Kindergarten Weekly Behavior Report

Discussion in 'Behavior Management Archives' started by HNV4700, Aug 10, 2004.

  1. HNV4700

    HNV4700 New Member

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    Aug 10, 2004

    I will be a first year Kindergarten teacher this year. I just got the job a couple of weeks ago, and I've done little with this age group, so I'm scrounging around to get things together. One thing I wanted to do was a weekly behavior report to go home to parents. My idea was to have a form with squares for each day of the week - children receive a smiley face for a good day - and an X over the smiley face if they displayed inappropriate behavior (after corrections had been made, of course). I also wanted it to have a place for parents to initial every day and a place where I could comment daily (if needed) and the parents could also comment. I haven't been able to find anything like that online. Can anyone give me suggestions on where I might find something like that? Please email me if anyone has something to share or any other information.

    Thanks in advance!!

    Nikki :)
     
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  3. Kay

    Kay Guest

    Aug 10, 2004

    2nd grade teacher

    I've created daily report forms on the computer, using the draw or shape tools to make faces. Instead of X-ing a smiley face, consider using a series of faces, happy, medium, and sad, then you can circle the appropriate one. I used one with categories for different areas with 3rd grade classes; I don't remember exactly but things like cooperation (with others), following directions, completing work (or staying on task). There was space at thye bottom to write comments as time allowed.
    Good luck!
     
  4. HNV4700

    HNV4700 New Member

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    Aug 10, 2004

    That is a great idea to use the different faces and circle the appropriate one. Thanks for the suggestions! I'll try and see what I can come up with.
     
  5. none

    none Guest

    Aug 24, 2004

    is this what you need?

    Hi...just happened to come across your message and then two websites later what it seems you are looking for in my search for a form to have my son's teacher fill out regarding academic work each week...

    here is the link...

    http://www.jimwrightonline.com/pdfdocs/tbrc/tbrcsection9.pdf

    Good luck!!!
     
  6. mccwen

    mccwen Comrade

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    Sep 10, 2004

    I give a daily behavior slip to my kids. I have green "Great Day", yellow "So-so Day" and red "Sad Day" with corresponding smiley (or sad-faced) faces. On the yellow and red day slips there is a small check list of common misbehaviors and I can quickly check-off specifics as why the child received a yellow or red (not following directions, talking out of turn, not keeping hand to self, etc.) Red ones must be signed by a parent and parents know these come home everyday. If you post your email address or send me a private message, I can email you a copy.
     
  7. Alegria

    Alegria New Member

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    Sep 11, 2004

    Hi, I'm new here and am a kindergarten teacher (and in the process of finishing grad school). In my classroom, I use a 'Stop Light' chart, a composition journal, and a calendar for each child. At the beginning of the year, my students learn classroom and school procedures (I don't like the word 'rules') including the role of the stop light. Each child has their own stop light- a rectangular piece of black construction paper with a green circle at the bottom. If I have to give a verbal warning, that child moves to yellow. As soon as the behavior improves, they move back to green. Red is a serious offense or if the behavior continues. The stop light chart corresponds directly to each child's behavioral journal. Each week, I write a note (sometimes brief, sometimes lengthy) to the students' guardians informing them of how their child's week went. I also paste a monthly calendar inside the journal which lets the guardian know what color their child was on at the end of the day. The journals allow for constant communication with the students' guardians and the stop lights are a visual behavioral reinforcement for the students (and at the end of the week, if the student has remained on green all week, they pull a prize from the Mystery Box)

    Hope this helps and if you want, I can send you some pictures. :)
     
  8. Mrs. V

    Mrs. V Rookie

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    Sep 12, 2004

    I use a method similar to this, we have a pocket chart and each child has his own pocket with an index card that has a red, yellow, and green dot on opposite corner/ends. Our theme is go for the green. When a child misbehaves they flip their card to yellow, that is a warning. If they continue to misbehave they flip their card to red, which gets a note home. We talk at the beginning of the year about how we are responsible for our own actions, and that only they can keep themselves from getting in trouble. They always have the oppurtunity to go back to green for good behavior, and each child starts on green no matter what they ended on the day before.

