I did it. I resigned mid-year.

Discussion in 'General Education' started by akconnel, Nov 17, 2018.

  1. akconnel

    akconnel Rookie

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    Nov 17, 2018

    Several of you have given me advice on this situation and I appreciate it so much. Now I want to post my story so if anyone ever searches, like I did, for someone who knows what they are going through they will have my account. Maybe it will help.

    This year has been a nightmare. I was handed a boxed curriculum that was awful and told I must do those lessons. The lessons were so bad I had behavior problems as a result. I found out the teacher before me struggled as well. On top of that I was given a LOT of very high maintenance IEP kids with very little, if any, support. I have been so miserable that every morning on my way to work I stop in an empty parking lot for twenty minutes and just sit there dreading the day.

    Now you would think a boxed curriculum would mean no lesson planning but turns out not. I planned for hours on end thinking of how I could modify it to fit my style. It was more stressful than if i could just start from scratch and do my own thing.

    Finally I’d had enough. I scheduled a meeting woth the principal in which I told her “I have tried to make this curriculum work, but the blood, sweat, and tears that I have to put in for that is i sustainable. It is at the point where the stress is not only affecting me but it is affecting my family (which us true) and so it’s time to give you my resignation.” She was very understanding. I told her I will finish up the semester and even work into January to ensure a smooth transition to a new teacher.

    I was scared she would be mad and that my colleagues would look down on me but everyone has been incredibly supportive. One teacher even said “Good for you! This job is not worth all the stress that comes with it.”

    The truth is I am done with education. I have done 15 years and I am proud of that work, but the industry has moved into an area that I just have no interest in. I detest the purely inquiry-based teaching model. I have no interest in being “the guide on the side.” I am sure this too shall pass, but I don’t believe direct teach will ever come back because consultants cannot make any money off it.

    So farewell educators. Thank you for your continued dedication. I wish I could have stuck it out but, for reasons I will not bore you with, I believe God is calling me out of education.
     
    wldywall and 2ndTimeAround like this.
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  3. corunnermom

    corunnermom Rookie

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    Nov 17, 2018

    You must have written my post too. I just resigned mid-year 2 weeks ago, but will continue on until winter break. I had hit rock bottom, mainly due to my recent divorce but my current teaching job did not help matters. Same curriculum issues as you and same behavior issues as you. I haven't really slept or eaten since August and one day I just decided I was done and decided to move closer to family. Teaching has really changed...it has been sucked of its fun and creativity. We are asked to do so much and the stress and anxiety outweigh any reward. It's beyond challenging. I'm investigating non profits now to help kids. Many blessings to you. Good decision. Life is too short to do something that makes you unhappy.
     
  4. akconnel

    akconnel Rookie

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    Nov 17, 2018

    Congratulations, Corunnermom, on freeing yourself. I don’t know about you but I feel an enormous weight lifted from my shoulders.

    This video: tells how staying in a bad situation can wreak havoc on our self confidence. I would encourage any teacher who is as miserable as I was to quit. There is no reason to put yourself through it.

    Somebody on these boards told me “teaching is challenging but it shouldn’t be torture.” I wholeheartedly agree.
     
  5. CDOR79

    CDOR79 Comrade

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    Nov 18, 2018

    I applaud you and your decision, Connel. I’m sure it wasn’t easy to do, but you did it! No job is worth feeling that way. You have to do what’s best for YOU.

    If I may ask, do you have another job/career lined up? I ask bc I too am considering leaving and am wondering what direction to go in- thinking maybe to do something related to education but not IN the classroom. I’m just curious of what your thoughts are and what your next step is, if you’ve thought that far ahead.
     
  6. akconnel

    akconnel Rookie

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    Nov 18, 2018

    Most likely I am going to go back to school. However I am in a unique position. I am divorced with no kids, and even though I’m forty years old I live with my mom (it’s a great arrangement that works out well for both of us). So I won’t have to go into a ton of debt, just enough for tuition and books. I don’t have to pay rent or utilities or even for groceries. I can have a part-time job for minor bills and spending money. I want to study computer information systems so I can hopefully go back and work for a school district doing their computer networking. The reason I know I’d like it is I worked as a technology facilitator for a few years and I loved the problem-solving involved in that aspect of it. And I cannot tell you how peaceful it is to show up to work, sit down at a desk with a cup of tea, and quietly start your day. No lesson planning or grading to take home and if I had a doctor appointment I could step out for a couple hours without taking the whole day off.

    Like I said I am in a unique situation. I realize not everyone can afford to go back to school full-time. But I will also say that it got to the point for me where I would rather have worked two jobs and still had a big pay cut than keep teaching.
     
  7. CDOR79

    CDOR79 Comrade

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    Nov 18, 2018

    Good for you! That’s great that you have a plan and it sounds like a good one.

    Best of luck to you with your next chapter!
     
  8. Lei286

    Lei286 Rookie

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    Nov 28, 2018

    As a second year teacher (technically...but I've worked in schools before that- just not as a classroom teacher)...I'm afraid this will be me in a few years. Whenever I first heard the number of teachers who quit teaching within 5-8 years, I was so shocked because I knew I wanted to teach and I enjoyed the kids....

    My first official year teaching was a MESS. I had two extreme behavioral kids, meetings after meetings, lack of efficient help....you name it, it probably happened to me. It was baptism by fire. I thought "It's just because I got dealt a sucky hand this year....I will be more prepared next year."

    Now this year, I have NO extreme behaviors....but I have more kids, no one but myself in the classroom, new curriculum that I am still trying to figure out, VERY DEPENDENT/SUBTLY DEFIANT CHILDREN who take much longer to catch on to routines and expectations, defensive (but involved) parents....and I'm trying to count my blessings bc some of my team members are having REALLY rough year and my problems pale in comparison...but I have absolutely no patience this year! And that was always one of my virtues that I prided myself on. Although I don't get a prep time most days and that itself causes a ton of stress and can make me seem ill-prepared.

    I feel like a drill sargent and I can't even enjoy my students. Now I'm starting to think that maybe I'm not cut out for this. Shouldn't I be more happy? Is it another sucky year where it's the number of kids and clashing personalities?It has to be me and something I'm not doing. Because while the kids do bicker, don't catch on as quickly, tattle, and chat.... I feel like I should be able to nip it without losing my cool. I'm terrified that this career choice is not the one I should have made. It depresses me.
     

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