Job Hunt Frustration, Venting & Support Thread!

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Leaborb192, Jul 7, 2016.

  1. Teachertimes

    Teachertimes Rookie

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    Jul 13, 2016

    I attended a principals panel during student teaching and several of the principals told us, it isn't about not being good enough. The principal has to think about how each candidate will fit in with their team, how personalities will work together etc. They take a lot into consideration they want to make sure everyone will be a good fit. It's frustrating but keep your head up.
     
  2. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Connoisseur

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    Jul 13, 2016

    Exactly. The resume gets you the interview. Somebody took the time to look at it and say, "Hmmm... he seems like a good guy." Then you have to sell yourself in the interview trading on your experiences, networking and personality. In ANY industry, you're not just interviewing for the position but rather, they're trying to find out how you'd fit in with your co-workers. If they sense that you'd bring drama or don't really have the passion or enthusiasm, they don't want you. They don't want to waste their time with people who will just make more work for them or make the environment hostile. That said: people lie. In an interview it's what they do. So, I always just try to bring myself to the table, bluntly, and say, "This is me. And this is who you'll get." If they like me, great, if not, that's OK too. I'm not going to undersell myself out of desperation for a job because then I'd potentially be miserable too. I say be flexible but don't sell out your core beliefs to get a job, it'll only end up bad for everyone. After a lot of interviews, I'm slowly figuring that out. I look at it like speed- dating. You have a very limited window to present yourself and make an impression. And that's what I do. Find out who you are, what you believe in, and sell THAT to the admin!
    :):clapping::clapping:
     
  3. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Connoisseur

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    Jul 13, 2016

    So I interviewed for a job on Monday for a third grade position and got the call today inviting me to the second interview, which was the model lesson. However, I declined it and told them I was no longer interested in the position. I really liked the team that I had met at the interview and the school seemed great, but I quit my job to go back to school and since I had already postponed this plan a few times, I didn't want to withdraw again and have to pick up and move 3 hours south to start over. Even if I had rocked the model lesson and got hired, I don't know if my heart would be into it. It'd turn into just a "job" and I'd be very resentful. The job would have helped me in the short term, but this program will help me in the long run making me more marketable and opening up more doors. I look on the job boards and there are MULTIPLE Reading teacher postings per district all over the state and coupled with the experience I already have, it gives me a pretty good shot. It's a shame because I really did like the teachers, they all seemed really cool, we all laughed multiple times over my answers and then they kicked in their comments as well. It felt like we were already colleagues. But I came back home with an objective in mind.

    Now I'm just applying and waiting to hear from districts in my home town so that I could potentially work and still attend classes at night. I'll be back in the classroom in 2017- 18 as the reading intern so I just have to tough it out this year and rack up as many sub days as I can. But like I said my friend did call to tell me that she spoke with the Super about me so... :praying: maybe that'll lead somewhere. And there's a TA job fair at the end of the month that I signed up to attend so that could bear some fruits as well. :)

    Here's to hoping that it was a wise decision and will pay off.
    :D:spitwater:
     
  4. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Connoisseur

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    Jul 14, 2016

    Why does it matter how "old" my reference letters are? :mad::banghead: CALL THE PEOPLE! I assure you they are real, alive and willing to talk to you!
     
  5. mckbearcat48

    mckbearcat48 Cohort

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    Jul 14, 2016

    Anything to reject, right?
     
  6. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Phenom

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    Jul 14, 2016

    This is not directed at one person- just an observation over the course of the past month or so.

    Please don't apply for jobs you won't accept. Think long and hard before clicking that button. Applying is hard work, so only apply at schools who are an acceptable distance for you, and have content and grade levels you are interested in. Don't apply for openings just because they are there. Getting a job should require more thought than a shopping addict buying something just because it's on sale.

    We interviewed a great guy last year for our team and he was offered the job. Two or three weeks later he decided he didn't want to move to the area. I won't lie. The interview committee was livid. He wasted our time, got us excited that he was going to join us as he seemed like a great fit and even though he was inexperienced, we thought he'd turn out to be a great teacher. Then we had to start over with the process as our second choice had already accepted another job. The person eventually hired for that position missed a training the team attended not offered by the district and had to play catch up all year so we had to step in and do extra work all year.

