Male Elementary Teacher Demand?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by SpursGoMarchingOn, Jun 23, 2017.

  1. SpursGoMarchingOn

    SpursGoMarchingOn Rookie

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    Jun 23, 2017

    Hi all,
    I'm new to the forum. I'm a student at a community college in NYC (m 21/yo), a soldier in the Army National Guard, and a prospective teacher. I am wondering about entering elementary education and had some questions.

    1. Is there a bias against/towards men in elementary education?
    2. How saturated is the field?
    3. Is it easy to find a job in another state? (nowhere in particular in mind, but I do want to leave NY when finished with schooling)
    4. Would I be responsible for teaching math, social studies, language arts, and science? This is what I would want.
    5. I am a bit confused on what to major in. I want to teach between grades 1 to 5. The school I want to transfer to for my BA has majors in History childhood education, math childhood education, biology childhood education, etc. Is there a big difference in this? Would they all be able to become elementary teachers?

    I'm sorry if I wasn't as clear as I would like to be, this is all just so new to me and I am anxious and excited to start! Any advice would be appreciated!
     
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  3. Kat.

    Kat. Companion

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    Jun 23, 2017

    I don't have an answer for all of your questions, but can answer some.

    It just depends on where you go as to whether or not it'll be easy to find a job. Each state is totally different so you might need to get certified to teach in another state after you move, so keep that in mind. Then you have different districts that are easier to get into than others. On top of that, certain schools are easier to get into (ex: a title school might have a higher turnover rate, meaning more job openings).

    Your teaching responsibilities will also differ by school and grade level. The school I'm at K-2 is self contained, so the teachers teach everything aside from specials. 3-5 split (one teacher teaches math/science, the other teaching RELA/social studies).

    I *think* any of those majors would be able to become elementary teachers...I didn't major in education at all and I still became one through an alternative program.

    Sorry I couldn't help with everything! Hopefully some of this is of use to you.
     
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  4. SpursGoMarchingOn

    SpursGoMarchingOn Rookie

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    Jun 23, 2017


    Thank you so much! That is very helpful to me and answered a lot of questions I had that I didn't even ask! I appreciate it truly. I was told by another person in my college that I would probably need to get certified in another state to teach in it. I hope that reciprocity is an available option.
     
  5. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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    Jun 23, 2017

    ,
     
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2019
  6. SpursGoMarchingOn

    SpursGoMarchingOn Rookie

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    Thank you for the reply! I've heard the problems about the red states, but I am willing to move (if even only until I find something else) to secure a position. I grew up and lived my entire life in NYC, so another big urban environment would suit me. I wouldn't mind working in the inner city as I am a product of inner city schools after all. It is a little disheartening to hear that elementary ed is oversaturated. One of my biggest interests is history, but I've heard that finding a social studies teacher job is like finding the Holy grail.
     
  7. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    Jun 23, 2017

    1. I've actually noticed that male elementary teachers are absolutely beloved and requested above female teachers. The theory is parents looking for a good male role model or something.

    2. Depends on the area. My state (Utah) is turning into a pretty decent field with a recent case of districts trying to outdo each other in raises and new teacher salaries in order to attract talent, which is kind of cool.

    3. We have a gal that came all the way from Philadelphia.

    4. Depends on the elementary system, but it's a solid chance you can do that.

    5. Likely. My state just makes you take a test with a following time period to get more specific teacher training.
     
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  8. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    Jun 23, 2017

    Take what I'm about to say with a grain of salt. I have no hard numbers, just personal experience.

    Elementary ed is over saturated everywhere. Even in states where teachers are treated horribly. It is hard to find a job if there isn't an opening where you student taught around here.

    There is a slight prejudice against male teachers in the lower grades. Most mommies are fine with equality until their little baby has a male kindergarten teacher :(. But third grade and up? It seems to be an advantage. In my experience principals will rearrange teaching assignments because of this. Meaning, Miss Smith teaches 5th grade and is AWESOME at it! An position opens up for 2nd grade. A qualified man applies and is hired. But he is placed in 5th grade and Miss Smith is sent to 2nd.

    Each school teaching subjects differently. At one of my kid's schools teachers team taught. So one 4th grade teacher taught social studies to four different classes, one taught science, one taught math. All taught ELA.
     
