Lesson Planning

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Motivationalwealthyguru, Jul 11, 2017.

  1. Motivationalwealthyguru

    Motivationalwealthyguru Rookie

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    What is the most time consuming aspect of the lesson planning process?
     
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  3. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Jul 12, 2017

    what is your experience with lesson planning, Motivationalwealthyguru?
     
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2017
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  4. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    It honestly depends on the individual teacher / subject. Are you currently teaching or are you studying to be a teacher?
     
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  5. rpan

    rpan Companion

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    For me, the research (watching yt videos, reading teacher blogs, websites etc) that goes into making lessons engaging takes the most time. I could flash power points all day everyday and that would cut planning time considerably but that's not engaging for students or for me.
     
  6. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Groupie

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    And yet that's what I see a lot of teachers do. Or their ''planning'' involves turning on the computer and loading up the curriculum's online components and they just go through the presentation with the ELA or Math lesson. It's really sad. It makes planning easy but it's not true teaching in my opinion. The real dirty work of planning and teaching is just handed over to *ANYBODY* who can just click through slides and read the teacher's guide. Even the students understand how ridiculous that is. I'll use it as a guide for sure (especially if it's REQUIRED by the district,) but it's not ALL that I will do. I'll find supplemental resources and will find alternatives to all the GD worksheets that these programs seem to emphasize. Who designs these things? UGH! But the districts pay $$$ so they want you to use them and expect strong results. :rofl:
    If a teacher can't explain what they're teaching or if the students can't explain what they've learned... learning hasn't taken place. Sorry. When I open up the TE for Reading and see like 10 + objectives on a page I have to chuckle to myself. There's no way you're explicitly teaching these things.

    Back to the question: I think physically WRITING the plans was the most time consuming. Because I had all these ideas in my head and I wanted to just "do," but having to sit down and write them on paper -- a week at a time -- just became too much. However, when you start to think like a teacher, the planning process becomes easier. You can just think about a lesson you have to teach and say ''AAH! I got it!" :boom:
     
  7. Motivationalwealthyguru

    Motivationalwealthyguru Rookie

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    i have been an educator and writing lesson plans for 16 years now...
     
  8. Motivationalwealthyguru

    Motivationalwealthyguru Rookie

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    I currently teach Health and Physical Education on the secondary level. What subject/subjects do you teach and how long does it take you to plan for a week?
     
  9. Motivationalwealthyguru

    Motivationalwealthyguru Rookie

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    So on an average, for well thought out innovative lesson plan how long does it take you to complete it--from start to finish??? Thank you for your great reply!!
     
  10. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    For me, I tend to plan whole units in advance. The way I teach is much more one-on-one instead of the tradition group of students in a classroom, so I have to plan for asynchronous learning. Think Flipped Classroom Model. I've been teaching this way for years so I'm very used to both creating a month's worth of lessons in a block AND making major adjustments on the fly.
     
  11. Motivationalwealthyguru

    Motivationalwealthyguru Rookie

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    Jul 12, 2017

     
  12. Motivationalwealthyguru

    Motivationalwealthyguru Rookie

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    Ok so reflect back on your 1st or 2nd year as an educator, what was the most time consuming aspect of the planning process and how long did it take for you to complete a lesson plan for the upcoming week?
     
  13. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    Yes, but....GOOD lesson plans take a lot of time. As the expectations for teachers increase, planning time decreases. Not all teachers are willing or able to give up evenings and weekends to develop unique and engaging plans for every lesson.
     
  14. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    My first year of teaching had me spending about 10 hours a week developing plans. Thankfully I had the internet and only one prep. Because of class sizes and student abilities, that one prep was more like 2.5. No one at my school taught that subject so I was on my own.
     
  15. msleep

    msleep Rookie

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    [QUOTE="
    if the students can't explain what they've learned... learning hasn't taken place." :boom:[/QUOTE]

    Not necessarily true.
     
  16. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Grade 3. 20 years experience. It takes me VERY LITTLE time to plan.
     
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  17. swansong1

    swansong1 Maven

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    I teach SPED and have 25 preps a week for my students in grades 4-8. I rely on the prepared lessons from our curriculum and just copy and paste them into my plans. That allows me much more time to find ways to incorporate other activities and helps to make things more engaging and interesting.
     
  18. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    What was your experience? I imagine PE planning is different than classroom just as elementary is different than middle school and different than high school.
     
  19. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    The actual planning part takes very little time for me. I'm fortunate because I don't have to turn in lesson plans (although I'm afraid that might change with our new P next year), so my plans are just a bulleted list of activities full of abbreviations that only make sense to me! I teach SPED; 4 grade levels with no provided curriculum, so the most time consuming aspect for me is finding/creating materials. Luckily I've gotten really good at figuring out what the logical next step is for each student over the years, but then I generally have to create something on my own that will match that. Since I'm not following any specific curriculum or always teaching the same standards, I can't reuse anything from year to year either; every year changes based on the kids I get and their needs.
     
  20. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Jul 13, 2017

    I plan in units (some new each year and some I'm able to reuse, in some form, from year to year). I need to have daily plans for at least 3 days on my desk at all times, and seldom make specific plans further out than that; there are too many variables that can change things. For me, the biggest struggles continue to be keeping things fresh and engaging for my students and planning to meet the individual needs of all of my learners--from the lowest to the highest.
     
  21. nstructor

    nstructor Comrade

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    Jul 13, 2017

    You can write the most detailed and engaging lesson plans possible, but it all depends on the students during the learning. No one totally is able to stick to their plans on a daily basis.
     
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  22. Obadiah

    Obadiah Cohort

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    I agree. Just because a student can fill in a blank or choose a correct answer, that does not mean learning has occurred. Just because a student can ace a test after cramming the night before, that does not mean learning has occurred. The opposite is also true. Just because a student can't complete a worksheet doesn't mean learning hasn't occurred; the student may be in the process of learning.

    Back to the OP, what takes me the longest in lesson planning is also my favorite part of the process, researching the subject. In elementary, I don't do this for every single lesson, but I enjoy doing extra research on a topic. I kind of over prepare.

    My preparations guide me in teaching the basic outcomes for the lesson because I better understand how the basics mold together in preparation for advanced learning in the future. I'm also ready to field questions the students have, and I'm better able to guide discussions that evolve from student comments. Personally, I think student questions and comments are a significant and necessary part of a lesson; this is when their brains interact with the lesson, when their neurons develop connections with previous learning, and when metacognitive learning takes place. The extra research also further develops my enthusiasm for the topic which ultimately spills out into my presentation of the lesson.
     

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