Job Search Advice

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Ms.Holyoke, Apr 7, 2018.

  1. bella84

    bella84 Fanatic

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    Apr 10, 2018

    Is the charter job at-will? If so, I'd accept it just for the job security, but I'd keep looking for something better. You'll find the people come and go throughout the summer and school year at charter schools. Unless they have a contract that you can't break without paying a fee, you might as well accept it and then back out later. The chances are good that they are already accustomed to this.
     
  2. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Cohort

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    Apr 10, 2018

    How would I find out if it is at will? I have to sign a letter of intent to accept the position.
     
  3. bella84

    bella84 Fanatic

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    Apr 10, 2018

    You’d have to read the contract... which probably means accepting orally but not signing anything until you’ve thoroughly read it. You can always back out until you sign the contract, and you can still back out after that if it’s at-will.
     
  4. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Cohort

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    Apr 10, 2018

    Would backing out of the contract tarnish my reputation? That is what I am worried about. :(
     
  5. bella84

    bella84 Fanatic

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    Apr 11, 2018

    It’s possible. But, unless you are in a small town, it’s probably not a big deal. Many charter schools see a lot of teacher turnover, even before the school year begins. In the end, you have to look out for yourself.
     
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  6. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Cohort

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    Apr 11, 2018

    I just got an automated email that the position for the school I taught my demo lesson at closed. :( They didn't even email me personally. There's one more math job at that school open but I don't think it's a good sign. I am really upset :(
     
  7. Been There

    Been There Comrade

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    Apr 11, 2018

    After experiencing many ups and downs in my own search for the ideal job, I learned to trust in God. Contrary to what I wanted to believe, I didn't have the power to make things go my way no matter how hard I tried. Even when I got the job I thought I wanted, it was never what I had hoped it would be. Although it's normal for us to feel dejected, frustrated, angry or upset when a job offer fails to materialize, have faith that the right job for you will appear when you least expect it - it just won't happen when you want it to! In the meantime, keep praying in earnest.
     
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  8. pommom

    pommom Comrade

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    Apr 12, 2018

    Yes, this part is so true. I relate. "Even when I got the job I thought I wanted, it was never what I had hoped it would be." I have had 2 teaching positions in hard to get into schools that I desired to teach so much. Both schools turned out horrible.
    Teacher job hunting is mentally exhausting. I am in the same boat too.
     
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  9. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

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    Apr 12, 2018

    Try not to panic and think all the doors and closing. Have you considered looking outside the box? If you need experience, private and parochial schools are another option. You may find more openings, and much more flexibility in the smaller schools. As a new teacher, you will definitely find smaller classrooms.

    Other programs need teachers as well. Group homes for foster children children need teachers. There are behavior modification programs for learning disabilities and challenging students under the district umbrella, or independent companies. After school programs with park districts and social service agencies are other avenues you can try. Non-profit programs that are geared towards homeless children are another option. Testing programs such as Kaplan also hire teachers as tutors.

    These positions may not pay nearly want you are seeking, but they will give you a bridge to cross before decide the best job for you. They will give you some hands-on experience, and perhaps help you narrow down choices for areas where you are willing to teach. Additionally, you can actively job hunt while employed. It will be less of a stigma to leave after one semester, or at least 6 months to a year. You will have some money coming in, and again...build experience.
     
  10. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Cohort

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    Apr 12, 2018

    ^
    I have a two year commitment to a high needs school, so I am looking at these specific districts.
     
  11. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Connoisseur

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    Apr 21, 2018 at 1:48 PM

    This is for those who are struggling or feel like they'll never find a job:

    I was thinking about my journey and wanted to share my experience which may prove helpful for others. My biggest piece of advice-- especially for those who are struggling to find a job -- is to apply for jobs and be available during the "off'' or "weird'' times when the districts are desperate for teachers. Right now is prime hiring season because all of the college graduates are applying like crazy in the hopes of getting a job for the next school year and school districts know it. They can post ads and be very picky as they know that they'll get a lot of applicants and competition. I fill out job apps, but I know that I won't get anything right now. That said, based on my experience I've gotten all of my job offers during the "off'' season when they really NEED teachers.

    June/ July 2014- I received my teaching certificate, interviewed with a school in Arizona and had my first teaching job interview. I was hired at the end and got to pick between third or fifth grade. I selected third grade. Shortly after, I was scrambling to get a new car, pack, say my good byes and was off on a cross- country drive because they needed me there for mid -July. Their summer was winding down and they NEEDED teachers.

    July 2015 -- I had spent a year in my first district, but moved home. My original plan was to work in Spain for the following school year, but it didn't work out, so I had to scramble - last minute - to make alternative plans. I applied, got an interview at a different district, and once again, was hired by the end of the interview and began my drive back. I had only spent a few weeks back home in NY before I was driving again.

    August 2016 -- I'm back home in NY and starting my graduate program. I get a call at the end of the month and I am offered a third grade LTS position because they really "needed'' me as school was going to start soon.

    December 2016 -- I interview for a full time position in the middle of the year, but lose out to a former student teacher. However, they call me shortly after and want to hire me as a LTS for the rest of the year. Not interested in the grade level, I politely decline. However, that could have been a FT job as the teacher didn't return.

    November/ December 2017 -- I have a Facetime ''interview'' (it was more like a conversation) for a Spanish teaching position; they offer it to me by the end of the phone conversation and want me to start at the end of January 2018.

    February / March 2018: I apply for a mid - year ESL LTS position. I have the interview and get the job. I could sense their desperation in the interview, but didn't want to be cocky about it. It turns out that only one other person even applied. I appreciated it, but I wasn't interested in working with the "littles.''

