How to "overcome" a resume

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by teacherperson123, Jul 8, 2018.

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  1. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Jul 9, 2018

    I'm actually pretty familiar with languages and the issue of fluency. You don't have to be a native speaker in order to pass the CSET. If you're not interested in teaching it, that's fine, but maybe don't highlight that bit of experience. We've had long-term subs in our foreign language classes who didn't speak a word of whatever language they were supposed to be teaching; they were just warm bodies. They could definitely put on their resumes that they "taught" Spanish or French or whatever, but it would mean squat if they couldn't also back it up with passing a proficiency exam in the language. I don't know if that's what's going on in your case or what, but it could be what the reviewers are thinking when they look at your resume.

    Also, you should think about cooling it with the weird "investigator" stuff. Those sorts of comments are odd and unnecessary, especially given that PPs were offering you legit advice in direct response to questions that you asked.

    Since you said that your resume includes your reasons for leaving, I'm wondering if your resume looks or seems unusual and strange to reviewers. Can you edit out the personal stuff and post it here so that we can see what it looks like and offer feedback?
     
  2. teacherperson123

    teacherperson123 Rookie

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    I'm not interested in being a credentialed Chinese teacher. I was not a long term sub, I was THE teacher. I wasn't a warm body nor do I barely speak the language. I still tutor students from age 10 through 18 as high as level 4. I've never actually tried the full CSET in Chinese but the practice tests were a little beyond my skill. That was a couple years ago. Again, it was never my intention to get a Chinese credential. Would I omit it on a resume? No way! My letters of recommendation from the school say I was the schools Chinese teacher for two years when I rescued the program when they couldn't find anyone. It's part of my career. You're talking like I was some shlub they tossed in the room, to an extent. I put that I taught Mandarin because I TAUGHT it, not "taught" it. I studied levels 1-5 and have worked with aprivaye tutor for a year afterwards and continue to tutor the languahe today. My Chinese professor will vouch for me, and has, that I am "fluent". Am I native fluent? No, there's over 30000 characters and you're considered "fluent" as a non native when you hit like 8-10000. When a Taiwanese professor who has taught the language for 20 years says I'm "fluent" and I taught levels 1,2,and 3 for work years that is legit in my book. Either way, I never wanted to get the full credential. Just the fact I was hired to do it and learned the language to the level I have as a white guy from the south in such a short period is enough for me. If someone else wants me to teach a few periods, fine. It's easy at this point but not something I want so much.
     
    Last edited: Jul 9, 2018
  3. teacherperson123

    teacherperson123 Rookie

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    I don't think my resume looks strange to reviewers and I've had other people view it. I would not be getting the interviews that i DO get if it "looked strange". I've had colleagues and admin review it and the main suggestion I've received is similar to "been there" suggestion to have different versions depending on where I apply bc my prior experience i going to scare off schools. I have about 2 dozen letters of rec and stellar references. I just finished teaching at the oldest high school in the US west of the Mississippi and the flagship public school for the entire state, a 3000+ student magnet school with the very brightest students from San Francisco. Fact of the matter is, I was told that is going to make it more difficult to get interviews because it is such an outlier in terms of acheivement Two other people in this thread knew exactly what school I was referring to without me naming it and both agreed that teaching there would scare off other schools, even those in the same district.
    That, and the way it might be perceived that I taught at 3 schools in 5 years and 1/2 the time I was teaching Chinese (which should be seen as really impressive, IMO, but I can also see it the other way where schools see it as a negative bc it means less Social Science) when my credential is Social Science. I am going to begin really paying attention to putting together a more streamlined resume for less hig achieving or affluent schools in order to have a better shot and not play up coaching Model UN and Speech/Debate or teaching AP courses in Social Science.
     
    Last edited: Jul 9, 2018
  4. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Enthusiast

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    Jul 10, 2018

    Agreed. I feel like every time one of you experienced educators/administrators say something to OP, it’s tantamount to these two emojis: :banghead::beatdeadhorse:
     
  5. teacherperson123

    teacherperson123 Rookie

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    Jul 10, 2018

     
  6. teacherperson123

    teacherperson123 Rookie

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    They are completely fixating on the fact I was a Chinese teacher, questioning my credentials, whether I really "taught" the class, making assumptions, etc. I never had a waiver, I was not a sub, etc etc. I respect the advice, I don't appreciate two strangers trying to inhsinuate I was some shlub who is trying to claim he was a Chinese teacher, who quite frankly when looking at their prior postings have a "know it all" attitude and try to microananlyze every poster, then act all superior if they disagree. The people in this thread who are very familiar with where I've taught provided feedback very similar to my dept chair, admin, and colleagues who actually know me. I take the opinions and advice of those people a little more since they are familiar with the area, the schools, and how teaching where I have will affect job searching.
     