    The world of education is very small. I don't know exactly what happened with the man, but I do know he interviewed with a friend of my P (two hours away), and she told the interviewing P that the candidate didn't keep his word. Whether he got hired or not, I was not interested in knowing. That just came up in conversation months later. I don't know how the Ps came about talking about candidates, but evidently it came up.

    If you are willing to move, apply! Best wishes to you! If you are willing to commute, apply! Best wishes to you! If you're willing to change content areas or grade levels, apply! Best wishes to you!

    But please, don't waste people's time.
     
  7. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Connoisseur

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    Jul 14, 2016

    At least the lady was nice enough to tell me that after I had nudged with a gentle reminder to see if they had received my application materials because the deadlines are approaching. But yeah if I hadn't, who knows?
     
  8. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Connoisseur

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    Jul 14, 2016

    To play Devil's Advocate: the candidates probably have good, honest intentions of accepting a job and moving (if needed) at the time of the application but that interest wanes as they have to wait weeks, or in some cases, MONTHS to hear back from a school. Most people aren't going to sit around after an interview and wait by the phone for the people to call back. If they don't hear within a reasonable time, they probably lose hope, move on and start applying elsewhere or pursue other plans. Districts need to understand this and respect people's time if they want that respect to be reciprocated. Yes, you're looking for the "right" candidate and it takes time, but people are also looking for jobs and will reject an offer to take another if they have to. If the Districts would speed up the process a little, things like this may not happen as much.
    I'm not going to lie: I'm losing hope with a lot of jobs I applied to. And I just pulled my name from consideration after being invited to the second interview because I realized that my heart wasn't in it. I suppose if you do decide to withdraw, do so as soon as possible.
    I don't think people apply to jobs just "because" with the expectation of rejecting them later. The job hunt is a process but again when it takes forever, life happens and people change.
    :)

    That's a +1 for AZ as the process, for me, happened at break neck speed. I applied, interviewed a few days later, and was offered a contract by within a 1-2 week time frame. They don't play around: they need teachers and need them FAST! If they can lock down teachers, they will. So far in NY, it's been like molasses... SO SLOW! :confused:
     
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2016
  9. mathteachertobe

    mathteachertobe Cohort

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    Jul 14, 2016

    My district is in a very expensive area. People with local addresses are MUCH likelier to get interviews because out-of-town candidates don't yet realize they can't afford to live here.
     
  10. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Phenom

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    Jul 14, 2016

    The job opening, interviews, job offer and acceptance in the case I was referring to was in about a three week time period. Most of that was the ten business days of job posting. The interviews were on the same day. The offer and acceptance was made the day of the interviews.

    Your reasoning works for many cases, but it didn't in the incident I referred to. I do certainly agree that the process should be faster in what I've witnessed on this forum. In my experience, the offer is the same day as the interview. More places should adopt our speed.
     
  11. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Connoisseur

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    Jul 14, 2016

    YES! Where do you teach? Generally speaking, based on anecdotal evidence, they're faster to pick up teachers in Arizona where they're more desperate (because there's a billion openings) especially at the end of summer when the school year is about to start and they still have vacancies vs. New York where there's one or two and they really want to put candidates through the wringer to make sure that they've selected "the one."
     
  12. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Phenom

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    Jul 14, 2016

    Texas
     
  13. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Connoisseur

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    Jul 14, 2016

    teacherintexas? (totally failed to notice your name) HAHA DERP! I only teach small children how to read. Woops!
    :cool:
    Do you recommend it? When I attended a job fair the recruiter from TX was like chasing down teacher candidates shoving the $50K starting salaries in their faces. I taught in AZ, so is it at all similar? What do you like about it? Pros & cons? I'm back in NY for my master's, but hate winter, and probably won't stay beyond the program which ends May 2018.

    Thanks.
     
  14. Teachertimes

    Teachertimes Rookie

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    Jul 14, 2016

    MD has a fast turnaround if they are going to hire you. My county requires 3 candidates be interviewed for each position. In my experience they do not contact you if you were not selected. It is the absolute most frustrating experience. I interviewed at 5:30 pm on a Tuesday, the next morning I received my offer. Everyone else I know has also found out within 2-3 days.
    I think it is extremely unprofessional to not inform a candidate they were not selected. I found out via facebook, not once but twice that someone else was hired for a position and nobody contacted me to tell me.
     
