Judy Blume

Discussion in 'Second Grade' started by Roobunny, Dec 22, 2012.

  1. Roobunny

    Roobunny Comrade

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    Dec 22, 2012

    Hi there! I read Judy Blume books LONG, LONG ago so I've forgotten if they are appropriate for a second grader. I have a student who bought me the "Fudge" series for my classroom library. These books are on her level as she is an advanced reader and I wanted to make sure she would be able to read them.

    While I am asking this question, what other books do you suggest for higher-level readers that are also appropriate? I have students in second grade reading between 4th-6th grade levels. Thus far I've given them Number the Stars, The Giver, Island of the Blue Dolphins, and Because of Winn-Dixie. Right now they are basically "rotating" through these books, but I'll need a new group soon. Any suggestions?

    Thanks!
     
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  3. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Dec 22, 2012

    Are these readers comprehending deeply in the books you lIsted? Id question second graders having enough background knowledge or maturity to deal with 'The Giver' or the historical nature and topics of 'Number the Stars'. Perhaps they could read some 'classics'...Alice in Wonderland, Misty of Chincoteague, Wizard of Oz...
     
  4. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    Dec 22, 2012

    If they can read Number the Stars and Island of the Blue Dolphins, they can read Judy Blume. Both of those are typically 6th grade books.
    Books by E.B. White, Roald Dahl, Beverly Cleary, Phyllis Reynolds Naylor, and Laura Ingalls Wilder.
    The Indian in the Cupboard, The Invention of Hugo Cabret, Savvy, Scumble, The Lemonade War series, more of Kate DiCamillo's books, some Andrew Clements books, will also work.
     
  5. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Dec 22, 2012

    Giraffe's suggestions are good ones and more appropriate for second grade sensitivities than some of the titles they've been reading. Also, consider carefully the subject matter in Judy Blume books...there's quite a range:huh: 'Fudge' books, yes. 'Are you there, God, it's me, Margaret', no.
     
  6. Roobunny

    Roobunny Comrade

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    Dec 22, 2012

    Yes, I have a couple of them who did comprehend "The Giver" and "Number the Stars." These books are not ones that all of them are reading.
     
  7. Roobunny

    Roobunny Comrade

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    Dec 22, 2012

    Thanks for the author suggestions!
     
  8. queenie

    queenie Groupie

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    Dec 22, 2012

    :eek: Number the Stars?? The Giver?? I read The Giver (my favorite book of all time) to fifth graders and felt compelled to skip over some parts. I'd NEVER recommend either of these books to a second grader...Have you read them lately?

    From commonsense.org book reviews about The Giver:
    Recommended for age 11; What parents need to know: Parents need to know that there is a disturbing scene in which Jonas witnesses his father euthanizing a baby by injecting it with a needle in the head. There are also mild sexual references. But the overall story is riveting -- and the book is one of the most thought-provoking novels for children ever written.

    They recommend Number the Stars for age 9 and say to parents: Parents need to know that Lois Lowry's sense of timing and choice of details put readers in the middle of the story. A riveting read, but your kids may have questions afterward.
     
  9. Roobunny

    Roobunny Comrade

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    Dec 22, 2012

    Only one of my students read "The Giver." He is reading and comprehending at a high 6th grade, possibly 7th grade level by now. We discussed the book as he read it. He actually wants to read more Lois Lowry now. Before I introduced him to this book he was only reading those "Fairy" books, which were way below his level.

    Also, he is familiar with the Holocaust and Nazi Germany and "Number the Stars" was a book he could identify with.

    I don't really feel that these were inappropriate for this particular child. Would I share them with all of my advanced readers? No. I also always check with each child's parents before giving them a book that may seem questionable and his parents both OK'd these two titles.

    Thanks for providing me with the website!
     
  10. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    He must be extremely mature and sophisticated for his age. Even at that, I feel compelled to help kids select books at their reading level that do not have such mature subject matter. just because a kid is capable of reading a particular book doesn't mean they necessarily should. I'm anti 'book banning' but I also feel there's enough time to read those books at a later time when good readers can comprehend and connect on a meaningful and mature level that eight year olds simply don't have yet.
     
  11. BumbleB

    BumbleB Habitué

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    Dec 22, 2012

    What about the "Little House on the Prairie" books? I think I read those around 4th grade....
     
  12. yellowdaisies

    yellowdaisies Enthusiast

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    Dec 22, 2012

    I think the Fudge books are fine, but I second a PP that Judy Blume's other books would NOT be appropriate.

