How to show that I am serious about a job position?

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by Dare2Teach, Aug 7, 2018.

  1. Dare2Teach

    Dare2Teach Rookie

    Joined:
    May 17, 2017
    Messages:
    32
    Likes Received:
    1

    Aug 7, 2018

    Hello, everyone. This is Dare2Teach.

    I am making this thread because I need some advice.

    I have been applying for positions in my local county school system for a little over a year now. I've also applied elsewhere, even outside of the school system, but I have mainly been applying for jobs over there.

    While I have been able to make it to the interview stage for a couple of positions, I have been unsuccessful in obtaining a job.

    Whenever I apply for a job, I always like to follow up on my job application, such as sending an email to the employer, calling the employer, and a few times, even meeting the employer face-to-face. I do this because I want to show that I am serious about wanting the position.

    However, I am not sure if any employers are taking me seriously.

    For example, I applied for a Paraprofessional position at a local elementary school that I thought was a perfect fit for me since I met/exceeded all the requirements, and I both called and emailed the school to confirm that my application was received.

    While my application was received, in addition to being praised for my eagerness for the position, I ultimately did not get to the interview phase, let alone get the job.

    What's ironic is I NEVER heard back from the positions where I DID follow up after applying, and the positions where I DID get to be interviewed I DID NOT follow up with after applying.

    This is REALLY frustrating for me because I think that by following up, I am making myself stand out from the other hopefuls, and going above and beyond the application phase. I'm sure there are other hopefuls doing the same thing, but it still irks me how the position probably went to someone who just applied, and did nothing else but that.

    Is there anything else that I can do to show employers that I am serious about a job position? I feel as if I am doing everything that I can possibly do, and that employers are just not taking me seriously.

    Thank you in advance for your advice!

    - Dare2Teach
     
  2.  
  3. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2012
    Messages:
    3,131
    Likes Received:
    1,144

    Aug 7, 2018

    I don't think that you need to show them that you are serious about a position. It's not about being serious. Likely, everyone who has applied for the position is serious about it. You need to be the right fit for the position, and there's not a whole lot that you can do about that. Is it possible that you are not presenting yourself well in your face-to-face interactions or emails with potential employers?
     
    futuremathsprof likes this.
  4. Dare2Teach

    Dare2Teach Rookie

    Joined:
    May 17, 2017
    Messages:
    32
    Likes Received:
    1

    Aug 7, 2018

    If it helps, whenever I meet an employer face-to-face, I always make sure to dress for success. I am a male, so I wear a polo, nice khakis with the polo tucked in and the khakis belted at the waist, and nice dress shoes. I also make sure to bring my resume and other important documents to hand to the employer, whom I shake hands with upon meeting him/her.

    As far as sending emails go, I make sure to be professional and short and sweet with my emails.

    Here is a sample email that I would send to an employer, in this case, the Principal of a school.

    "Hello, Principal (last name). My name is (), and I am a hopeful candidate for (the position) at your school.

    I am sending you this email to make sure that you have received my application for this position.

    (If it has been a while since I applied for the position, I may also ask for updates if I have not received any updates.)

    Thank you for your time, and I look forward to hearing back from you regarding this matter.

    - (My name)"

    I'm not sure if this helps, but if you were curious, this is what I do whenever I try to follow up on a job application.

    Let me know what you think of this, and if I am handling this professionally. This goes for anybody else on this site, as well. (You don't have to, though.)

    - Dare2Teach
     
  5. ssgirl11

    ssgirl11 Companion

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2018
    Messages:
    116
    Likes Received:
    52

    Aug 8, 2018

    Honestly, you are doing all of the things that they told our cohort to do in college. That's the problem. Everyone else is taking these steps to be noticed, as well. You are doing the right things, but don't be too overeager about it. Each administrator is different; some may like your eager approach, and some may not. It's just the luck of the draw, and I'm sure your day will come!k Patience is key!
     
    bella84 and Backroads like this.
  6. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2016
    Messages:
    2,253
    Likes Received:
    1,103

    Aug 8, 2018

    Exactly! This is why I get excited about interviews, but I don't get cocky and just keep on applying even when I have them. You're impressive to get an interview, but so isn't everybody else so you just need to keep moving along until you secure a position even if you think the interview goes extremely well. It's about being the "right fit,'' and serving their needs... it could be that they are looking for a certain type of personality or maybe the candidate they select a certification or experience that they are looking for that you just don't have. I'm an advocate for getting as many certs as you can so you can say "Here are all of the things I can teach in the district.'' If you impress them enough you may get position "B" even though interviewed for position "A.'' For example, I interviewed for a 2nd grade position one time, but didn't get it... I lost out to a girl who had student taught in the school and really understood their needs and the community. However, and unexpectedly, the principal called shortly after and wanted to offer me a LTS position in the school. You need to make connections and build a good reputation. You want to be that person that they call or trade names with when positions open. Be that person that they CAN'T pass up! It's definitely hard, but you have to keep working at it. If there's a particular school you want to work in, SUB SUB SUB as much as you can! It's not working for me right now, but it's definitely solid advice that works for most people.
    An email doesn't mean much if you don't really have a reputation or stood out to the hiring committee.