    I also thought about the behavior report, we use to have something similar to that when I was in elementary school. Keep in mind that was 10+ years ago, but it is a pretty good idea. Each student had a type of calender in their binder/notebook. At the end of the day, the teacher would come around and either put a stamp on the day(we were the cougars, so we had paw prints) for good behavior, or would jot a note down for the parents. That way the parents alway knew what kind of day their kid had. I even think once you got a certain number of paw prints you got some kind of reward.
     
  9. leleheadstart

    leleheadstart New Member

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    Dec 13, 2004

    I think i might be to late but here is something

    Hey Nikki I was just going through some sites because my headstart wants to pretty much do what you were looking to do. If you go to proteacher.com then scroll down the page you will see behavior Mgt click on that. Another screen will come up scroll down the page and you will see where it says good behavior charts click on it. When I printed it out it displays a whole week and then it will say comments. I hope this helps you if you already have something this year great but if not i hope this works. Le-Ann
     
  10. GR8TCHR

    GR8TCHR Rookie

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    Dec 22, 2004

    What is your goal in sending home the reports every week? I heard a teacher once say this, "Do the parents send you a note home explaining how the child behaved on the weekend?" Unless the child was not being successful in school or the parents request a report, instead, you could use your energy to send home a weekly newsletter discussing the things you are doing in your classroom and exciting upcoming events. That way you are keeping it positive with your parents. This is just my opinion.
     
  11. ViolaSwamp

    ViolaSwamp Habitué

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    Jan 27, 2005

    Hawk, you are right that we don't get "weekend reports" and that our time is precious. However I think they are very valid. My goal (when I'm in longterm assignments) is to praise good behavior and shoot for improvement. Once you get used to doing them it could take less than a 1/2 hour. It is just filling out the check list and occasionally writing a few short comments. It never ceases to amaze me how parent-teacher contact improves child behavior.
     
  12. TeachWildThings

    TeachWildThings Comrade

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    Jan 28, 2005

    My kid's elementary had the same principle of the cards mentioned by Ms. V, it was adopted by whole school K-2 grades. My son's 2nd grade teacher sent home an "Ice Cream Cone." Each day of the week had a different color scoop (construction paper circles). They only missed a scoop if they went to red. Kinda like that idea because it was different from smiley faces. She also tried to at least incorporate something possitive (particularly if they didn't have many scoops) so that progress was shown but you were aware of what areas needed work. Just another idea ;) in the many, hope you find one that works!
     
  13. LuvPreKTeachin

    LuvPreKTeachin Rookie

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    Feb 9, 2005

    Good luck in your first year of Kindergarden! It is such an exciting grade! The state that I teach in has "Character Education" as part of the public school curriculum so a lot of our "rules and procedures" are on a state-wide level. We use the rubberband system at our school. Our behavior system is actually school-wide, which means everyone in the school uses the same behavior system. One of the best advantages of this is... by the second week of school until they leave grade three (our school only goes to grade three) they know the system and how it works. Basically they start out with five rubberbands each morning. They have the opportunity throughout the day to lose and/or gain rubberbands. This extends into encore and enhancement classes (PE, Music, Art, ect). If the class as a whole does well and has no major behavior problems in the enhancement classes, they can earn an RRCC (which stands for Respect, Responsibility, Courtest and Cooperation). The teacher usually gives rubberbands for these. Usually by the second week they learn that they have to have responsibility for their rubberbands because if they lose or break one... they don't get another one. (Needless to say, they learn not to play with them. :) ) It also forces the kids to work together as a cooperative group during certain times of the day. Especially in classes where the whole class is working towards an RRCC. They can also earn and/or lose rubberbands for showing or not showing good RRCC behavior. The principal also gives these out for classes that have 100% homework and/or attendance for the day. Any teacher in the school can give any child or class these. For example, if I see a class walking down the hallway nicely, I can give them an RRCC and/or rubberbands! It really is a wonderful system for our school! Good luck finding a system that works for you!

