I HATE this job because...

Discussion in 'Teacher Time Out' started by teaching-is-hell, Apr 27, 2017.

  1. teaching-is-hell

    teaching-is-hell New Member

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    Apr 27, 2017

    - my boss is an angry, power-thirsty moron with zero people skills
    - there are too many kids to teach that have not been raised to respect adults
    - there are too many kids with horrible home lives that bring that to school and we are expected to maximize their potential
    - there are TOO MANY KIDS in my classes!
    - there are too many parents that choose their child's side (they think we are the enemy)
    - the system is convoluted, sloppy and inefficient - run by fools that aren't in the classroom
    - legislators and administrators don't care what teachers think; they pretend to
    - there is too much BS paper work that is meaningless and time-consuming
    - there are too many changes and usually they are recycled and/or poorly-planned, unvetted ideas
    - too much money is wasted on worthless professional development speakers and workshops
    - there are too many teachers walking around in misery b/c they chose the wrong job and are stuck in it for a variety of reasons, or they are just holding on until retirement
    - colleges hide the truth about teaching from their students - they make it seem like a fluffy, blissful vocation (it's not)
    - full inclusion is not good for anyone but the SPED kids and that is not right; what about the gifted students, do they not matter?

    I could go on, but that's enough for today.....

    Got some of your own to add to the list? Let's hear why you HATE and REGRET your decision to enter this thankless profession!

    DISCLOSURE: I am planning on leaving after this year or next, depending on the financial situation of my family. When I hang it up, I will have 9-10 years in. I don't care about the pension or the summers anymore. It is obvious these are key factors in why people stay when they hate it. But, I've had enough of being a slave to a broken system that every year gets worse in some way. I'm tired/ I'm tired of the interuptions, change for the sake of change; tired of stress and disrespect from students, admins and parents. I feel unvalued, and I am constantly unhappy. I'm out.
     
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  3. mathmagic

    mathmagic Connoisseur

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    Apr 27, 2017

    It's a difficult job. There's lots to do. Yes, some teachers (thankfully not me) are in tougher working environments in terms of staff/administration. Am I stressed? Am I falling asleep on the couch by 7 or 8 on Friday? Yes, of course. I address what I have control over, and don't let myself constantly focus on those areas in which I cannot control.

    I choose a positive outlook, though. I'm here for the kids. No matter what else happens around me. If there are things I feel I can advocate for change that will make it better for the kids, I do so, while continuing my focus on doing the best I can, 8:30-3, and as I plan/work before/after those times, on giving these kids the best education possible. Naturally, my happiest time of the day is during that time, because it's then when I'm having those impactful moments.

    At the end of the day, I see the growth mindset that the kids are developing, all the reading they're doing, the learning that's taken place in math, the growth as writers, their kindness they exude, their ability to focus and work as a classroom community as opposed to individuals...and as much as I felt like I didn't get to, didn't cover, didn't 100% take care of, time I spent in the evenings, paperwork I filled out...I realize that I've made an impact, and that prevents any chance I could ever hate this job.

    (All that being said, I fully respect your decision to leave the profession, and truly hope that your stress level and enjoyment of your future job works out for the better. Best of luck!)
     
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  4. teaching-is-hell

    teaching-is-hell New Member

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    Apr 27, 2017

    Thanks for the response. I wish I had your positivity and ability to find the good in every situation. I know that experiences vary based on one's school environment. To put it bluntly, mine sucks. That begins with the skill-deficient temper-tantrum boss I have whose dismal personality poisons the whole community. But that is not it all; to be completely honest, I really don't like teaching my students anymore. It really is the kids, more than anything. If I could eliminate the 20% that have bad attitudes, big emotional issues and just an overall disrespect for all of us adults that bust our asses for them, only teach the 80% that are kind, respectful, engaged and care about learning then I think I would enjoy it more and find promise in what I do.

    The system is broken; it is rotten; oppressed by DC and the state gov't. It keeps getting worse. I wish I could be more positive (believe me, once I was like that and every new year I try to start fresh with an energized mind, but by mid-year I am miserable again). The grind has finally take its toll; I'm worn down.

    God bless all of you that find joy in this profession, work hard for less than you deserve and are in the trenches taking the perpetual punches and getting back up to fight on behalf of our students. My hat is off to you. I, for one, cannot make this a lifelong endeavor.

    I am wiling to forgo my pension and summers to roll the dice on another profession to find something less stressful, respected and one in which financial upward mobility exists, unlike the max earnings cap that we are boxed into.

