I have a problem!

Discussion in 'Preschool' started by mudpie1598, Nov 22, 2006.

  1. mudpie1598

    mudpie1598 Companion

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    Nov 22, 2006

    This was my 2nd week in a kindergarten class. I haven't set up my class Behavior chart or anything like that because I haven't made it. I just haven't had time. My student's aren't listening to me at all, they're all fidgety. About 3 of them, one of which has been diagnosed with ADHD and is on medication, the other two show signs of ADHD. These three boys will spin like tops on the floor. They'll lay down on the rug some of them will get up and wander the classroom as I talk. They all talk out of turn and will call out answers. They're all loud during center time.
    They're basically all running amuck!

    One of the boys that shows signs of ADHD tried to stick his finger in the pencil sharpener and keeps sticking his fingers in the printer. I keep telling him not to do it. I have talked to the mother and she doesn't know how to help him. She says she can't be strict with him. She looks really young. The previous teacher that had him says she lost her voice because she always "yelled" at him. I haven't "yelled" at him, but talk to him sternly. When he does things that he shouldn't he gets time out or I take recess time away from him, but that doesn't seem to help. Any suggestions?

    During math time, I do it as a group and explain what they have to do. When they go back to their seats about 10 of them come back to me to tell me that they don't know what to do. So, I have to re-explain to them what they have to do. I find myself repeating and re-repeating myself during math lessons. Is there anything I can do to remedy this?

    :eek:
     
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  3. teachingmomof4

    teachingmomof4 Groupie

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    Nov 23, 2006

    You said that you haven't had time to set up a behavior system...that is exactly what you need to do. You need to start in on Monday with a whole new system, set of rules and expectations, and be prepared to stick to those consequences no matter what. You need to show those kids who is in charge and that you mean business. You can still be fun but strict. I have never taught kindergarten but have taught first and second grades. I am not sure if this system would work for you but you could give it a try or tweak it a little to better suit you and your classroom.

    Get a big piece of chart paper with 25 pockets (or however many students you have) and write the students' names on the pockets. (You could have one for AM and one for PM.)

    Get a big box of popsicle sticks from the craft store and put them in a jar somewhere in the classroom that would be easily accessible to the students.

    Here is how the system works:

    1 warning: Child receives one warning stick.

    2 warnings: Child receives another warning stick and misses 10minutes of recess and has to write a reflection paper about choices

    3 warnings: Child receives another warning stick (3 total) and misses a recess and has to write a reflection paper about choices to take home and be signed by parents

    4 warnings: Child receives another warning stick (4 total) and visits the principal's office as well as misses recess


    Being that your children are younger than mine, you may have to do things a bit differently but that is the gist. It really works well to the point where all I have to say is, "Who wants a stick?" and the room goes silent. My kids also get weekly behavior slips sent home that show what level the students were on each day of the week.

    I would be careful about assuming that students have ADHD unless they have been diagnosed. Yes, some kids do exhibit those type of behaviors but not everyone who acts that way is ADHD. She was calling me the first week of school saying that he was having difficulty following directions and that out of the 52 kids she had (both classes), he was the only one who couldn't sit still. I found that very hard to believe. We then took him out of that classroom and put him into a private school where he did very well. My son was very "energetic" when he was in Kindergarten so much so that his K teacher said that he would be better off repeating K to build his social skills. When we moved, we started him in K again and he was bored. We moved him to 1st grade, where he was supposed to be, and he still was "energetic" but getting better. To make a long story short, he is now in the 6th grade and every teacher's dream. He scores on or above 95% in each subject area, does all of his homework on time, participates in class, follows directions, and goes above and beyond what is expected. His teacher adores him and is very proud of him. His teacher's wife (who is also a teacher next door) feels the same way.

    So needless to say, kids are not always that way. Please know that ADHD is not a diagnosis for everyone.:angel:
     
  4. palm

    palm Rookie

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    Nov 23, 2006

    behavior charts

    I've been teaching for several years and lately have noticed new teachers using "Behavior Charts" that seem to have the capacity for only catching bad behavior. It seems each time the child misbehaves they go "lower" on the chart or their color changes. They all start out at the same level but instead of "going up" or being praised for good behavior the emphasis seems to be put on "moving your name down". I've seen particular children in these new teacher's classrooms really start to misbehave more as they feel they are always "bad". I've also seen power struggles arise as the child must go to the chart and move the card themselves. They have the entire classroom's attention and can really act out at this point. The whole process seems counterproductive and time consuming. Actually taking away from time that could be spent instructing. Consequences should be handled in a just manner and I hope the emphasis of rewarding good behavior is not over-shadowed by catching the bad behavior all the time. The child eventually starts to think they're "bad" and what's the point in behaving. Please be careful with this approach!
     
