IEPs

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by otsegogirl27, Nov 17, 2012.

  1. otsegogirl27

    otsegogirl27 Rookie

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    Nov 17, 2012

    I came here tonight after 2 failed IEPs to see how everyone's first IEP or two went... Honestly, I after college and grad school, I feel like I've never seen an IEP in my life. I am new to high school (muchless public schools) and new to transitional ages, and feel like I completely bombed my 1st two IEPs outside of grad school. I feel like an a--hole!! Can anyone relate???
     
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  3. waterfall

    waterfall Phenom

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    Nov 17, 2012

    I'm a little confused...did someone actually tell you that you did the IEPs wrong, or do you just think you didn't write them well? If a supervisor is not happy with them, you need to ask them to show you what they want or find out how you can get more training. Be proactive in wanting to improve. If you're just not feeling comfortable, ask another sped teacher to help you out or at least show you some good examples. I used to teach sped and I honestly had little to no training in sped (my college program was mostly gen ed, and I didn't do IEPs at all) so it was overwhelming at first. I learned a ton just by really looking closely at IEPs that had already been done the previous year at my school and modeling mine after that. I was the only sped teacher, but I was able to ask the SLP any specific questions I had and asked her to check things over that I wasn't sure about. She was a huge help!
     
  4. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Nov 18, 2012

    What are you having trouble with?
     
  5. ciounoi

    ciounoi Cohort

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    Nov 18, 2012

    Try to get your hands on a few IEPs that you can look over. That should help you get an idea of what they should look like. There are also several books out there about writing IEPs. One series a lot of people recommend is the Wrightslaw series.

    When you write an IEP, it might help to keep in mind that there's usually a typical flow you can follow. Before the IEP, all students need to have an evaluation or a reevaluation done. This document will give you information about the student's needs. Based on the listed needs in the eval and any other data, you can write your IEP.

    So if the eval says Johnny is able to read 60 words per minute at a seventh grade level but he's in ninth grade, you will want to write a goal saying that Johnny will get up to speed in his reading. You might write something like Johnny will read 90 words per minute at an 8th grade level as a goal. Your SDIs will list everything you think is appropriate to help Johnny reach his goals. Thus, you might want to mention in the SDIs that he will receive small group instruction, use a special reading program, test in a quiet area, etc to help him reach those goals.

    Hope it helps. :)
     
  6. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Nov 18, 2012

    Do you feel like you bombed the meeting or the writing of the document itself?
     
  7. otsegogirl27

    otsegogirl27 Rookie

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    Nov 18, 2012

    I don't think they were as bad as I think they were- but I have a good page or two of notes I need to go back in and correct. The second one has a bit less to fix than the first so I guess that's an improvement. I feel like I shouldn't be making these mistakes, but it's a lot of stuff in high school that I don't even know about yet. I feel like I need to build the plop a lot better, but am having a hard time since I've only known these kids for 11 weeks. My mentor looked over both IEPs and said they were fine, so I was a bit shocked at the corrections page. I'd rather them tear my first few IEPs apart so I can learn from them, I guess I just wanted to make sure I wasn't the only one who feels like I didn't do as good as I know I can.
     
  8. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Nov 18, 2012

    Each school district and school have different language, pages, settings, etc that they use. Make the corrections and learn from them. In time, these will become more second nature to you.

    For the plop, read the old evaluations and IEPs, you can get a lot of information from these.
     
  9. BumbleB

    BumbleB Habitué

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    Nov 18, 2012

    I have learned that it's best to be as specific as possible. It's better to overdo it on data, test results, etc than to skimp.

    Make sure you're keeping work samples for each kid. I just have manila folders with each student's name on them, and every time I grade something that correlates with their IEP goals, I stick it in there. When it's time for IEPs, I analyze the data I have collected. That gives me a lot to write about in the PLOP.

    You can also include grade level assessment data (if your school does common assessments), district level assessment data and state testing data.
     
  10. ecteach

    ecteach Devotee

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    Nov 18, 2012

    It's a learning process! I have been doing this for 7 years, and I still make silly mistakes. We have a compliance person who checks all of the paperwork. It's so rare that we don't have something to fix that my coworkers and I have a happy dance that we do if we get the "green light" to close the paperwork without making changes. lol
     
  11. Special-t

    Special-t Connoisseur

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    Nov 18, 2012

    I use the previous years PLOP and add new accomplishments or needs. Don't reinvent the wheel. By the time a student reaches high school the IEP is a fairly stable document.
    Do you have access to your caseload's prior IEPs? Use them as models. And I do as BumbleB. You can also ask other teachers to borrow assignments your students turn in so you can photocopy for their folders.
     
  12. Accountable

    Accountable Companion

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    Nov 18, 2012

    Welcome to high school! :haha:

    Yes the PLAFFPs are tough, but you don't have to build everything yourself (unless you teach all of the subjects). Contact their teachers and get their input. Our school has a form for this purpose. The teacher gives the strengths and areas of need, and you build any necessary goals off of those needs.
    Transition is critical as well, but you should be able to handle that with a couple of interviews and a visit to the counselor.

    I agree that I'd rather have a good thorough tear-up of my first couple of IEPs, rather than keep finding mistakes in IEP after IEP. Beat up on your mentor (verbally) too. ;)

    What software do you use?
     
  13. TeacherTori

    TeacherTori Rookie

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    Nov 18, 2012

    It is difficult to write them at first. I leaned heavily on experienced teachers for my first few. The good news with each one you write it will get easier and faster. It will start to feel more normal with each one. Does your district have a iep manual to show you how they want them written? That can become your best friend if they have it!
     
  14. Lisabobisa

    Lisabobisa Companion

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    Nov 19, 2012

    My previous experience was in elementary school, so I am also a newbie to transition plans. Thankfully the first one I did was for a senior, so I peeked at her old IEP, and tweaked the goals to better meet her needs this year. The next IEP was for a new student in need of a behavior plan... I used the ER, and peeked at an IEP of a student with similar characteristics to her to help me with the behavior plan. Of course, I had to tweak that to meet her need as well.

    We use Aims Web and a writing rubric for most of our academic goals, so that's pretty standard. We also have a transition coordinator who was a great in helping me with that part.

    I haven't gotten corrections back yet, but in the past, they have been sooooo helpful in better IEPs for the future. We're newbies! We learn as we go. =)
     
  15. FourSquare

    FourSquare Fanatic

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    Nov 19, 2012

    I think I'm on my 4th or 5th one! The system has become much easier to use, however that first one was a doozy. :haha: I wrote such terrible goals. I had to redo a bunch of it. You'll learn!
     
  16. geegee1981

    geegee1981 Rookie

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    Nov 19, 2012

    I learned how to manually write IEP's during my college program.....but when i wrote a real IEP it wasnt they same. My school uses the EASY IEP Program....It's pretty easy to use.
     
  17. Accountable

    Accountable Companion

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    Nov 20, 2012

    We use ESPED. It's really tedious, but it's the only program I've used so I don't have a frame of reference.
     

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