    Good luck to all that continue the fight. Nothing but respect for you. You are what the kids deserve. Thank you for your willingness to fight the good fight, whatever your reasons may be.
     
  5. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    Apr 27, 2017

    It sounds like you would be amazing in a corporate training position, if you want to get out of the school system completely. Going by your handle, I'm guessing that's the case. Have you looked into that?
     
  6. creativemonster

    creativemonster Comrade

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    Apr 30, 2017

    I hear ya. I have to ask myself continually why I am letting those 20 (for me about 7) percent of students get to me. I have talked to other teachers at my school about this. My administrators have no clue, and tell me phrases of bs that make it sound like its so easy, but other teachers have been VERY helpful. Why am I letting them (those handful of students) get to me? If I focus on my other 93 percent, then the job is far more rewarding for me. Easier said than done, but I try to work on it - especially because I can not afford to leave the profession. I actually get joy and energy from those 93 percent.
    As for the parents - wow - I don't know, I have not had this issue, but I will ask a question that has come up at my school - do you ever make positive phone calls? I don't mean fake bs ones to the bad kids, I mean real positive calls to the parents of some of the good kids' parents/guardians. just quick positive calls. It might help to see that at least some parents see teachers as part of the team. And these calls don't take as much time as the negative calls. and the pay off is huge. As for the administrators, lousy meetings, the politics, and everything else that rots about our job, yeah, don't know. I have accepted (to a point) the limits of my job. I am still learning all of that. (been in over ten years) I try to let some of it roll off me, close my door, do my job. But yeah, you are not the only one with all of these frustrations. If I didn't have those other 80-93 percent students, I would find another job. But they, for me, make it completely worth the other garbage. keep breathing, stay healthy, and hey, this year is almost over!
     
  7. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Apr 30, 2017

    Rise above it. There will always be new standards, tests, evaluations, i.e.: hoops to jump through. Either you develop a growth, can do mindset and navigate the bumps in the road or you wallow in miserableness influenced by the negative mindset of others. Life is too short for that. We ARE called upon to be there for the kids in more ways than just academically. I'm not sure that's a new phenomenon. And parents, yeah, they can be an issue but if you build positive proactive relationships and always convey that you have students' best interests at heart, it makes a HUGE difference. Same thing with admin. Be professional, cordial and on your game. As far as PD, some is better than other offerings, but there is ALWAYS something to learn and ways we can improve. Embrace that opportunity. And if you really can't do any of this, education might not be for you.
     
  8. SageScience

    SageScience Companion

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    Apr 30, 2017

    I was where you are now. I left and the negative feelings faded with time. While I never returned to the classroom, I found education jobs outside of the classroom that have been great opportunities for me. Someone suggested corporate training. That's a good suggestion. Check out "Instructional Design" as a career, too. The people that I know who have left education altogether work as insurance claim adjusters, purchasing department (for a corporation), sales and marketing, administrative office job, translating, instructional design / corporate trainer, or teach higher education.
     
  9. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Apr 30, 2017

    I'm leaving next year as well. I've gotten pretty negative about my job and it's clear to me that I need to leave before that becomes permanent or before it begins to affect the kids. I'm still trying to at least "fake" positivity though (at least faking is what it feels like) because I know that's the secret to keep from going insane and being there for the kids. This year has been a test though. You say you have 80% that are there to learn; I'm afraid at my school it's flipped. Only about 20% of them are there to learn, and the rest are simply there because the government requires them to be and they (and their families) see zero value in education, and it's their bleak outlooks on life despite my encouragement that depressed me more than anything. I work in an impoverished rural community where our suicide rate is through the roof because most of them grow up and realize that they can't get a job and live well without that education they decided to squander.

    I'm still doing my best to build relationships with them, and "like" them as my students even if I think that they're making terrible choices, so I can try to influence them, but my efforts have had only superficial results.

    I'm glad it's almost done, and I'm going to be moving into a job where I don't have to be quite so "on" all of the time.
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2017
  10. rpan

    rpan Companion

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    Apr 30, 2017

    Sometimes the impact we have on our students may not be apparent until years after they have left our classroom and we may never know about it. We may not feel that any learning is being done by the 'good kids' because of the other negatively behaved students but we never know. They may not learn content but they are watching and observing us, how we conduct ourselves, how we encourage them, how we try despite the obstacles, our can-do attitude, how we treat other students with respect, our patience etc. They may not be learning content, but they sure are learning something. If a student has seen something positive in us they want to be when they grow up, we have done our profession proud.
     
