Inspirational Teacher

Discussion in 'General Education' started by mathmagic, Sep 13, 2017.

  1. mathmagic

    mathmagic Connoisseur

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    Sep 13, 2017

    Who was/is the most influential teacher for you as an educator? (i.e. your cooperating teacher when student teaching, someone you subbed for, a teacher you had as a kid that you emulate, etc...) How were they influential to you?
     
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  3. rpan

    rpan Comrade

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    Sep 14, 2017

    I'd have to say my math teacher in high school is the reason I became a teacher. He was firm but fair and he really knew how to teach the content very well. Maths wasn't the most interesting of subjects but he tried to make it fun by telling silly dad jokes and giving us riddles to solve. It was our daily ritual and helped us to form a good relationship with him. In the end I went from hating Maths to loving Maths.
    Today I do the same thing with my own students. I start off every lesson with a silly dad joke, even if I have a substitute teacher on, I make sure there's a joke for the kids every day.
     
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  4. mathmagic

    mathmagic Connoisseur

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    Sep 14, 2017

    Thanks for sharing!
     
  5. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Sep 14, 2017

    I quite love this topic, by the way!

    Some of the teachers I had in elementary and high school made me decide what kind of teacher I did not want to be! My positive influences have all been colleagues. I have been fortunate enough to work with some highly gifted teachers who have been willing to take me under their wing (even with years of experience, I can still be inspired). If I had to choose just one, I'd choose the teacher who mentored me during my first year in Special Ed. She not only knew the job inside and out, her caring and commitment to her students was what made her so effective. It's been almost 10 years since I worked with her, and, when I'm confronted with a challenge, I still think, "What would Janine do?"
     
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  6. Rockguykev

    Rockguykev Connoisseur

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    Sep 14, 2017

    AP US History teacher in high school. Super low key guy. Most students found him boring. I loved his wit and how he treated us like real human beings. He had no problem throwing a joke out there than 99% of the class wouldn't get. I always did and loved it.

    The best part was when my friend turned in a drawing for one of his essays and the teacher took the time to give him feedback. He noted how the tank my friend drew did not exist during the civil war in lovely red pen. It was glorious.
     
  7. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Sep 14, 2017

    I really loved my foreign language teacher back in the day. I had him from 7th grade through 12th grade, with the first year being a foreign language survey course and the rest being sequential courses in a single language. He was hilarious (in a dad joke sort of way), very passionate about what he taught (by that I mean both us students and the language), and extremely smart about many things. He combined his professional life and his personal life in an amazing way, often inviting us to his house for cookouts (as a group, along with our parents, everything on the up and up), bringing his wife along on out-of-state trips and conventions, and sharing with us details of his life in a way that wasn't attention-seeking or bragging but really just open and honest. I knew so much random crap about that man, like that his father was a tractor mechanic who played in a polka band on Sundays and that when he was young he and his siblings would sometimes have "boughten bread" on special occasions. He used those examples when teaching us grammatical constructions like predicate nominatives, apposition, relative clauses, and perfect passive participles, and I obviously still remember them today, many years later.

    What most inspired me about him was how really real he was about everything--his life, his experiences, his subject area, his family...everything melded into this one glorious thing. He loved all those things so much that it all just seemed to bubble over in the classroom, where he was engaging, patient, and so very successful in getting us to understand very (like, exceedingly) challenging material. He cared about us so much that he wanted us to love what he loved as much as he did, and many of us did. Several of us from our very small class went on to major in that language, and most of those people became teachers of it. It's a language that's not commonly taught, especially in public schools, but he educated a fair percentage of the people who are out there teaching it right now. If I go to the big annual convention and mention his name, everyone knows him and loves him. When I went to college on my very first day, they put me into a level 200 course for that language. After class, the professor asked me where I had studied the language previously and who my teacher was. Once he found out, he transferred me to a level 400 course with a different instructor, where I was this little freshman in a class of seniors, killing it. :)

    I don't know if I'll ever be able to bring to the classroom what he brings, but I think that I do bring my own special brand of something.
     

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