  7. Been There

    Been There Habitué

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    Jul 10, 2018

    As you have noticed, people here can be quite opinionated and judgemental. If a poster describes an unusual situation that others cannot relate to or contrasts with what they are familiar with in their school/classroom, then anyone with an opinion is likely to come out of the woodwork. There are those who will offer irrelevant advice with hardly any information (e.g. age of students) and others who can't wait to launch into a condescending barrage of questions and highly-critical comments that are enough to make one regret ever having posted to begin with.

    Yours is the perfect example of a newcomer to the forum (your first post) receiving a less-than-warm welcome simply because you don't fit their stereotype of a teacher. Read through the threads and you may notice a distinct pattern - OPs that can't think for themselves at all - even to overcome the most minor bumps - and are the least "fit" to be teachers seem to receive the most sympathy and support. Instead of putting themselves in your shoes before responding, they seem to be hell-bent on putting you on the stand. This is the blind discrimination that I've observed among educators throughout much of my career and that your former department chair and others have warned you about. I noticed no one has offered to give you a virtual hug yet. (Sorry, I'm not the hugging type!)
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2018
  8. phillyteacher

    phillyteacher Comrade

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    Jul 10, 2018

    Since when are clarifying questions critical and condescending? The OP asked for advice but seems to only be hearing it as supportive when it confirms existing opinions, not when it digs into other very common potential issues that come up in hiring that are being offered as things to consider...
     
    bella84 and YoungTeacherGuy like this.
  9. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Enthusiast

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    Jul 10, 2018

    I apologize if I upset you with the emojis, but I think you are misunderstanding what the other posters are saying. In many states, a teacher is considered highly qualified ONLY if they meet certain criteria, such as passing all of the CSET’s in their subject area, etc. And since you have not yet met that requirement — I’m not saying you can’t or won’t — you are neither considered to be qualified or certified despite your prior teaching experience. You may be allowed to teach with an emergency credential, but that’s it, I believe. In the eyes of the state and public school districts, you are NOT qualified until you are officially certified.

    Does that make sense? That’s all Caeser753 and YoungTeacherGuy we’re trying to say. Been There also offered excellent words of advice and probably has more experience working in education that anyone in these forums.
     
  10. teacherperson123

    teacherperson123 Rookie

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    Of course I already know all of that. I know that I am not "highly qualified" as a Chinese teacher. I'm a Social Science teacher with a lifetime credential and NB certification. BUT, I'm also the teacher of record for TWO years. However the school I worked for managed to do it, they had me teaching 3 periods of Mandarin level 1, 2, and 3 and I was the teacher of record. All of my letters of rec from the school refer to me as being a member of both the world language and social science department, that I was the school's Chinese teacher AND a Social Science teacher, I took the kids on a trip to China, etc. I never once claimed to be credentialed in the subject. Schools can have me teach Chinese if they want. I know for a fact the school I taught Chinese at never even bothered to get a emergency waiver or anything. Y'all are acting like I can somehow omit this on my resume, or just not mention it like it was a long-term sub assignment. I taught more periods of Chinese than I did Social Science, despite the fact my credential is SS. It is what it is. I honestly though when I was doing it that it would look amazing on my resume, and to be honest, it seems like it had an almost detrimental effect in the long term. Although...the job I just left I was told part of the reason they hired me was because I know Mandarin (80% of the students spoke it), so who knows?

    I can imagine as confusing as it seems to posters here (believe me, I can understand) is potentially as confusing as it may be to admin and people reviewing apps. There's nothing I can do. I can't go back and suddenly not teach Chinese for two years. It was my job.
     
  11. teacherperson123

    teacherperson123 Rookie

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    When a poster uses phrases like "why you couldn't/didn't hack it" and utilizes more of a tone that seems intended to "out" people or paint a situation negatively, it comes across as condescending to many people. I got LIFO'd at my last job, couldn't be offered tenure at the one before bc I wasn't licensed to teach Chinese and SS courses were being cut (i was on prob 2 and literally found out one week into the year that 12 sections of Social Scince would be cut at the end of the year and was like "oh crap, there goes me staying on as a social science teacher"), and my first job was in a rural area for one year and i never intended on staying there. I'm not sure where these people teach, but this stuff is common as hell in my experience.
     
