected greatly since it is voluntary.

    For PSRS, all teachers automatically get 13% of their paycheck redirected into this pension program. Does this have anything to do with unions and Right to Work, or is it non-related and therefore safe?

    I am looking forward to voting on Right to Work this year. Though Governor Greitens signed it into law in 2017, enough signatures were collected to put it to the vote of the people in this 2018 election.
     
  2.  
  3. tchr4vr

    tchr4vr Companion

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2015
    Messages:
    137
    Likes Received:
    82

    Jan 2, 2018

    My state is a right to work state and we still have our state retirement system, as well as teacher's associations. Nothing changed from when I left NY, which was a union state. I have always been anti-union, so I don't see a problem with it.
     
    Backroads likes this.
  4. Tyler B.

    Tyler B. Devotee

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2012
    Messages:
    1,186
    Likes Received:
    385

    Jan 2, 2018

    I hope Missouri voters can get the right-to-work law changed. The law is aimed at busting unions. No one can be forced to join a union in any state, but this law weakens unions and the ability of teachers to pressure the state on wages, benefits and teaching issues like class size.

    Not surprisingly, right-to-work laws lower wages—for both union and nonunion workers alike. These laws also decrease the chances of employees getting either health insurance or pensions through their jobs— again, for both union and nonunion workers.

    I see right-to-work laws as a slam against the middle class. Good luck getting rid of it.
     
  5. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2014
    Messages:
    1,558
    Likes Received:
    477

    Jan 2, 2018

    13%, that rate is horrible. That’s why I like working at a private school — I’m not bashing public schools, just stating my preference. They don’t take out money each pay period for retirement if you tell them not to and you can instead use the money to invest, which is what I’m doing and have been. In fact, one of the things I’m putting money in is a Roth IRA every year up to the max (currently $5,500). By the time I reach retirement age, I’ll have over $1 million saved in just the Roth IRA, not including my other investments. And when I finally retire I can collect Social Security and Medicare in addition to my pension through my numerous investments. Public schoolteachers can’t do this because they don’t pay into SS. They can this double-dipping.

    This is why I wouldn’t ever work in a red state. They have an unhealthy disdain for teachers and compensate them very poorly. I’m so sorry you have to deal with this... :(
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2018
  6. JimG

    JimG Companion

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2017
    Messages:
    170
    Likes Received:
    65

    Jan 2, 2018

    Admittedly, 13% was a shock when I saw it on my first paycheck. The trade-off is we can retire after thirty years teaching, and we get the average of our three highest years’ earnings each year for life. We also do not have to pay into Social Security. So ideally, I will be able to retire from teaching when I am 52. At that time, even if I move onto teaching in a private school, at a college, or in a different state, I will still get that pension.
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2018
  7. JimG

    JimG Companion

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2017
    Messages:
    170
    Likes Received:
    65

    Jan 2, 2018

    What kind of retirement system exists for public school teachers where you are at (California, right?)? Additionally, private school teachers tend to get paid less and have fewer benefits than public school teachers in this area. Is that the case in your region?
     
  8. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2014
    Messages:
    1,558
    Likes Received:
    477

    Jan 2, 2018

    Not at my private school. It is one of the highest ranked schools in all of California and one of the best paying. I currently make 55k/year, am a 4th-year teacher, and get a $5,000 raise annually. It will max out at 100k in year 13. (BTW, I have a Masters + 5.) Plus, my healthcare is 100% covered by my employer and they pay 90% for vision and dental — I pay less than $40/month in total for the both of those. Our retirement plan is so-so, as my employer only matches 1-3%. This is why I do all the investments myself. And because I work at a private school, I am allowed to solicit students for private tutoring. This enables me to make about half my teaching salary (27k) — at the moment I make 82k gross. In two years, I will make six figures with my tutoring money and so I love my school, haha! Another thing my school does which I love is that they gift us money every year before Christmas Break and Summer Break ($1,000). They are the best!

