Is Overqualified a Reality or Myth?

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by Fleurdelis, Jun 21, 2017.

  1. Fleurdelis

    Fleurdelis New Member

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    Jun 21, 2017

    Hi all!
    I had what I thought was a wonderful interview for a part time theatre position. They seemed to like me, were impressed by my experience, questions and examples of my material I brought. The principal even told me I'd be hearing from them soon. That was a week ago, and in the on-line application there is an indication that I can neither apply or withdraw from the position, indicating to me they have filled the position.

    My background: 3 degrees (undergrad and 2 masters degrees in my subject area), and 5 1/2 years as a theatre educator in a professional theatre. Taking license in another state and materials have been sent in here.

    The other woman applying is younger than me. I'm going back after spending 3 years with my daughter.

    So either A)I'm overqualified, B) can't read an interview very well, or C) I just plain suck. Thoughts? I'm leaning towards C right now! (Haha-- sigh).
     
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  3. RainStorm

    RainStorm Aficionado

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    Jun 21, 2017

    D. They are looking for the person with the personality that will best mesh with the staff they already have on-board, who also meets at least their minimum qualifications.
     
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  4. RainStorm

    RainStorm Aficionado

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    Jun 21, 2017

    Generally speaking, every candidate they interview with meets the basic requirements. Often, they all have great interviews. Often, they all go home thinking "wow! That went well. I bet I'll get an offer." Unfortunately, there is usually only one job.

    You can do a great interview and be insanely-qualified, and still not get an offer. It very often has little to do with being the "most" qualified, or being over-qualified. It has to do with the very subjective things like personality, work style, etc. It has nothing to do with "sucking."

    Hang in there.
     
  5. Fleurdelis

    Fleurdelis New Member

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    Jun 21, 2017

    That is helpful. Thank you. :)
    I guess I didn't read the room as well as I thought I did. Back to square one.
     
  6. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

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    Jun 22, 2017

    Your undergrad is simply a qualification every teacher has, and the two master's degrees may be highly expected based on what you teach. Your experience is a plus, but you are going to need to find a district highly invested in the theater program to see all of your talent and abilities as a major asset. I think it will be a matter of finding the right job and the right fit. I wish you the best of luck.
     
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  7. GPC0321

    GPC0321 Companion

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    Jun 22, 2017

    It's possible that they think you're going to have higher expectations and plans for their theater program than they can realistically accommodate, and will therefore get frustrated and not stick around long. Which, I guess, is a long way of saying that you may be overqualified for their part-time position.

    Maybe the other applicant was dual certified and can teach in another area too, giving her more flexibility to become a permanent, full-time part of the staff?

    Who knows? But good luck to you! I wanted to be a theater teacher at one point. I actually went to school for theater education for one semester before quitting to take a job managing a horse farm (LOL...ahhh, it was fun being young). Wound up being an English teacher, which isn't too far from the original dream. I actually got to teach Theater for a couple of years too! But that ended when they insisted that everyone be "highly qualified" for whatever they were teaching. I could've taken the Praxes II in theater, but I probably wouldn't have passed (I have no real theater experience, I just like theater, LOL). The theater classes got cut eventually due to staff reduction. Very sad.

    You might want to consider seeing if you can add ELA/English to your certification.
     
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  8. Fleurdelis

    Fleurdelis New Member

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    Jun 22, 2017

    Good points GPC0321! Thank you.

    I taught elementary and high school teachers at a university to incorporate theatre games into their core subjects, and I touched on wanting to relate to the core curriculum in my interview. The principal mentioned several times she just wanted it to be "fun". (It's the only magnet arts elementary in the school district.)
    I do have an English certification, but that's my just in case.
    Oh well....
     
  9. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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    Jun 24, 2017

    Yes, you can be overqualified- my school will not look at applicants with a PhD. However, that doesn't mean that happened here. Perhaps they found someone who was simply a better fit.

    Good luck in your search. Hopefully something better comes along!
     
  10. Secondary Teach

    Secondary Teach Companion

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    Jun 24, 2017

    Are you certified in other areas or only theatre? You may be able to teach another related subject area such as English, Literature, Drama etc., along with Theater. Some schools have theater as an aftershcool program too. You could possibly teach at a school, and facilitate an aftershool drama or theater school. You've moved to a new state and applying for a license, so some problems might be that they're waiting until you finish your license in this new state or this new state you've moved may not many theater programs in this district which means fewer jobs to apply to and thereby creating an influx of candidates applying to those few theater jobs in the district. Stay optimistic.
    :)
     
  11. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    Jun 24, 2017

    When I've been on interview committees, I smile and nod at all the applicants just out of habit. I only noticed this after a fellow teacher asked how I could smile and nod at the applicant we had just had.
     

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