Judy Blume

Discussion in 'Second Grade' started by Roobunny, Dec 22, 2012.

  1. Roobunny

    Roobunny Comrade

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    Jan 4, 2013

    Funny you should mention "The Happy Hollisters." I was recently going through my childhood keepsake box and stumbled across an old Ramona diary of mine. I was in the third grade and had mentioned that I had just finished reading a Happy Hollisters book. I also loved reading old Bobbsey Twins books. I actually still own two copies that were published in the 30s.
     
  2. Dr Kevlar

    Dr Kevlar Rookie

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    Jan 5, 2013

    That's awesome, Roobunny! I realize that that genre has limitations and in particular the portrayals of gender roles and somewhat formal language. I think that the drive to have more "relevancy" in children's lit has overshadowed one of the values OF literature and that is to escape. Sure, kids will want to read things that they can relate to, just as adults do. There are times though when you just want to read something that takes your mind off things. That is why I read a Louis L'Amour western every now and again or many people read Fantasy or Romance novels. It is why I suggested non-fiction. Some readers from an early age like to learn things and escape in that fashion.

    Part of the issue (for me) is that we adults are trying to decide what kids should like rather than letting the reader be an active participant in their reading choices.

    When I was a kid, I would go to the local library and go into the sections of the stacks that I never saw anyone in just to see what books were there! Weird, I know, but you could find some real gems there. If I ever get my own room I think once a year I will have "Forgotten Library Day" and have the kids "investigate" the least-used parts of the school library...
     
  3. queenie

    queenie Groupie

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    Jan 5, 2013

    Sometimes I hesitate to recommend books that I read as a kid because I think the kids will feel like they're outdated, but I was surprised when I had Show and Tell after Christmas, one boy brought in his new set of Boxcar Children books and a girl brought in her boxed set of Nancy Drew mysteries! =)
     
  4. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Jan 6, 2013

    As teachers of reading, it's important to monitor students reading in the classroom. Students should be reading books they choose with accuracy, expression and deep comprehension. Just because a child CAN read specific texts doesn't mean they SHOULD...knowing a student's maturity, background knowledge and interests can help a teacher guide a student in making appropriate book choices.:2cents:
     
  5. Dr Kevlar

    Dr Kevlar Rookie

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    Jan 6, 2013

    Excellent point. I am not advocating a sort of literary free-for-all where we have precocious youngsters reading Faulkner (if one of them can explain Faulkner to me though, I would appreciate it!).

    Seriously, I realize that there needs to be an understanding hand helping to guide the young readers. My point is that we as "reading guides" should give them as wide of a sky as possible when choosing for themselves. We should be wary of jumping on bandwagons of particular types of stories and such and abandoning older works just because they are older works.

    I mean, if I were teaching secondary school, I would be wary of handing a young reader Plath's Collected Poems, but would not hesitate to give them some of Ted Hughes' early poems such as "The Thought Fox" to read.
     

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