    :)
     
  7. TeacherWhoRuns

    TeacherWhoRuns Companion

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2011
    Messages:
    184
    Likes Received:
    48

    Aug 8, 2018

    The US has created this culture of " Just go out and get what you want." That's a problem. In reality, it's not up to you. Someone else makes the decision to give other people jobs. I spent years as a corporate recruiter before going into teaching. No matter how good, how talented, how enthusiastic a candidate is, the decision isn't up to the candidate. There can be so many other factors at play. I've had perfect candidates declined for less experienced candidates because someone on the staff pushed for someone they knew. At the school where I did my student teaching, there was a first year teacher whose grandfather was a childhood friend of the superintendent. She maintained that if she wasn't qualified, she wouldn't have the job, but it's hard to believe of all the applicants, her application just happened to rise to the top. I worked at a district where there was an interesting number of young teachers who had parents who also taught in the district. The principal or grade level chair may want someone who they think they can micromanage, and someone with their own ideas may not be attractive. They may think the candidate will not "fit in" which, in my experience has been an excuse for age discrimination. There may be another candidate who expresses the exact same ideas the grade level team and principal want to see in the classroom. This is something you'd go in without any idea of, it's just a chance meeting of the minds. There are so may scenarios, I can't even begin to list them.
    I know how heartbreaking it is. I applied at 27 districts this summer and was called to interview in four. One of which wasn't even for a teaching position, it was to manage the afterschool program.
    All you can do is not give up hope. Keep trying. Learn from each interview. It's frustrating, it's worrisome, it's heartbreaking, it can even be demeaning. I agree with the above poster that much of it is the luck of the draw, which is counterintuitive, but it plays a huge part. It's not always you. You don't ever know who you're up against.
     
    Backroads, Leaborb192 and RSA1984 like this.
  8. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2016
    Messages:
    2,253
    Likes Received:
    1,103

    Aug 8, 2018

    So the real advice would be: get as much experience and exposure as you can and MAKE connections. In the end, that's what will you get you a job anyway. Or, get a SPED certification and you'll, for the most part, be handed a job... if not significantly boosted up there.
    :D
     
  9. Bunnie

    Bunnie Devotee

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2009
    Messages:
    1,137
    Likes Received:
    165

    Aug 8, 2018

    I'm not sure if I'm reading this right but if you try and follow-up after submitting an application through multiple avenues for one job it may turn off whoever you're contacting or who is looking at resumes/applications. There are plenty of job postings I've seen in my area that say specifically only apply via the application or email posted.

    Also just as food for thought, every job I've gotten I've never followed up after applying nor was I able to send a thank you email after the interview/demo. I've also never followed up (other than a thank you email) after having an interview unless I was contacted.

    Posters above have said pretty much what I would have said. It's not you, it's the market and other applicants. There's no such thing as not taking someone seriously when applying for a job unless their resume and cover letter do not fit the job description. I would advise having a professional or maybe admin/someone on a hiring committee take a look at your resume and cover letter and give you feedback on how to improve it. You might think your resume and cover letter is great but getting some feedback on it about how to make it stand out could be helpful.
     
    Leaborb192 likes this.
  10. Backroads

    Backroads Fanatic

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2010
    Messages:
    2,964
    Likes Received:
    1,350

    Aug 8, 2018

    Not going to lie--if I were in charge of hiring and someone I knew and liked came through and they were sufficiently qualified, I just might throw them a bone and hire them even if they weren't necessarily the best. It's human nature and there's something to be said about going with what you know.
     
    vickilyn and bella84 like this.
  11. Dare2Teach

    Dare2Teach Rookie

    Joined:
    May 17, 2017
    Messages:
    32
    Likes Received:
    1

    Aug 8, 2018

    I just want to give a big thank you to those of you who have replied. It's good to know that I seem to be doing all that I can do, as far as following up on an application goes.

    A week ago, I applied for both a Paraprofessional and an After School Program Worker position, both at an elementary school (and the same elementary school, at that).

    I DID email the Principal of the school the other day to confirm my application, and she told me that she will look at all the applications, and select who to move forward.

    Well, wouldn't you know it? I received a phone call from the Principal of the school, today, and I have an interview set up for the After School Program Worker position, tomorrow.

    This is the first time where following up has worked in terms of me getting an interview, or so I think.

    I wasn't told anything about the Paraprofessional, position, though, so I'm not sure if I'm still in the running for that position or not. I'll ask her about that position when I'm at the interview, but more than likely, the position has already been filled. (I'm sure it won't hurt to ask, right?)

    Once again, thank you to everyone who has responded. I REALLY appreciate it.

    - Dare2Teach
     
  12. vickilyn

    vickilyn Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2014
    Messages:
    7,633
    Likes Received:
    1,847

    Aug 9, 2018

    You are assuming that following up resulted in an interview, but I suspect that you have qualifications that make you a potential fit in that position. I would caution against giving credit where it may very well not be due. We hear the term "right or good fit" a lot in education, and that may be the real cause for the interview. I suggest asking the secretary who handles the applications about the para position - I wouldn't muddy the water interviewing for this job. But that is just my opinion.
     
    bella84 likes this.

Share This Page

Members Online Now

Total: 294 (members: 0, guests: 231, robots: 63)
test