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  11. VictoriaF

    VictoriaF Rookie

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    May 3, 2017

    Oh man. I'm a non-teacher, new to this forum and just graduated with my Bachelors in English. My plan has always been to teach English. Since I'm not there yet, it seems like a far-off dream. What you've described is what I'm so afraid of! I'm old enough (31) to know the bureaucracy that infiltrates the teaching profession. I've also seen firsthand the "worn down-ness" of teachers after the first couple of years (my partner is in his 5th year). This is why I am scared to invest in an education program for education...because I may not even like teaching. :confused:
     
  12. mathmagic

    mathmagic Connoisseur

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    Just don't let the bureaucracy become a big focus of yours. While that's obviously harder in some places than others, even within my own school, I can definitely tell those that focus more on the love of driving student growth, and those that allow the bureaucracy frustrations creep in more, and it makes a world of difference in the attitude towards teaching.

    You might also consider trying out some small bits of teaching - try tutoring, helping at a childcare, volunteering in a classroom, etc...
     
  13. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    May 5, 2017

    Teachers are definitely burnt out much sooner when they're still in their yrs 1-5 of teaching. Long ago, teachers wouldn't get burnt out until maybe about 10 yrs. I didn't teach special ed for very long myself because even it's not like it used to be when I started going to school for it.

    I switched to a career field (SLP) in which I can still work in the schools, but also other places as well and I'm not working with a whole classroom full of kids all day. I like the nice, small groups. However, speech student caseloads have gotten way worse over the years. It's very difficult to find a position that has less than a 60 or 65-student caseload at any one school, PLUS, that's IEP meetings for ALL of them and the assessments and IEP writing that go along w/ it on top of some of the things that the OP listed above. Also, many SLPs are assigned to 2 different schools and they may or may not have aides. I was an SLP for 3 yrs & I've been taking a break from it. I still gotta do this requirement, so I've got to see how things go.
     
    Last edited: May 5, 2017
  14. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Fanatic

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    May 6, 2017

    How is it good to focus on the thorns on the rose instead of the beautiful flowers? I am not sure this is a helpful post to any teacher.
     
  15. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    Previous posts that called out each other have been removed due to mutual request. Let's keep it professional, folks.
     
  16. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Even though I'm burnt out now, I would say that the experience was still definitely worth it for me at least. Not every year was as terrible as this year was. My previous few years were awesome. But I had other plans as well. I still value the good times, even though I know it is now time to leave.
     
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  17. Guitart

    Guitart Rookie

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    May 7, 2017

    I left my previous career for many of those reasons and entered education. For over 15 years I was in I.T. When I started, it was a job that needed, respected, and valued your expertise. Those were days of Novell servers, Blackberry, AOL & dial-up internet, and Microsoft & Cisco certification were impressive credentials. Eventually, Best Buy, Windows 95(and later versions), Wireless, Internet and Smartphones turned average end-users into shade-tree I.T. experts and hackers overnight. My last I.T. position I was hired for my years of experience and knowledge of hardware/software. Within a year I discovered my expert opinion, prior experience, and common sense was not valued. I was a monkey pressing a mouse, installing and supporting anything someone higher than me wanted. Independent thinkers were shown the door - and I was let go 4 years later.

    Now, I am in a profession where my life experiences, education, common sense problem solving skills, creativity, imagination, and ability to work independently are VALUED. I get observed and evaluated, but never micro-managed. I feel appreciated and respected by parents, students, and peers. I can go on..

    I know people can get burned out in their career or industry if all they experience are negative environments. I have some friend still working in I.T. that have moved on to some fun companies. Now they love their jobs. I work in a small, rural district. It is far less stressful than the large, urban environment I used to sub in. Now that I have worked both sides, I am happy with where I have landed.
     
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  18. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    May 7, 2017

    We need to buoy each other thru the tough times. Many early career teachers are overwhelmed and drop out of the profession or are non-renewed. Support from colleagues coupled with mentoring, coaching and meaningful PD make a huge difference.
     
    Last edited: May 7, 2017
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  19. ChildWhisperer

    ChildWhisperer Habitué

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    May 7, 2017

    Ah I have many complaints.
    But I know it's just my current situation, and not teaching in general, because I worked at a wonderful school before I moved here.
    So next year I hope to move on to another school or district and grade level.
     
  20. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    When your member name is 'teaching is hell' one is left to wonder if you are looking for reinforcement and justification for your personal opinion and experience. Yes, there are certainly very difficult and stressful work conditions in education. The same could be said for any job or profession. Environment and mindset make a huge difference. Rest assured, it's not hell everywhere. Not even in the majority of school districts. I wish you well
     
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