    April 2018: Jobs are posted and I am applying, but getting a lot of "thank you for your time'' rejection letters. Why? Because it's the PERFECT time when school districts can be super picky. I've learned based on my own experiences that I'll get hired during mid - late summer or in the middle of the school year when they really need "bodies in the classroom'' and can't be as picky as they'd like.

    For teachers who feel like they are getting constant rejections and will "never be hired,'' keep that in mind. Ask yourself, "When am I applying for jobs?'' And be ready to apply during the very end of summer or in the middle of the year when it's more likely, than not, that you'll be one of very few applicants who are available and apply.

    I wanted to share that as job hunting season for the 2018- 19 school year begins. I'm at the point now where I'm not even getting discouraged because I know that I can apply and have a job by summer's end. I have even been rejected by Arizona schools... it's true. There are some where they're not experiencing the teaching shortage like all the rest. I remember I interviewed for a position in Chandler and didn't get it. I continued to watch the postings and noticed the SAME job was re-posted. I reapplied and later in the summer they reached out to me and said, "Oh we had a 'new' posting'' and wanted to know if I was interested.'') I translated that to "We couldn't find anybody else and are now desperate... are you interested?'' If I get a job simply because a district is desperate and really need to fill a spot ASAP, I can handle that. It means I don't have to try that hard in the interview. That's less pressure for me. :sunglasses: And I can really tell when a district is desperate for a teacher: I can see it in their faces and hear it in their voices. It's a powerful position to be in!

    Moral of the story: DON'T GIVE UP HOPE!
    :heart:
     
  12. pommom

    pommom Comrade

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    Apr 22, 2018 at 12:23 PM

    I relate. I was hired in July for both of my teaching jobs even though I was applying and interviewing since April!
    Quick thought, don't schools consider teachers with actual teaching experience before college graduates?
    I think I would be ideal candidate to want to interview first because they won't spend too much of their budget on me since I have BA with just 2 years of teaching experience. Yet, I actually do have experience compared to college graduates. The only thing that may look bad is that I am not consistent in staying at a school even though I want to when I find the right position for me.
    The first school was private, and the pay was horrible. The one I am at now is at a public high school, which I am definitely not right for high school.
     
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  13. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Connoisseur

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    Apr 22, 2018 at 12:34 PM

    It really depends. I don't think there's a hard and fast rule for the districts. Some may want experience, others may want SPECIFIC experience (e.g. teaching kindergarten if the position is a kindergarten position,) others may care more about your education or how you interview or what references you have. Some may already know who they want, if they know somebody, making the interview process a formality anyway. And some may want to hire the fresh out of the gate college graduate as they are cheaper and more moldable to fit their needs.I applied last year in my home district and over heard a convo some of the teachers were having in which one teacher (the team lead and on the interview committee) say, "He has teaching experience in Arizona... that won't get you a job here.'' They hired ALL fresh graduates over me even though I had experience AND worked as a sub last year in the district I'm now in my second year subbing. Everyone was SHOCKED when they didn't hire me. You can't really play the "why didn't they pick me?'' game because you'll drive yourself insane. All you can do is apply and try your best in the interview... but then you can snag a job at the end of summer when those teachers, whom they were all excited for, back out at the last minute and now they call you desperate for teachers! :toofunny: It's like "Why didn't you just hire me in the first place?'' And it's becoming more of the norm now as millennials are the next generation of teachers. My friend was hired to teaching reading in Ithaca and I had applied for a position, but didn't get it. It was reposted at the end of summer and my friend said, "The person they hired didn't even bother to show up and quit at the very last minute'' like days before school was supposed to start. That creates a headache for them, but opportunities for us!
    Just be there and available if they call you.
    :thumbs:
     
  14. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

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    Apr 22, 2018 at 3:40 PM

    They also repost openings when their handpicked buddy or relative turns down the job. They had to post it, but knew all along they had a person mind. Interview 3 candidates and turned them all down. Then they look foolish when director’s cousin/sister/aunt decides to take another job. Nepotism runs rampant in the school systems. When a small district runs out of family members, they have to post the job.
     
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  15. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Connoisseur

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    Apr 22, 2018 at 3:42 PM

    :thumbs:
     
  16. rpan

    rpan Comrade

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    Apr 23, 2018 at 4:33 AM

    Your first job will rarely be the perfect teaching job or your forever school. I would accept the charter, and if it’s at will, I would sign it. If something better comes along, you are free to accept. The job may be imperfect but not necessarily completely horrible and it will provide valuable experience.
     
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  17. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Cohort

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    Apr 23, 2018 at 8:23 AM

    The charter emailed me and is willing to extend the offer until Friday. They also said they will be interviewing other candidates as well.

    I'm thinking of turning it down because I learned that...
    -Teacher hours are 7:30-4:30. This seems way too long considering I will have prep to work on after school.
    -Class sizes are 30-32 students. :(
    -I would have to start the school year on July 30th for PD...which is basically a month of unpaid work.
     
  18. TrademarkTer

    TrademarkTer Habitué

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    Apr 23, 2018 at 8:25 AM

    Yeah, sounds like a recipe for a bad first year, and some strong disillusionment for the profession. I'd avoid it.
     
  19. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Aficionado

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    Apr 23, 2018 at 9:18 AM

    Run away as fast as you can. Don't look back, either!
     
  20. bella84

    bella84 Fanatic

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    Apr 23, 2018 at 9:18 AM

    Honestly, I would still accept the job if you have nothing else lined up. It will give you experience to put on your resume, which may help you to get another job later on in the year or next year.
     

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