  5. QueenStar9

    QueenStar9 New Member

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    Nov 23, 2006

    Try catching him being "good". We tend to focus on the negative and that doesn't help them learn the behavior we want. If he sits nicely for 2 minutes, catch him and let him know that you noticed him sitting. THe more you do that, the more he will look to get that kind of attention. We also send out "happy gram" which are little notes on special paper (happy face paper works best!) telling the child something happy. They light up when they see them in their mailboxes!
     
  6. mudpie1598

    mudpie1598 Companion

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    Nov 23, 2006

    Hi, I said that 2 other boys are showing signs of ADHD, because one of the boys was referred by the previous teacher whom he had about 2 weeks ago before I came in. The class I have is comprised of children who became the overflow after each teacher had 20 children. This is why they opened up another class. His previous teacher is a more experienced teacher than I am. Possibly teaching about 7 years, where in comparison this is my first. She mentioned that he exhibited signs of ADHD in her classroom, so much that she constantly "yelled" at him. He was been refferred to the school's RSP (resource specialist) and the school's guidance counselor. I'm a bit weary on whether or not this is the problem because when his mom comes in he's a good boy, he behaves. So, when I said that he shows signs of ADHD it is because this is what I have been told by the previous teacher and referral staff.

    He has a meeting scheduled with the SST and the previous teacher is supposed to speak and tell us why she thinks he needs to be referred to the school's RSP teacher. All I can say is that something is definitely wrong and as a brand-new teacher I don't know exactly what to say. I'm supposed to work on a one-on-one contract with him and see if his behavior improves before the meeting. The second boy is exactly like him in behavior and I think I have to set up a behavior contract with him as well. Thank you for the Behavior Management system idea. I will try something similar to that.

    Now, the boy who is diagnosed with ADHD and is on medication, how can I help him maintain focus on the lessons? This seems to be a big problem with him.
     
  7. teachingmomof4

    teachingmomof4 Groupie

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    Nov 23, 2006

    I do agree that you should praise children for being good and catch them as often as you can. In fact, I give out stickers, candy, and other small treats randomly when students are "caught being good." Along with my stick chart, I have a prize box that the students are allowed to choose from at the end of the day, as long as they haven't gotten a warning stick. If a child has received a warning stick for the day, and his/her name is chosen to choose from the prize box, s/he does not choose nor does that person take home our class "pet" and journal for the evening. All in all, the system works well for my class, even for those kids who are repeat offenders. If not, then I find something else for that person that will work. In fact, I have two boys who are on a totally different system that works for them.
     
  8. mudpie1598

    mudpie1598 Companion

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    Nov 23, 2006

    What system do you have for the two boys?
     
  9. teachingmomof4

    teachingmomof4 Groupie

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    Nov 24, 2006

    It is called Pre-correct. Our counselor comes in each morning and meets with them individually to set a goal for the day as well as discuss what happened the previous day. They are to focus on the goal and I rate them on a scale of 1-6 for the same behaviors throughout the day. They are rated in the am and the pm. The behaviors are:

    1. Staying in the assigned area.
    2. Using appropriate tone and language
    3. Followed directions with no reminders
    4. Does assigned work in class and stays on task
    5. Keeps hands and feet to self
    6. Participates in class


    *I am not sure if these were part of the program and she just used them or if they are ones that she thought of herself. Both of the boys have the same sheet and we just put their names at the top.




    If they receive 6's on their sheet, they get $10; 5's are $5; 4's are no money; 3's and anything below, they owe money (not sure how much). At the end of the week, the counselor takes them, along with anyone else who has earned the celebration to her room to have games, food, and fun. The kids have to buy the food and the things that they want to do at the celebration. Each item costs a certain amount and they can buy it, depending on the amount of money they earned for that week. They start over each week fresh.

    It really seems to work well. One of my boys is really "tough" and acted as though he didn't really care about it. I asked if there would be any way he could go (when he was first put on this system) so that he could see what it was that he was working for and hopefully become more motivated to earn it. He wasn't able to do everything there but was at least able to see the possibilities. He has since been working much harder to earn that goal.

    Although they don't get the celebration every week, they are both doing a lot better and making all of our lives more manageable. (most of the time:D )
     
  10. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    Nov 24, 2006

    I use the froggie consequences that I got from this one website. I die cut these frogs, one for each kiddo. I have a happy frog, sad frog, and a crying frog. Before a child has to move thier name, they get a warning in the form of a choice. My students know that they have the choice to behave and learn, or misbehave and use thier recess time to learn how to behave. They always choose the first. For example, if a student is twirling around on the carpet, then I will say "Jane, you are not making good choices. You are breaking my rule number 2. You have a choice, you can sit like everyone else is sitting, or you can practice sitting on the carpet during your recess time." Remember, some kids may not know exactly what you want of them. You need to model and model and model. And if kids misbehave, then I will show them what I want. Do you see how John is sitting on the carpet with his hands in his lap, criss cross applesause? At this point of the year, all I need to do is just look at them, or say, rule number ____.

    froggie pictures for behavior
    http://www.mrsnelsonsclass.com/downloads/pdf/classmanagement/behaviorchartfrogset.pdf


    To reward kids who behave well:
    I praise them, let them go out a little bit early to recess, get to carry an extra book to the library that I checked out, gets a special smelling hand stamp at the end of the day. I don't focus too much on extrinsit rewards such as stickers or candy because I want them to be good for the sake of being good, not to get goodies. I read somewhere that some teachers are causing kids who are good for the sake of being good to now be good for the extrinsic rewards. Be very careful how to reward good kids!
     
