I need some help

Discussion in 'Preschool' started by Cris6, Oct 24, 2015.

  1. Cris6

    Cris6 New Member

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    Oct 24, 2015

    Hi, my name is Cristina. I have this group of 12 kids from 3 to 5 years old. One of the biggest issues I have to deal with is that my classroom doesn't have any desk or chair. Just some benches but they have to sit on the floor and I think that kinda makes them think that they're not in a real class. Anyway, it's just for an hour and most of them are pretty quiet and easy going, but there's this 5 year old who's driving me insane. I know he's a little boy but his behavior is the worst I've ever had to deal with. When they are painting, he takes all the crayons for himself and when I or his classmates ask him to share with them, he gets angry and screams, and he chases and hits them. No matter how angry I get, he doesn't respect me or the other kids. Yesterday he tore up another boy's drawing. Every time I send him to the corner for a while, he doesn't stay there and goes where the toys are and starts playing while kicking, screaming and insulting his classmates. He upsets the rest of the group and makes some of them nervous and then they end up misbehaving, too.

    I would appreciate some advice on this situation, thank you so much in advance
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2015
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  3. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

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    Oct 24, 2015

    I've mentioned this in earlier posts, but the best book I've ever read on this subject is No-Drama Discipline: The Whole-Brain Way to Calm the Chaos and Nurture Your Child's Developing Mind, by Daniel J. Siegel and Tina Payne Bryson, Bantam: New York (c) 2014. Ebook ISBN is 978-0-345-54805-4. Library nbr. is 649.1. Although it's written for parents, it's equally applicable to school settings. My only slight disagreement with the book is that I might emphasize (a bit more than the authors do) the importance of consequences, especially those that apply to established classroom procedures or natural/logical consequences.
     
  4. ChildWhisperer

    ChildWhisperer Devotee

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    Oct 25, 2015

    kids that age wouldn't know what a "real class" is anyway regardless of having desks/tables/chairs.
    If you & their parents keep calling it class/school/etc, they'll get it.
    Also, have you talked to that kid's parents about his behavior?
    And what do you mean it's only for an hour?
     
  5. Cris6

    Cris6 New Member

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    Oct 26, 2015

    Hello, thanks for your responses. The book sounds very helpful, thank you so much Obadiah.
    ChildWhisperer, I mean I only have one hour per day with this class.
    I haven't talked to his parents about his behaviour because I don't really know if I should. I see him with his parents and he acts like an angel. So I always back off because I'm afraid he will just deny everything. This is my first year as a teacher and I think I don't really know how to face this situation.
     
  6. ChildWhisperer

    ChildWhisperer Devotee

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    Oct 26, 2015

    Oh, do you teach a specialty class? How is it only for an hour?
     
  7. Cris6

    Cris6 New Member

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    Oct 27, 2015

    Yes, I teach Introduction to foreign languages, I try to teach them the basics in order to learn other languages. This is a new class and the kids are very little, but so far it's working surprisingly well!
     
    Last edited: Oct 27, 2015
  8. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

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    Oct 27, 2015

    Parents usually prefer to be informed. I've found it important to approach the parents in a positive manner; you are hoping to enhance their child's education, not complaining about their child. I'm assuming that parents who enroll their child in a specialty class are very concerned about his education. If a child that age precociously denies misbehavior, the parents are usually aware that he might do so.

    Students at that age who are older and bigger than their classmates might experiment with various social interactions. They do not perceive friendships as maturely as older students and therefore they are more egocentric than empathic. (Some psychologists would place empathy as an advanced childhood development. Personally, I find that empathy develops slowly as the child develops possibly beginning at these younger ages).

    A key to remember, that helped me first starting out--students will misbehave. You are not the one who is misbehaving; the child is. A misbehaving child is learning through experimentation and he needs to be redirected toward better ideas for social interaction.

    By the way, reading between the lines, it sounds like you are a superior first year teacher! You are seeking ways to solve problems and you are consulting your peers. You are evaluating and seeing progress in this new program. You are fulfilling a need at the school and I foresee you having much success in your career!
     
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  9. Cris6

    Cris6 New Member

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    Oct 27, 2015

    Thank you so much for your advice and your kind words. You sound very experienced and I think you're absolutely right. I should have a word with his parents in a positive manner, just to make them aware of the situation and try to work something out. Perhaps this behavior is going on in all the other classes too and they are already aware of it... All I want is him to behave and to pay some attention because I know he's very smart and when he does pay attention he can do things perfectly. But when he thinks it's time to misbehave, he does it big time. And this upsets his classmates and the environment gets awkward and I don't want that for my class, because I try to teach practical lessons, as fun and entertaining as I can.

    Thank you very much again, your words are extremely helpful and encouraging. As a first year teacher, I'm full of fears and doubts, and it's very frustrating for me not being able to control him and noticing that he doesn't seem to respect me. But I will definitely follow your advice and try to have a word with his parents!
     
    Osmara Alvarez likes this.
  10. Immerito

    Immerito Rookie

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    Oct 28, 2015

    At five years old, he's old enough to know better. Document his behavior and let the parents know. Model, model, model your expectations. He needs to learn to stay in timeout. Try to catch him being good (and the other kids). Put a star on a piece of paper. When everyone has earned "X" stars, do a silly dance for the last minute of your class.
     
    Last edited: Oct 29, 2015
    Osmara Alvarez likes this.

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