  15. jadorelafrance

    jadorelafrance Comrade

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    Jul 14, 2016

    Do you think they do that in case the first choice backs out?
     
  16. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Connoisseur

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    Jul 14, 2016

    Or they tell you via snail mail weeks (or months) later. Just call or email me a few days after meeting me and let me move on with my life! Don't leave me hanging! Thankfully some schools do.
     
  17. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Phenom

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    Jul 14, 2016

    Not every place starts that high. You'd have to research the area you'd consider to see what the salaries are and check for real estate prices. Usually the places that pay more have a bit higher cost of living and more competition. I live in rural areas but have lived in the larger cities. Getting a little less pay is not a bad trade off for living in the country and typically not having the same problems urban districts sometimes have.

    I don't know much about teaching in AZ so I really can't compare.

    I live in the southern part of the state where a little ice on the roads will shut everything down! :) My brother lives in Ft. Worth and some years will get some snow. I haven't seen snow since I lived in central Texas and even then, there was only about four times that we got enough for it to stick.

    Texas is not a common core state. The specialists at the service centers tell us that our state standards are harder, but I haven't studied them so I'm not sure if that is correct.

    We don't have unions as we are an at-will state. The first year or maybe two for new teachers, you'd have a probationary contract and you can be let go without a long process or much documentation. After that, you get a term contract and I think it's harder for admin to fire you as they have to document problems. To be honest, I'm not positive on all of the specifics as I've never had those problems. I do know of a veteran teacher who was put on a growth plan. There are associations and even a powerless union that you can join for liability insurance and legal counsel.

    Our contracted work weeks seem to be longer than in some states. The last district was over 42 hours a week, not counting meetings after school. Up to fourth grade, class size is limited to 22, which seems large until I read about classes of more than 30 on this forum.

    I love visiting other states, but Texas is home.
     
  18. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    Jul 14, 2016

    It has been my experience that my state, Florida, offers jobs shortly after the interview. Many of the schools I have had experience with send out rejection letters as soon as the candidate has been chosen. Starting salaries are not that high, but neither is the cost of living. There are plentiful jobs in most parts of the state year round because so many people move here thinking they will find the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow. Consequently, many of our schools have a large homeless population and Title 1 status.
     
  19. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Connoisseur

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    Jul 14, 2016

    I seriously considered Florida. Then I watched all the videos. I don't know how I'd feel seeing an alligator walking around my backyard with a human hand in its mouth. OR stepping outside and seeing a python (or some sh**) slithering around as I try to get in my car!
    :dizzyxx:
     
  20. Bunnie

    Bunnie Devotee

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    Jul 14, 2016

    I think schools in NY know exactly what they are looking for when they want to hire a candidate. You very well know the market is extremely over saturated with teachers especially elementary Ed. Let's take out the "who you know" aspect, and there are still many jobs open. However schools tend to be picky. My school in particular has made some interesting choices when trying to hire. They will interview like crazy trying to find what they want, which is a person with experience who can teach and wants to work in a low income Title 1 school. They don't want newbies at all anymore. They keep interviewing to try and find that fit and have lost out on some candidates that were great because they took too long. So in the end they have to hire a new teacher because experienced teachers get snapped up quick and the school year starts.

    We have someone at our school they hired after the school year because a teacher left about a month before school started and they were picky. Unfortunately their vision of hiring the best candidate didn't happen. Mind you this isn't the only school I've seen do this.

    You have to see it from an admins perspective they want people they know will stay. Whether that's due to location, experience or whatever else factors they take that into consideration. So even a less desirable school in NY is going to take their time to hire someone and they don't inform people they didn't get the job until they lock down a candidate, if they did at all. I know my school has ran down 2nd and 3rd choices only to find out they've accepted other positions because they waited too long.

    Now top schools in good districts don't wait around. They do multiple rounds and select the best candidate but they also get top applicants to come in. (The good districts that don't hire based on nepotism.)

    Now I will say when I was hired at my school the process was different for me, it took about 5 days from applying interviewing and demoing to being hired. But I was what they were looking for experienced and committed to working in Title 1. Other jobs I've gotten in NY were the same. One job I was offered on the spot. It's alol about knowing what they are looking for.
     

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