  12. Been There

    Been There Habitué

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    Jul 10, 2018

    One person had it right in a recent thread. As adults, we know that "good" advice is best given in a friendly manner for it to be well-received. How we present our opinions is critical to be effectively communicated.
     
  13. mathteachertobe

    mathteachertobe Cohort

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    Jul 10, 2018

    I saw some positions listed on the SFUSD vacancy list that might be a fit for you. Most of the high school SS positions are 1 year only, but I think SOTA had a permanent position. Would you consider teaching middle school?

    Also, LIFO isn't really how our contract works. Were you on a temporary contract? If not, when were you notified you wouldn't be returning?
     
  14. teacherperson123

    teacherperson123 Rookie

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    I saw those, they just popped up past couple days. I applied to SOTA, IBW, and another one. Yeah, it was temporary. The contracts in SFUSD were different than where I've been before, that's for sure! LIFO was just the way it was put to me. There was consolidation and those people then requested transfers. SFUSD was the first large district I've worked for, and I just kind of took it in stride. I was kind of like "so does that mean I still get first crack when other positions open at other schools if they do later on?" and they said thats not how sfusd works. It was like you just go back to the applicant pile and aren't considered to have seniority in the district over new applicants, so you could easily get lost in the shuffle of applicants even though you already work there. My prior districts had no more than 3 high schools, so a big ass district like SFUSD is still new to me, for sure.
     
  15. phillyteacher

    phillyteacher Comrade

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    Jul 10, 2018

    Ok but there's also something to not reading tone into writing unnecessarily. I believe in reading others comments from the position that they are on the same page and posting in the interest of helping, and with that frame of mind nothing in this thread really came off as condescending or problematic. There's some onus on the reader to also ensure they aren't being overly defensive or reading something that isn't really there...
     
  16. mathteachertobe

    mathteachertobe Cohort

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    Jul 10, 2018

    Would you consider middle school? There is an opening at Vis Valley Middle for a SS teacher fluent in Spanish, no credential mentioned. The job includes teaching a Newcomer class. If you can talk about your Central Valley experience in your cover letter, you could be a compelling candidate. You need to decide, though, if middle school is something you can embrace, and also whether a low SES school is the right direction for you. That opening was posted yesterday.

    Seven years ago, I had a temporary 1 year position at Wash. Enrollment declined a bit, and they didn't need the position the next year. After scrambling I ended up at a middle school, which was not at all what I envisioned when I made this career change. It turns out I love this age group, so for me, the story ended up a very happy one. But that summer after my Wash job ended, I was pretty miserable. Just my long-winded way of saying hang in there and good luck.
     
  17. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    I'm really not sure why you're having such a hard time with what I've said. You are asking "how to overcome a resume" and I, along with others, have given some input as to what resume reviewers may be thinking when they look at your resume. I'm not calling you out or anything, even though you're defending yourself as though I am. The thing is, though, that I'm not the one accepting applications, so I don't need your defense. You're directing it at the wrong person.

    Quite frankly, all the talk about Chinese is a little weird. It seems like you're pinning all your struggles on the fact that you taught it, although I don't understand why it's such a big deal. People teach Chinese. It's a thing. I've never heard of anyone being denied an offer for a teaching position because they taught Chinese in the past. Your focus and fixation on Chinese is odd and off-putting to me, and I wonder if the people interviewing you are getting the same vibe.

    Do you have any real work experience outside the field of education? You say that you have a PhD, a lifetime certification, and National Board certification, even though you've only been teaching for around four years or so. That's intense. Is it possible that the people reviewing your resume and interviewing you might worry that you are too focused on teaching, that you may not have an appropriate work-life balance?
     
  18. RaiderFan87

    RaiderFan87 Rookie

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    Jul 10, 2018

    The OP has an axe to grind for some reason. No amount of sage advice will help him out, unfortunately.
     
  19. Been There

    Been There Habitué

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    Jul 11, 2018

    As that silly emoji implied, I don't think anything more needs to be said on this matter. :heavycheck:
     
    SpecialPreskoo likes this.
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