  11. teachingmomof4

    teachingmomof4 Groupie

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    Nov 24, 2006



    Yes, you do want kids to behave because it's the right thing to do. However, most kids, especially younger ones, are not able to do that just yet. You said that you don't focus too much on the extrinsic rewards such as stickers or candy but isn't carrying an extra library book, getting extra recess, and a hand stamp an extrinsic reward? They are just different types of extrinsic rewards.

    I don't focus on those either but I do recognize those that are following directions all of the time and let them know that I appreciate it. I only give out the stickers and candy on rare occassions. Most of time, I "reward" them by saying, out loud to the class, "When you are ready, you will look like________," or "Thank you, __________, for always being ready to go." They love to have me say their name in a positive way such as that.

    I agree that you shouldn't focus on extrinsic rewards, in fact the system we have at our school (Raise Responsibiltiy) wants kids to be more instrinsic but, it is okay once in awhile. We are all human and even as adults, we enjoy getting extrinsic rewards or material things for our efforts. It's part of our nature.
     
  12. mudpie1598

    mudpie1598 Companion

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    Nov 24, 2006

    I work in an inner city school with Kindergartners. Believe it or not the kids can be tough here. The only way I can get them motivated is to give them a reward. Students weren't raising their hands, kept calling my name out, and kept coming up to me and flashed their papers 1-inch away from my face. I tried everything, like reminding them not to get up, to raise their hands, etc. Nothing worked. So, I used stickers as my currency and it worked like a charm. I no longer had to remind those students who were not displaying appropriate behavior. I awarded students who were displaying appropriate behavior the stickers and I said, "Wow!!! _________ you're doing such a great job of raising your hand... you didn't get up... you quietly/patiently waited for me, Thank you!" The other students caught on and I had students who were not raising their hands correcting their own behavior later on in the day, "Oooops! sorry I forgot to raise my hand" or "Oooops! I wasn't supposed to get up (they'd walk back to their seats and wait for me to call on them."

    This worked for me!
     
  13. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    Yes, I agree, that's why do those those rewards I mentioned, not to mention the ones that you said you do in your class. I very much agree with you. I read somewhere in one of my teacher maganizes about the AR points that kids get when they read those AR books. This article talked about how it does get those kids who would not normally read, now reading because they get those points. But, kids who normally do read for the intrinsic part are now reading for the extrinsic reward, points. So, that's what I meant when I said we need to be careful about rewards.
     
  14. teachingmomof4

    teachingmomof4 Groupie

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    Nov 24, 2006

    Got it. :D
     
  15. kimrandy1

    kimrandy1 Enthusiast

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    Nov 25, 2006

    I use a stop light system. It's easy because the kids generally know what a stop light means (green=go, yellow= slow down, red= stop.). Each day, each child starts out with his/her name on the green circle. If you are misbehaving, you have to move your name to the yellow, and that's an immediate time out. If you don't improve, you have to move it to the red, which means a loss of playtime and a note/call home. If you keep on misbehaving, you're in a "car crash." I have a picture of a car hanging above the whole stop light chart. If you move your name there, you go to the office. All of the kids names are on clothespins that clip to the circles/car. If they are on the yellow, and they improve drastically, they can move back to the green. At the end of the day, all kids who are on the green may get a sticker on their folder...or maybe not. I save that as a surprise for when I really need to make a point.

    Have you tried singing or chanting? I find that if I use transitional songs, my kids immediately perk up. I sort of make up words to common tunes, like London Bridge. One I do a lot goes: 1.2.3, eyes on me, let's see who is ready now. Your legs are crossed, your lips are closed. Everyone is ready to learn. No rhyme or anything, and I can't name the tune it goes to. I also do, "If you're ready and you know it, clap your hands (or blink your eyes, stick out your tongue, whatever), and Everyone is ready now, ready now, ready now, everyone is ready now, because I see your eyes (to the tune of Mary Had a Little Lamb).

    As for the other two boys who are exhibiting symptoms of ADHD, it is quite possible that they are copying the behavior of the one child, and doing it in order to get your attention. Definitely set up a seating chart for the rug and split those three far apart!
    Kim
     
  16. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    You do want a good system in place but keep in mind if it is only your second week, you will need time to get to know the kids and find out what motivates them and what works and doesn't work. There is always a trial period.
     
  17. mudpie1598

    mudpie1598 Companion

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    Nov 26, 2006

    I like this green, yellow, red light system, thank you.

    The chants will work like a charm, I appreciate you telling me about them. Thanks!:D
     

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