Just how direct/indirect to be in suggesting an IEP?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Backroads, Dec 4, 2017.

  1. Backroads

    Backroads Enthusiast

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    Dec 4, 2017

    Today I found out yet another one of my students has a diagnosed issue. This was a student I've been gathering information for the child assessment team, so this revelation was no surprise. This brings me to a total of eight students in my class who a parent has told me has such-n-such, but there is no documentation. In many of these cases, an IEP/504 would be so handy, to have an official attack plan legalized on paper.

    However, I understand that many families don't want these. I also am at a loss at how direct I can be. I have informed many of these parents about the IEP/504 laws, but this gets shrugged off. But I also don't want any of these parents NOT to know about these options. I'm just not sure how much of it is my place to suggest this, and if so, in what words.

    So far, it's been "Hey, so Johnny has XYZ. Did you know Section 504 and/or Individualized Education Plans can help with that?"
     
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  3. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    Dec 4, 2017

    Whenever I've had questions like these about a child, I always suggest that a student may benefit from being referred to the Local Screening Committee (or I say that I will refer them myself). That way, the IEP/504 conversation happens in a legal way with a team. If a parent asks about the Local Screening Committee, I give them a general outline of what it does, and emphasize the point that the primary goal is getting everybody on one page to help the student.
     
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  4. Kelster95

    Kelster95 Companion

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    Dec 5, 2017

    You can and should refer them to the child assessment team which lets the school know that their is an academic problem and puts the ball in the parents court. The team knows how to breach the conversation with reluctant parents and if parents refuse your concern and their refusal is documented for the next teacher.
     
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  5. vickilyn

    vickilyn Virtuoso

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    Dec 5, 2017

    Two great answers. As a teacher working only with classified students, I have to remember that to some parents it is a stigma. Getting those students screened and evaluated is always step one. What comes after that is usually up to the CST. I've seen CST's move heaven and earth to get parents on board. I've also seen parents demanding testing and evaluation. To say it is a fluid transaction would be an understatement.
     
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