    I was an advanced reader in elementary, and I think around 2nd/3rd grade I was really into Marguerite Henry's books (Misty of Chincoteague, etc) due to my horse obsession, Beverly Cleary, and Roald Dahl. I also loved Stuart Little, Charlotte's Web, and A Little Princess. I remember really liking Lois Lowry's Anastasia Krupnik series, but I can't remember what age I read those.

    I didn't read The Giver until I was an adult, but I agree that even if a 2nd grader can comprehend that book, the themes explored are not really age appropriate. The Giver is really along the lines of Slaughterhouse Five, Brave New World, etc - dystopic fiction. I'm not sure 7 and 8 year olds should be exposed to that yet, even if they can understand it.
     
  13. queenie

    queenie Groupie

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    Dec 22, 2012

    Please take into consideration also that parents often assume a teacher wouldn't suggest a book that's inappropriate. If a book is "questionable," I always just steer clear of it since my kiddos are so young. It's really annoying that there aren't more books written on higher levels that are socially/developmentally appropriate for younger kids!! I, too, have some kids who read on 4th-6th grade levels and are very advanced academically, but they are not emotionally ready to handle such content matter (which is great, since they are 7 - 8 year olds!)

    I looked up the Fudge series on the website and it seems they are appropriate for your age group, except that they suggest that the books debunk the tooth fairy, easter bunny, and Santa Claus :whistle:
     
  14. mollydoll

    mollydoll Connoisseur

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    Dec 22, 2012

    I loved Nancy Drew and Trixie Belden (those are out of print, probably) when I was in 2nd grade. I wasnt allowed to read them at school; I was forced to stay "on level."

    What about the DK Eyewitness books? I love those. It seems to me that reading one would send an 8 yr old off on a whole tangent of exploration through the non-fiction shelves.
     
  15. Ilovesummer

    Ilovesummer Companion

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    Dec 23, 2012

    I would definitely recomend Andrew Clements. My favorite Andrew Clements book when I taught 4th grade was Frindle. Another great read aloud that I always did in 4th grade is Love, Ruby Lavender. I can't remember who wrote that one, but it was great.
     
  16. BumbleB

    BumbleB Habitué

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    Dec 23, 2012

    Or what about the Joey Pigza books? As I remember from a few kids who read them last year, they're pretty silly and not controversial ;)
     
  17. Roobunny

    Roobunny Comrade

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    Dec 23, 2012

    Never heard of these...will definitely look into them!
     
  18. Dr Kevlar

    Dr Kevlar Rookie

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    Dec 28, 2012

    Being old (and therefore "old school" in some ways!) how about: "The Happy Hollisters" or "The Hardy Boys" or even "The Hobbit?"

    Perhaps some other options would be "The Iron Giant" by Ted Hughes? "Tom Sawyer," "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" and others spring to mind.

    I think sometimes we forget that not all of the old classics have somehow lost relevance or are no longer capable of holding the attention of young readers...
     
  19. hatima

    hatima Devotee

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    Dec 31, 2012

    I agree, I actually told a parent to read "The Giver" before letting her daughter read it. Her daughter (gifted and high IQ) wanted to read it along with some Margret Petterson Haddix books. I advised against both. I thought they were too deep. I told the mom exactly what my concerns were. I don't know if she let her read the books or not. (The mom asked my advise)

    I recommend, A little princess and The secret garden. You could try Nim's Island (my third graders really hated it, they found it boring...so did I) but they might have been too old for it.

    Also the Ronald Dahl books are good
    Try Mrs. Piggle Wiggle too
     
  20. hatima

    hatima Devotee

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    Dec 31, 2012

    Oh: Peter Pan (abridged or "edited" for kids just cause of some un PC terms) But 4th and higher unabridge/unedited, they might understand the offensive terms and violence.
     
  21. Dr Kevlar

    Dr Kevlar Rookie

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    Jan 1, 2013

    Winnie the Pooh (the original) might be an option.

    Also, what about biographies/non-fiction works? A good reader can (and should) be exposed to more than just fiction. I think at times we think only of certain categories and get frustrated with the selections. Perhaps widening the scope a bit will help.

    The "Good Reads" website lists a ton of books at the reading level you want. perhaps your school library already has some and can help you get the kids started reading them. I know when I was a kid I loved non-fiction and read more of that than I did fiction, even at that age.

    It might make it easier to sort out some of the context things that you are leary about having them be exposed to as well.
     

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