Inclusion

Discussion in 'Second Grade' started by mrs.oz, Sep 2, 2007.

  1. mrs.oz

    mrs.oz Companion

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    Sep 2, 2007

    Do any of you teach inclusion? I am a teacher but I have a personal parenting question. Please respond and then I will ask the question.
     
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  3. Shellbell601

    Shellbell601 Rookie

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    Hello! I have never posted before but I am a 2nd grade inclusion teacher. What can I help you with? :)
     
  4. mrs.oz

    mrs.oz Companion

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    ok, My son was tested last year and placed in an inclusion classroom. He did very well and got the helped he needed. This year he is also in an inclusion classroom. He has been in school 8 days and I am already having problems. He is ADD, sensory processing, and SLD (reading and language processing). I have had him tested at a nearby speech and language center where they have said that he is within normal limits in auditory processing but the report says that he scored low on background noise.
    I have already gotten a letter from the teacher saying that he is having trouble with completing assignments due to daydreaming. He has always been this way. She gave him a yellow dot for it. duh
    well he told me that she is playing music that bothers him. Also,
    yesterday he brought home a spelling test with a 92 on it. When I asked him why he said she threatened to give him a 0 if he did not get his test finished. To me, accomodations are not being made.
    The IEP says that tests will be read to him. you would think that his special ed teacher would be there during the test.?????? I don't know how to handle this situation or if I am in the wrong. Should he be able to function the way she wants him too.?????
    :confused:
     
  5. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Sep 2, 2007

    I'm a Special Ed resource teacher; I think the first thing you need to do is set up a meeting with the classroom teacher and the inclusion teacher. Discuss the IEP, the accommodations and modifications that are outlined in the IEP and that have been effective in the past, and find out about his program this year. It is still early in the year--they may still be "feeling" things out.
     
  6. jenglish97

    jenglish97 Devotee

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    Sep 2, 2007

    I agree with MrsC. I would definately meet with the teachers. You might want to clue in the Learning Consultant. I know that I always, tell my Learning Consultant about any issues or concerns I might have.

    A question that might be brought up is did last year's teachers meet with his current teachers? I know that I always meet withthe teachers that the children had last year to see what worked and if they had suggestions.

    You if you need to PM, please feel free. Good luck!
     
  7. Shellbell601

    Shellbell601 Rookie

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    I agree with the previous posters. By meeting with his teachers, you can bring up your concerns and probably get your questions answered. Because it is still the beginning of the year, I would see how things improve after speaking with the teachers. Hopefully, they will really appreciate a parent who is involved in their child's education. I know I always like it when parents have interest in their child's program. Definitely stress what his accomodations are on his IEP (especially about the tests being read) just as a reminder. I would express how you want your child to succeed and these are the things that worked last year etc etc. Also, I would bring up your concerns about how the teacher said "I will give you a 0 if you do not finish on time". That is a very unusual comment from a special ed teacher who needs to provide accomodations for students. Having extended time on a test is a very popular and useful accomodation that she should be familiar with. If you have any more questions, feel free to ask. Good luck!!
     
  8. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Sep 2, 2007

    In my building all classrooms are 'inclusion' classrooms-it's hard to imagine a teacher really anywhere who wouldn't consider themselves 'inclusion'. There is such a varied population of all kinds of learners in every classroom. An IEP must be followed. You need a conference with this teacher now. Try one on one with her first. If you get no satisfaction, call your son's case manager. It's still early in the year but you want to get this situation turned around NOW...
     
  9. mrs.oz

    mrs.oz Companion

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    Thanks everyone for your comments. I always feel like I should not step in or the teacher might feel I am stepping on her toes. I used to teach at this school. I plan on sending a note to the teacher about the test because she did not say why she took off the ten points and see what she tells me and then I may have to set up an appt. from there. The teacher that said this is not the special ed teacher but the regular classroom teacher. I have already called the school because my son is supposed to have a wieghted vest and a weighted pencil grip and the OT has still not given him his things. The principal said she would leave a note for the OT's.
     
  10. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    I have meetings during the first couple of weeks of school with the parents of all of my Special Ed students, whether they come out to me for Resource help or whether they stay in the regular classroom with modifications and accommodations. I dont' think you would be stepping on anyone's toes to just sit down and "chat" about your son's program this year.
     
  11. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    You'd think since you taught in the school once that they would go out of their way to accomodate you (and your son)--which they should do anyway for a kid with an IEP. Ask for an appointment with the case manager and classroom now- your son needs some OT things, his testing accomodations need to be made clear to the classroom teacher, as well as how his emotional well-being is as much a concern as his academics to you. Start off nicely sharing your concerns and asking for help. See how they respond. It's important that everyone is on the same page... If you aren't getting anywhere then stop worrying about stepping on toes...this is your kid. Go to bat for him. Make some noise if you have to, rattle some cages if you have to.;)
     
  12. mrs.oz

    mrs.oz Companion

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    Sep 2, 2007


    Thank you
     
  13. missred4190

    missred4190 Comrade

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    Sep 2, 2007

    I can't add anything to the advice you have given; I completely agree with it all. I wouldn't just send a note--speaking in person would eliminate any chance for confusion or misinterpretation. I have to say that with the push for inclusion, so many teachers aren't getting the training they need, and then things like this happen. They don't seem to understand how or why they need to make modifications or accommodations, and some don't seem to know the ramifications of ignoring IEPS or other needs, such as a weighted vest. I'm not saying this was ingnored in this case, it is just an example.

    I hope everything gets straightened out and soon so your son can get on the right track before any more school time goes by. Keep us posted!
     
  14. kpa1b2

    kpa1b2 Aficionado

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    Sep 3, 2007

    My 1st thought is, does the teacher know (& remember) the accommodations? At my school, it may take a week or more for the classroom teacher to get a child's goals & accommodations.

    As a parent of a child with an IEP, there have been times that I have had to have special meetings with the teacher in order to get the IEP accommodations met. 1 time it was because my daughter wasn't to be seated next to the window & that accommodation was overlooked by the teacher.

    I have also found that know that she's in High School, that those teachers don't know her accommodations and I have to make it a point to let them know.
     
  15. twincheryl

    twincheryl Rookie

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    Sep 3, 2007

    mrs.oz... I agree with all the rest. Get in there first thing tomorrow morning and schedule a meeting. Don't wait and certainly don't worry about stepping on toes. You, as the parent, are the best advocate for your child. Here in California we have many parents who HIRE a special ed advocate in order to get things done. The special ed team agreed to the IEP and they have the legal obligation to follow it. It's true that sometimes it takes a few days to get it all together, especially if you have a small school district that shares an OT or other services. At our school we have a brand new Sp Ed teacher who is really struggling on his own with no support from Admin. But it still doesn't matter... he's your kid and deserves what the team has agreed to. Best of luck!
     

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