    Crystal
     
  14. LuvPreKTeachin

    LuvPreKTeachin Rookie

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    Feb 9, 2005

    Sorry... I spelled Kindergarten wrong! Isn’t that sad!! :) Also, the C in RRCC is courtesy not courtest! It's late and I am tired and getting delusional!

    Crystal
     
  15. clarnet73

    clarnet73 Moderator

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    Feb 9, 2005

    Can you explain a little more what an RRCC is? Is it a slip of paper, a token, what? I think it's a cool idea. :)
     
  16. LuvPreKTeachin

    LuvPreKTeachin Rookie

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    Feb 10, 2005

    The actual RRCC is a piece of paper. Our school's 'theme' this year is "Color Our World With Character" so first quarter's RRCC's were crayon shaped die cuts. This quarter they are using paint brush and paint palette shapes. It just has RRCC written on it. Here is a website that tells a little more about character education.

    http://www.ncpublicschools.org/charactereducation/

    Crystal
     
  17. LuvPreKTeachin

    LuvPreKTeachin Rookie

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    Feb 10, 2005

    Another wonderful character education resource is Dr. Ron Clark's 'Essential 55' book. Every day during the morning announcements, our principal reads a passage or 'rule' from Dr. Clark's book. I think it's wonderful because a lot of them are "life" rules. You have to understand certain rules in order to be a productive member of society and of the planet Earth! ;)

    http://www.ronclark.info/

    Here is a the description of the book from Mr. Clark's website.

    Ron Clark's New York Times Best Seller, "The Essential 55," describes the 55 rules and expectations he had of his students in Harlem and how he used manners and respect to help his classes achieve outstanding test scores.


    Crystal
     
  18. Michelleh

    Michelleh Guest

    Feb 10, 2005

    Weekly Behavior Notes

    Each child at my school has an agenda or a planner as we call it. It has the school handbook printed in the front of it. It has all kinds of things in it like weekly calendars, handwriting activities, math activities, etc. The students take these home daily because they put their spelling words in them. I told my parents that I wanted to communicate with them daily. I put a sticker and a note that says "Good Day" if the students followed all the school rules and didn't have to move a card for the day. If they didn't follow the rules then I write a short note that explains what happened. The parents sign that they read my note. It takes about 15 minutes to write in all the planners. It really helps because sometimes children don't tell what goes on at school and then when the weekly conduct form goes home the parents are shocked. It also helps to solve problems quicker because parents are informed. My parents write me and I write them back. One of my parents writes me everyday. Maybe you could use the black and white composition notebook as a conduct book. You put a calendar on each page. You could also put a newsletter and anything that you are studying for the week in the book. :rolleyes:
     
  19. LuvPreKTeachin

    LuvPreKTeachin Rookie

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    Mar 19, 2005

    I pulled this on our school's website for you, clarnet73... since you were inquiring about the RRCC program. This is what it stands for...

    Respect - "treating others the way you want to be treated"

    Responsibility - "doing what you are supposed to"

    Cooperation - "working together to do what is right"

    Courtesy - "to be polite to one another"



    Other Good Character Traits...

    Caring - "to be concerned about others"

    Fairness - "to treat others as you would like to be treated"

    Honesty - "to always tell the truth and do the right thing"

    Self Control - "to make good choices at all times"

    Determination - "to always do your best and never give up"

    Gratitude - "to be thankful for what we have"

    Our School Mission...
    ______________ School is a safe, orderly and caring place where character counts and you will see character education in action from the time the students arrive at school. The entire staff reinforces the basic belief that we are a place where students, staff, and parents are respected and learning is at its best.


    Crystal
     

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