    California uses a retirement system called CalSTRS for public school teachers. Here is an article that explains it pretty well:

    https://ed100.org/lessons/pensions
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2018
  9. JimG

    JimG Companion

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2017
    Messages:
    170
    Likes Received:
    65

    Jan 2, 2018

    Sounds like yo have got a good thing going for you. Keep it up!
     
    futuremathsprof likes this.
  10. TrademarkTer

    TrademarkTer Habitué

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2017
    Messages:
    996
    Likes Received:
    646

    Jan 2, 2018

    Public school teachers absolutely pay into social security!!! Where did you get this idea?

    My last check I paid $230 into TPAF (pension system), $185 into SS, and $300 into my 403-b, as well as around $120 in healthcare contributions.
     
    Backroads likes this.
  11. TrademarkTer

    TrademarkTer Habitué

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2017
    Messages:
    996
    Likes Received:
    646

    Jan 2, 2018

    Not because you work at a private school. Public school teachers tutor all the time.
     
    DressageLady and Backroads like this.
  12. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2014
    Messages:
    1,558
    Likes Received:
    477

    Jan 2, 2018

    I was referencing my state of California.

    “California public school teachers do not pay Social Security taxes or earn Social Security benefits. Instead, they participate in the California State Teachers’ Retirement System (STRS).”

    https://ed100.org/lessons/pensions
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2018
  13. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2014
    Messages:
    1,558
    Likes Received:
    477

    Jan 2, 2018

    Public schoolteachers are not allowed to advertise their tutoring services to students. Students have to approach the teachers, not the other way around. In my teaching credential program, we were taught about the Conflict of Interest Law for PUBLIC schoolteachers. It does not apply to private teachers. :p

    Thus, I recommend that certain students need tutoring and then offer to do the tutoring. The parents accept my services without fail. It’s a beautiful thing.
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2018
  14. TrademarkTer

    TrademarkTer Habitué

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2017
    Messages:
    996
    Likes Received:
    646

    Jan 2, 2018

  15. TrademarkTer

    TrademarkTer Habitué

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2017
    Messages:
    996
    Likes Received:
    646

    Jan 2, 2018

    Wait so you tutor your own students??? I would feel bad doing that---I agree that it's a conflict of interest, but I feel like it's in bad taste even if it were allowed. I get enough requests from students of other teachers that I have to turn many of them down anyway, and we keep our name on the guidance office tutor list when available.
     
    2ndTimeAround and Backroads like this.
  16. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2014
    Messages:
    1,558
    Likes Received:
    477

    Jan 2, 2018

    Based on the information you’ve given me, I am going to do a little mathematical exercise, because mathematics!

    I have determined that you made $2.983.87 last pay period after taxes. If you are paid over 20 months (on a 10-month contract), then that comes out to $59,677.42 annually after taxes. If you are paid over 24 pay periods (on a 12-month contract), then that comes out to $71,612.90 annually after taxes.

    Was I correct? :)
     
  17. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2014
    Messages:
    1,558
    Likes Received:
    477

    Jan 2, 2018

    I tutor my own students and students from surrounding schools, both at the high school and collegiate levels.

    Parents request me all the time. I am in such high demand that I, too, turn down students. I rarely self-advertise, but I am still legally able to do so.
     
  18. TrademarkTer

    TrademarkTer Habitué

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2017
    Messages:
    996
    Likes Received:
    646

    Jan 2, 2018

    It's pretty darn close.
     
    futuremathsprof likes this.
  19. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2014
    Messages:
    1,558
    Likes Received:
    477

    Jan 2, 2018

    Yeah! Go mathematics!
     
  20. TrademarkTer

    TrademarkTer Habitué

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2017
    Messages:
    996
    Likes Received:
    646

    Jan 2, 2018

    Anyway getting back to MO, anyone love how they call it "Right to Work" so it sounds like it's a good thing? Like "Right to Bear Arms", "Right to Freedom of Religion" etc...
     
    AmyMyNamey likes this.
  21. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2014
    Messages:
    1,558
    Likes Received:
    477

    Jan 2, 2018

    I agree. It seems “Right to Work” states are the worse places to work, ironically...
     
    DressageLady likes this.

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. waterfall,
  2. ready2learn,
  3. futuremathsprof,
  4. Leah Wilson
Total: 313 (members: 6, guests: 202, robots: 105)
test