Kiddo has me exhausted...

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Backroads, May 16, 2018.

  1. Backroads

    Backroads Fanatic

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    May 16, 2018

    Yeah, I only have a week and a half of school left, but I don't know if I'm going to make it because of That Kiddo. All he has done for the past week is scream at me. It's at the point I'm crying at recess. He is extremely defiant and extremely hyperactive. I have tried all year to build a relationship, but it just hasn't gotten very far. Whenever he bullies or bothers others, he denies everything, blames them, or, somehow, both.

    Any tips for surviving?
     
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  3. kellzy

    kellzy Comrade

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    May 16, 2018

    Sounds like my kiddo. I took him to the office and said he's not welcome in my classroom anymore and if he shows up at my classroom again I'd escort him back to the office.
     
  4. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    Wow.

    At my school that would probably end with the kid getting candy and put in the gym where he could play basketball.
     
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  5. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

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    May 16, 2018

    Might (will) be hard, but see if you can just focus on positive interactions -- ignore (to the extent possible) the negatives and just interact in every little moment there's something positive happening.
     
  6. Been There

    Been There Habitué

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    Have you by any chance discovered the special interests of this student? If you've read any of my previous responses to behavior management issues, you may have read my analogy to animal training. Mathmagic is on the right track by focusing on positive behaviors. However, in this case, I would strongly suggest that you consider developing a few fun activities for this young man centered around his interests. For example, if he likes fishing, you can bring in some fishing tackle - let him show you how to rig the equipment. Let him do all the talking while you just listen (this will be the most difficult part for you). Tell him that you'd like him to help you to label the fishing paraphernalia. Let him attach the labels to the various pieces of equipment: hook, fishing line, rod, reel, sinker, etc. Next, ask him to tell you something about how the hook is used - write his sentence on the board. (e.g. The hook is tied to the end of the fishing line. / The hook is used to hold the bait.) Continue writing sentences that he composes for the other items. When finished, have the student read the sentences after you (one at a time). Then have him copy the sentences into his notebook. This approach is guaranteed to eliminate oppositional or disruptive behavior, especially if you engage the student by asking him questions (as if you know nothing about fishing). It can be equally effective with a small group or even with a whole class - surprise your young man by inviting him to be your assistant. The same approach can also be applied to almost any area of interest.

    Notice that I referred to the youngster not as "kiddo", but as a student or young man. For me, just by referring to him as a student or client changes my mindset and helps me to acquire a more productive analytical perspective. It also allows me to take a quasi-scientific approach that facilitates developing an instructional strategy that will work. While developing healthy student-teacher (not kiddo-teacher) relationships are important, being able to apply effective instructional design for your most challenging students'/clients' lessons is paramount. IMO, the labels we assign to our pupils are more important than most teachers realize. What has worked for me may work for you too!
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2018
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  7. Been There

    Been There Habitué

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    I just realized my suggestions may not be appropriate for middle school students. Are you now at an elementary school?
     
  8. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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    May 17, 2018

    Give the student a job - sort these papers into folders by color, use these baby wipes to clean all these scissors off (maybe not scissors with this child though, haha), test every marker in this giant box and make piles for good/not good markers. This works for my couple of students like this, although the students I have are hyperactive and very off task but not defiant. They need to be kept busy every single moment. I tell them how much the job is helping me and how much I appreciate it, and it makes them feel special!
     
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  9. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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    May 17, 2018

    This is sometimes a good strategy but doesn't always work for very loud behavior (like screaming). I have a student who very loudly interrupts lessons, and it's difficult to ignore as they'll just persist until it's addressed (the screaming gets louder or continues endlessly). This year, I've really found that quiet redirection is helpful. Don't mention the behavior, but do walk up and give a small direction that's easy to follow immediately, like "Read question 1 out loud to me."
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2018
  10. Backroads

    Backroads Fanatic

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    Sadly, I have yet to be able to find any interests of him that are reasonable and socially appropriate. He likes dancing, and I give him dance time, but it's barely made a dent. I've exhaunsted my management toolbox on this kid. I think there are many things that could potentially work, but his hyperactivity and defiance and bullying behavior always rise to the forefront.
     
  11. Backroads

    Backroads Fanatic

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    Yes, he's a 2nd grader. Theoretically your ideas ought to work, and I"ve used similar ideas in the past with other students successfully, but this one has me stumped.
     
  12. Kat.

    Kat. Companion

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    May 17, 2018

    I don't have advice but I will offer hugs because I'm going through the same with about 9 kids in my class this year. 11 more days and they couldn't go by fast enough...
     
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  13. Backroads

    Backroads Fanatic

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    May 17, 2018

    I know what you mean.

    I think if I had the time and manpower to focus on him, things could work out, but I have about 6 students who require near-constant redirection.
     
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  14. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Wow. That comment could get a teacher escorted to an admin’s office.
     
  15. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

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    May 18, 2018

    That always happens to me. No darn discipline in this doggone place!
     
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  16. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

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    What does redirection do??

    Nada, zero, zilch...they redirect themselves right back to driving the whole class up a wall.
     
  17. Backroads

    Backroads Fanatic

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    May 18, 2018

    It means I'm following the tips of those wiser than me including popular mommy bloggers who believe all will be super-keen and gifted potential will be unleashed if I just constantly redirect a severely distracted student. :D Plus, keep him front and center but of course not next to the other severely distracted students who also need to be constantly redirected and sitting front and center.
     
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  18. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

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    They do the same thing with the seniors in the nursing home. Put them in all in front at the nurses’ station.
     
  19. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

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    I’m offering hugs too. Take good care of yourself.
     
  20. MaleTeacher

    MaleTeacher Rookie

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    May 18, 2018

    This used to happen at my old school. Then administration wondered why students in upper grades had so many behavior problems.
     
  21. Been There

    Been There Habitué

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    May 19, 2018

    Unfortunately, many students seem to have had few opportunities to develop their own interests - often limited to TV and video games. This presents a perfect opportunity for you to introduce your incorrigible student to perhaps something that you are personally familiar with. For example, depending on your own interests, you might surprise the young man (and your class) with tasting a delicious _______. Have him/them guess what the mystery food is, where it originated, how it was made, etc. If you have any pets, how about bringing in a small or even a large animal to school for your students to experience. The possibilities are endless and are limited only by your motivation. Whatever you do, be sure to be melodramatic and always include your screamer to assist you in your presentation. The key will be to divert his attention so effectively that his negative behaviors will be extinguished! Challenge yourself to crack this nut (no pun intended) before your student teaching ends.

    I think you'll find that the young man will even be willing to participate in follow-up activities involving reading and writing - if you guide him in learning to be a leader and not a disrupter. For reading about the special topic that was just presented, have him assist you by using the pointer as you read a few related sentences shown on-screen. How about having him compose a simple sentence while you simultaneously write it on-screen so that everyone can then copy it into their notebooks? I call this approach Flipping the Student!

    Tip: It helped me tremendously not to think of my charges as my "kiddos", but as my clients. My focus was always on developing not a warm and fuzzy kiddo-teacher relationship, but a no-nonsense student-teacher relationship. The downside to this perspective is less warm incentives for the teacher (e.g. no more hugs), but the upside is better control of the uncontrollable. Try it and see what happens from Day 1 next year! I'm confident that what worked for me can work for you too.
     
    Last edited: May 19, 2018
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