How to Turn In and Pass Out papers

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by Unbeknownst, Aug 3, 2010.

  1. Unbeknownst

    Unbeknownst Cohort

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    Aug 3, 2010

    I'm looking primarily for a secondary perspective here.

    What's your system for having students turn in work?

    What's your system for passing out work to students?
     
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  3. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Aug 3, 2010

    From the beginning, I have the kids write their row number on the top of their papers as part of the heading.

    To collect, I say "Pass up your papers please, and start the problem on the board" Then I walk from left to right. It takes under a minute to get 32- 40 papers.

    If it's a full period test, I normally ask them to leave their papers on the first desk in their row on the way out.

    To pass them back, I organize them by row numbers and just put them on the first desk before class starts. Kids come in and find their paper on the way to their seats. It doesn't take any class time.
     
  4. Unbeknownst

    Unbeknownst Cohort

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    Sounds good.

    What about students seeing their classmates' grades? Is that an issue?

    I've thought about something similar to what you just mentioned, but the grade thing always got in my way.
     
  5. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    If I sense that a kid will be upset by his or her grade, I hold it and grab the kid on the way in. Or, if he or she suspects they didn't do well, they can stop by before homeroom and get the paper.

    But the typical reaction to a test handed back is a universal chorus of "What did you get???" from everyone involved.

    I think elementary school is different, but high school kids tend to be pretty open about this stuff.
     
  6. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

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    My students are required to place their student number next to their name. I have a 2 student helpers for each week who are responsible for collecting work and passing out worksheets. They every day collect the assignments which are due, alphabetize them, clip them, and then on a stick note write which numbers and names did not turn anything in. They then place it in the "in-box" I have for that period.

    For returned work each student has a mailbox folder and each class has a bin holding these folders. When I have a chance or when my TA does they file graded papers in the mailbox folder. At the beginning of each (when there are graded papers to return) the second student helper passes out the folders.

    I also do a lot by the computer and we use turnitin.com for everything.
     
  7. ku_alum

    ku_alum Aficionado

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    So much of what I/students do in the classroom is now digital; I don't have a lot of paper passing.

    But, for papers ... I have a tray for each class period. Papers get passed to the side and I walk along and collect the piles and put them in the tray. For paper returns, I hand them back from the pile.

    My classes never exceed 25 students, and we don't use much paper anymore.
     
  8. Maryhf

    Maryhf Connoisseur

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    Many teachers have success using a bin for students to put HW. I have a small room and don't really have the space for milling around, so I take the couple minutes to collect from each student. They need to pass the paper to the center of the row (I have a center aisle) and the center student double checks the pile for name. If HW isn't done, they pass in a "pink slip" that explains why it isn't done. I have a clipboard on my front table for each class with attendance and seating chart. Attached to the clipboard are the pink slips so I can remind a student (and I make note of the excuse of the day) and any test or quiz that needs to be made up. This way, if I don't get work corrected each night, a student's missing work doesn't go unnoticed. The system works for me but i don't know if I explained it well.
     
  9. Unbeknownst

    Unbeknownst Cohort

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    I like this.

    How do you assign student numbers? I'm thinking about having an alphabetized seating arrangement for the first six weeks and label each desk numerically.

    Each successive six weeks we would draw for new seats, and the students' number would be their new seat number. I was thinking this would help facilitate alphabetizing and passing in/out papers.

    How do you do it?

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Also~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~`

    I love the idea of two student workers. Could you walk me through how you make the decision which students help out?

    Do any students get upset with the extra work?

    And finally, do you have these student workers do their tasks during Bell Work? If so, are they excused for that week from bell work?
     
  10. midwestteacher

    midwestteacher Cohort

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    I have stacking plastic in/out boxes at the front of my room. They are labeled for each class period. This is where all work should be turned in. I am bad about laying things down and not realizing where I put them, so this works really well for me.
    I don't have rows of desks, I have eight large tables and they are in a 2 by 4 configuration. If I stand at one end, I can reach 1/2 the tables and if I stand at the other end, I can reach the other half. It is actually quicker for me to return their papers by which side of the room they are sitting on rather than walking from one end of the room to the other. That helps with confidentiality issues.
     
  11. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

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    My student numbers are 2 parts period #-alpha number in my gradebook. So the first student in my first period would be 1-1.

    For the student helpers I rotate every week in alpha order. If a student choses not to do it I skip over them. I don't do bell work, but if I did they would be excused.
     
