Kids not respecting materials/the classroom

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Ms.Holyoke, Sep 27, 2018.

  1. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Groupie

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    Sep 27, 2018

    What do you do when you have kids who do not respect materials?

    My second class is difficult and it's frustrating to me that they do not respect materials/the classroom. Issues I've had are:
    -Throwing markers around the room, hitting each other
    -Throwing a table caddy across the room
    -Throwing paper balls around the room (this behavior has improved a little once I talked to them about it)
    -Shredding paper and leaving it on the floor
    -Something happened to my tissue box today?? and I'm pretty sure it was this class. (laughing when I asked a kid to get a tissue...)

    Obviously, the kids don't do these things in front of me so it is when I am not looking so I can't exactly give a consequence. However, I've had to stop a whole activity because of throwing markers.

    My dilemma is that I like to do fun/engaging activities in class but this class seems unable to participate. I am finally finishing up my computation unit soon and I can use the whiteboards when teaching exponents next Friday. I ordered whiteboard markers for very cheap on NAIER for the kids to use. I'm wondering if I should just not allow this class to use them and allow my other classes to use them OR whether there is something I can say/do to help them respect materials. They did used to leave paper all over my room but I was able to teach them to put it into their binder and that has gotten much better. It's not all of the students (just a few) so I could try to watch carefully and students who are not following expectations are not allowed to use materials for a certain amount of time.
     
    Last edited: Sep 27, 2018
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  3. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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    Sep 27, 2018

    Restrict what they have access to until they can use items appropriately.

    Have them put their backpacks by the door or along a wall (if they bring backpacks). Give them what they need when they need it. Maybe have them work in a group collaborative activity and give each group one marker and one large sheet of butcher paper. A bonus of this specific activity is you don't have to frame it as a punishment - you can tell them they don't need their other supplies as you want them to have enough table space.

    You teach math - so give them ten or so problems and make them switch who the writer is for every problem while the rest of the group explains how to solve the problem.
     
  4. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    Sep 28, 2018

    Agreed. Take everything away from them that they don't specifically need for that lesson. I wouldn't even give out markers and butcher paper. They can use their own pencil and paper to do all their math work.
    At this point, they don't even need to do special activities. They need to do the basic computations to complete the assignment. No group work. No collaboration. When they show that they have learned to be responsible classroom citizens you can begin to introduce more interesting activities.

    On a different note, teachers now-a-days seem to think that their classroom needs to be a dog and pony show every day. They claim that the children need all these fun activities to be "engaged". I'm old school and I think students can stay engaged with more traditional teaching with some fun activities interspersed now and then. We shouldn't have to create a three ring circus in our rooms every day.
     
  5. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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    Sep 28, 2018

    I don't think it's the new teachers' faults that they feel this way, as much as teacher education programs and overzealous administrators.

    I've had multiple principals who think that engagement and group work can solve all problems. Tough class? Bad behavior? It's because your class is no fun!

    There's nothing wrong with going back to basics and having students work with a paper, pencil, and no talking. In fact, many students actually like working quietly. It provides order and a sense of calm, and the expectations are clear. After they can handle that, then you can slowly introduce some more collaborative work.
     
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  6. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Groupie

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    Sep 28, 2018

    After I tried stations and groups today (and had to call admin and give 6 detentions), then I realize that I need to just to silent independent work for this class.
     
  7. tchr4vr

    tchr4vr Companion

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    Sep 28, 2018

    Just my two cents--from my experience, those students who are lower ability have a much harder time managing "fun" collaborative activities. Because they are lower, they are struggling with a lot of the basics, so asking them to do more higher-level items like collaboration, or being creative, can lead to behavior issues--if you can't understand the reading, at the most basic level, how can you be expected to write a sequel to the story (a common project)? I think many administrators forget that. While you can use fun activities to teach basics--they have to know the basics to be able to gain anything from those fun activities. I can do so many more fun activities with my advanced students. For example, they are writing a collaborative observation of the school--I sent each of them to different classrooms around the building to observe--I would never ask my lower kids to do that--I know they wouldn't be on task when they got there. Nor would they be able to critically pull apart other observations and put it into a coherent document. THere is a place for "fun", but there is also a place for sitting down, listening, taking notes, reading and writing.
     
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  8. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Groupie

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    Sep 28, 2018

    ^
    I feel like this is the way I have to go...lesson, worksheet and exit ticket for this group. I feel bad for the kids who are not disruptive but I don’t know what to do.

    My math coach said I have to do stations and pull struggling kids. I tried that today and it was a disaster. The higher kids cannot work independently without being disruptive or off task. The computer teacher at my school told me that this school often gives suggestions but gives no strategies for implementing them. She said that she often asks them for support in implementing X when it’s not possible.
     
  9. TrademarkTer

    TrademarkTer Groupie

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    Sep 28, 2018

    Our coach offers to teach lessons for us if we want to observe something she suggests. I would recommend asking your coach to come model what she has in mind.

    The kids who are not disruptive will probably appreciate things getting under control, and won't miss the activities if it means there can be structure and order in the classroom.

    I follow a pretty boring structure most weeks (Monday-Wednesday=direct instruction, Thursday=practice, Friday=quiz or test). Obviously this varies on occasion, but this is my general format, and I find it works very well. Something that really helps for me to break up the direct instruction...I do little brain breaks/find the differences/identify the close-up/trivia type breaks on Sporcle, or from other places. I give out candy for correct answers. I only do these if time will allow, and it helps make my lecturing at them all period more enjoyable. The kids always ask for them, and if I had behavior issues, I would take them away for poor behavior.
     
  10. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Groupie

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    Sep 28, 2018

    That’s a good idea. Although I’m sure she would suggest I take a station and she take a station or something which still wouldn’t work for me. The computer teacher (used o teach ELA) said she has never had a group independent enough to work when she pulled a group of kids. She told me that that’s what I should say if I am told that I should pull a group of kids.
     

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