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  9. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    1. IME you would have an easier time getting an elementary position as a man. I have seen schools at job fairs that literally have signs out that say, "We are looking for minority candidates and male elementary teachers." Any male that applies to my school automatically gets an interview (assuming they meet the basic qualifications for the position, of course) because my principal wants to diversify the staff. That doesn't mean they'll get the position, often times they don't because they just don't interview well, but they automatically at least get the opportunity. You would probably have the easiest time getting something in upper elementary. There seems to be a general assumption that men are better at handling discipline in these grades.
    2. Elementary education is pretty saturated in most places. We supposedly have a "teacher shortage" in my area but this is the one field that still seems to have plenty of applicants. My admin has been complaining that the applicant pools are smaller/lower quality in recent years, but you're still looking at a minimum of at least 50 people applying. A few years ago it was in the hundreds. In my hometown, which is in a good state to be a teacher, it's in the thousands. Your best shot is in either really "rough" inner city areas or very rural areas. In my state the rural areas have the best job markets...they really are begging for people. Of course, those are places that not many people want to move to.
    3. Yes, assuming the state you move to has a greater need for teachers and you get that state's license ahead of time. My district goes to job fairs in Michigan because that's a saturated market and our market (Colorado) isn't. I'm originally from OH. A lot of people aren't willing to spend the money to get a license in another state prior to having a job lined up or at least interviews lined up, but schools won't really take you seriously until you have that state's license in hand. I have seen this happen over and over again with friends in various different states.
    4. This depends on the school. IME most schools have K-3 teachers teaching all subjects. Some schools have 4-6 teachers departmentalized. At my current school K-6 teaches all subjects. In my home state the state has forced schools to departmentalize past 4th grade. There, elementary licenses are K-3 and 4th-9th grade is considered "middle childhood" for licensing. Those teachers have to pick two subjects to specialize in and they can only teach those 2 subjects.
    5. Those seem like odd majors to me if you are talking about teaching elementary. I would verify with the university what you will be licensed to teach in when you graduate and make sure you will be licensed as a general elementary teacher and not just a teacher for that one subject.
     
  10. SpursGoMarchingOn

    SpursGoMarchingOn Rookie

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    Thank you guys for all the useful information! It is a shame that some people feel men would be better off not teaching younger children. Granted, I would ideally like to teach grades 4-5 so it isn't as "iffy" as a man teaching K-3, according to what I hear. I think it is important for a child to have a positive male figure in their life at a young age, especially if they come from a background where they don't have one at home. That's my main reason for wanting to teach elementary. I understand the job market is tough for K-5, but I plan on keeping at it.
     
  11. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Jun 24, 2017

    If you can't get a job in the city, you can always look for jobs in NJ (Then you'd have to move here within a year of getting the job)
     
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  12. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    1. Is there a bias against/towards men in elementary education? I don't think so. There are less males in elementary, but they are a smaller percentage of the candidate pool as well

    2. How saturated is the field? Elementary Ed is pretty saturated in the NY/NJ metro area and other areas as well. It's not unusual for competitive districts to get 50-100 resumes for each available opening.

    3. Is it easy to find a job in another state? (nowhere in particular in mind, but I do want to leave NY when finished with schooling) you'd have to check reciprocity with your license but there are areas in some states where it might be easier to land a job...Las Vegas and North Carolina are two areas that members here have found to be successful in the recent past. Not easy in NJ.

    4. Would I be responsible for teaching math, social studies, language arts, and science? This is what I would want.
    Elementary teachers are for the most part 'gen Ed', and teach all core content areas

    5. I am a bit confused on what to major in. I want to teach between grades 1 to 5. The school I want to transfer to for my BA has majors in History childhood education, math childhood education, biology childhood education, etc. Is there a big difference in this? Would they all be able to become elementary teachers? I've never heard of those majors,....math or ELA concentration with elem Ed make the most sense. Do they offer special Ed/elem Ed? That would be marketable as well
     
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  13. John Lee

    John Lee Groupie

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    As a male elementary teacher, I am pretty well appreciated at my school. And even going back years as a substitute, I was always respected by students, parents, and staff. However, it did me no favors during the hiring process, not that it necessarily should. It is something you think *might* help in your favor, bringing diversity to a staff dominated (at least in my area) by white, women. I would piggyback a lot on what czacza above said... 50-100 applicants. (That is good improvement from when I was looking for a job: 500-1,000 applicants.) It (being a man) did not help me land an interview in five years...

    Also, in terms of a major, I would put some extra effort into something like Math. You are entering a career that has some security, but is still highly tenuous in the early years. Pink slips are still very much in play for all newer teachers! In that scenario, you would ideally want to have another ability to teach, and since Math is always in need, you would give yourself some added job security by being able to teach Math (in secondary). If I were in your shoes, this is what I would try and do.
     
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