  12. heymiss

    heymiss Comrade

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    Aug 3, 2010

    I also numbered my students in alphabetical order last year. We had SO MUCH turnover though, that it got a little ridiculous. I'd have 17b, 17c, 22b, etc. I figured it wasn't fair to the other kids to change their numbers whenever we got a new student, so I just added those kids somewhere in the middle. The whole reason for my numbering system was that it kept my papers in alphabetical order and made it easy to enter grades in my online gradebook, so if I got Andrew Anderson as a new kid, it didn't make sense to make him 27 when he should really be 1b, after Arthur Aardvark.

    I have tables instead of desks (yay!), so the row numbers wouldn't work for me, but I sure do like the idea of numbering the tables and using that to help pass out work. Passing out papers was the bane of my existence last year (tiny, overcrowded room), so I'm really trying to make it better this year.

    I also like the idea of student helpers. I don't know how it would fit into my plan for checking homework, but I do need to learn to relinquish a little control for the sake of my sanity this year. :)
     
  13. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Phenom

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    Aug 3, 2010

    I do something similar to Aliceacc.

    My students fold their papers in half, and they put their seat number on the back of the paper. (All my desks are numbered.) Their names, grades, etc. are all folded to the inside.

    Sometimes they put their papers in a turn in box (letter tray or basket), sometimes I pick them up as I'm walking around the room, sometimes they leave them on a designated desk as they leave the room, and sometimes they bring their papers to me. (Different turn-in procedures for diferent types of assignments.)

    When they get their papers back, sometimes I pass them back by row. Most of the time they just pick them up from the "pick up" box when they come in every day. Some years I have kids who enjoy passing out papers.

    I've used this with grades 6-12. It worked great with my high school kids. The 6th graders had to have more reminders.
     
  14. eddygirl

    eddygirl Companion

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    I have my desks arranged in two sections facing inwards, so no student is farther than 4 desks away from me if I am passing out papers. Students pass in assignments to the first desk in the row, then across the rows to me. I make more than one version of a test (helps prevent cheating) and they are numbered; I ask one student from each side of the room to put them in numerical order.

    All homework and tests go immediately into one of my color-coded folder (one for each class) and into my drawer. This helps prevent the old "I forgot to turn this in" from the student who didn't do the homework at home, but quickly completed the homework in class. If it's not in my hands when I collect the homework and put it in my folder, it is not accepted.

    For graded tests I am handing back, I call students up to get their tests. I don't like handing it to other students to pass back because I really hate when they look at each other's grades and compare. I explain at the beginning of the year that I don't like to hear "What did you get?" because the goal should be to do your personal best, not compare with others. Also, since I teach boys, allowing them to get out of their seats to get their tests lets them stretch their legs so they're not as "wiggly" the rest of the class period.
     
  15. KayleesMomma

    KayleesMomma New Member

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    Good Ideas! I am going into my internship, so I will observe what my mentor teacher does. I like these suggestions, especially the one about collecting the test/homework and putting it in a color coded foler right away to avoid "late" work.
     
  16. FarFromHome

    FarFromHome Connoisseur

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    I'm elementary, but my kids are great at passing in papers. Whenever we move to a new seating arrangement, we just take a few seconds to make sure they know where to pass their papers. They usually just pass all to the right, and then the last person on each row passes them up. The person in the right corner is responsible for putting them all in the document tray. It takes less than a minute.
     
  17. silverspoon65

    silverspoon65 Enthusiast

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    I have a set of drawers where students turn in paper. If something is due, I just have them pass them up and I put them in the bin for later. If they turn it in late or come to class late or whatever, they know to just put it in the bin. I am very clear that they are NEVER to put anything on my desk. I don't have any problems with lost work this way. If it isn't in the bin, you didn't turn it in. (Ha, that's catchy, I might have to make a poster that says that.)

    For passing back, I usually have kids do it, unless it is a major paper like a test or essay. Then it gets handed back by me.
     
  18. jennyd

    jennyd Companion

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    I've found that a turn in bin doesn't really work for me - I tend to forget there are papers in the bin :blush:

    Last year I started something that turned out to be great for me! I typed up little slips of paper (maybe 1/4 or 1/5 of a sheet of paper) with all the names of that class (I taught 2 different groups). I collected papers and checked off who handed it in, then clipped them all together. I knew right away who handed it in, and who had not (I had several repeat offenders), and I could note the excuses.

    If by some miracle everything was turned in, the pile went into my bag to be corrected. If I had some missing I usually gave them a day or two before I corrected.
     
  19. specialeduc8tor

    specialeduc8tor Rookie

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    Aug 15, 2010

    Something that I usually do that shows who and who didn't do their homework is tell the students to stand if they didn't do their homework. I check their names off, and then do a spot check for the rest while the students are doing the Problem of the Day. The students are usually forthcoming with whether they did homework or not.
     

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