Implicit bias

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Alexandra Belden, Dec 6, 2017.

  1. Alexandra Belden

    Alexandra Belden Rookie

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    Dec 6, 2017

    Hi fellow teachers!

    For one of my graduate classes I am writing a mock grant. I am writing about implicit bias in classrooms and how some teachers unintentionally hold this bias in the classroom regarding student's socioeconomic status and how much teachers see their students as eager to learn or discouraged from learning just by their work done outside of the classroom. My research throughout the semester has been related to this subject matter and I am now finalizing it all into one grant. My goal in my grant is to create programs for teachers and future teachers like me, programs to teach us how to provide sufficient resources inside the classroom and to create an even playing ground for all students. Research shows the success of students is directly correlated with how teachers perceive them inside the class. (I hope all this makes sense and I can clarify if needed) I was wondering if current teachers can provide me information on what they do inside their classrooms that help all students and whether or not implicit bias is real.
     
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  3. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    Dec 7, 2017

    Can you share the research your mentioned? About the correlation between teachers' perceptions and student success?
     
  4. Alexandra Belden

    Alexandra Belden Rookie

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    Dec 7, 2017

    The research I have found
    1. Teachers may assume that students seek help when they are struggling and also the reverse students who are higher-risk for struggling academically are often less likely to be seen asking for help
    2. Teachers may assume that students from certain backgrounds or social groups have differing intellectual abilities and/or ambitions. For example, a teacher might assume that a student from a certain background will be satisfied with lower achievement levels.
    An example I use a lot is you have two students. Student A and student B. Student A is in a middle to upper class supporting family while student B is in a lower class family whose parents work long hours. Student B therefore may not have the adequate resources to fully set him up for success and therefore cannot fully get their work done or not done correctly. Person A has resources at home and therefore can get higher quality work done. Not intentionally done by the teacher, the teacher is more prone to work with Student A with the belief Student B is not eager or willing to learn. When in fact Student B wants to learn and just doesn't know how to ask for the resources. However it is up to both student and teacher to help.

    Does that make sense?
     
  5. Been There

    Been There Companion

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    Dec 8, 2017

    Your response states two assumptions, but fails to include any research-based conclusions. Were these studies based on anecdotal observations? Educational research studies are often viewed with skepticism due to poor research methodology. Biased conclusions are often made based on results that are skewed by poor population selection, sampling errors and a variety of other qualitative and quantitative snafus. IMO, "sharing the research" means sharing the actual citations so that others can read the studies and assess the validity of the studies for themselves.
     
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  6. Alexandra Belden

    Alexandra Belden Rookie

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    Dec 8, 2017

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