how to draw people/animals

Discussion in 'Kindergarten' started by lpbytp, Sep 11, 2011.

  1. lpbytp

    lpbytp Rookie

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    Sep 11, 2011

    Lots of times in Kindergarten classes, we ask our students to draw themselves or someone else. I have this one student who just won't draw people or animals! He says he doesn't know how, and no matter how much encouragement I offer, he just seems not to want to try. It is obvious that he has just never been taught to draw people or animals, but I'm not sure how to go about teaching it! I am DEFINITELY not an artist, myself. Any advice would be appreciated! Thanks:D
     
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  3. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Sep 11, 2011

    I wouldn't teach him how to do it...I'd give him real pictures of animals to look at and a variety of art supplies to explore with.
     
  4. FunTwoTeach

    FunTwoTeach Rookie

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    Sep 11, 2011

    Could he trace some or use stencils, until he gets the confidence to do it freehand?
     
  5. pjones858

    pjones858 Rookie

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    Sep 11, 2011

    I wonder if he would be more willing to try with fingerpaint. That might be a more natural way to ease him into it.

    If you don't have any fingerpaints, you can use shaving cream right on the desk or table. When you spread it out and rub it, it disappears so he might feel better when he realizes it will go away.
     
  6. mrsammieb

    mrsammieb Habitué

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    Sep 11, 2011

    I teach them by using shapes. For example, the head is a circle. The body is a rectangle. The legs and arms are rectangles. Then the eyes are circles the mouth is a half circle etc.

    Does that help?
     
  7. Tasha

    Tasha Phenom

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    Sep 11, 2011

    I agree with the shapes idea. Writing workshop has a lesson on drawing where you emphasize that all drawings are from shapes and lines. You can show them how to draw a house with a square and triangle roof and rectangle windows/doors and people as mentioned above.
     
  8. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    I like the shapes idea, but I hesitate to teach kids a specific way to draw anything...I remember when teaching kindergarten kids would draw adorable pictures of happy round birds...only to be replaced later by 'V' birds...I think sometimes their creativity gets replaced with thoughts of the 'right way' to draw things...
     
  9. pjones858

    pjones858 Rookie

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    I agree with you completely, czacza!
     
  10. lpbytp

    lpbytp Rookie

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    Sep 13, 2011

    he did great!

    Thanks everyone! Here's what I ended up doing - I showed my own example as a model, but also said that we're all unique and so everyone's picture will be unique, etc. I suggested starting with a circle for the head. I also emphasized that not everyone is an artist, including myself! -- And that's OK. Provided lots of encouragement as they worked, and it turned out that the boy who was so concerned about "not being able to draw people" did a truly fantastic job!!

    Some great ideas here for the future, so thanks again! I love the idea of finger paint - it's almost "expected" that the picture would be a little messy and thus, imperfect. I am a new teacher though, and need to ease my way into the fingerpaints! I can imagine that fingerpaint-day could be one chaotic day. :lol:
     
  11. zoey'smom

    zoey'smom Cohort

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    Sep 13, 2011

    We do Handwriting with out tears and in that program they introduce mat man. Mat man is usded to teach body parts and how to draw a person, but also how to make lines and shapes they will need for writing. After introducing Mat Man I am amazed by their pictures and they love drawing after that. They also have a song to go with it and books. Here is a web site with more information.

    http://www.hwtears.com/hwt/learning-lounge/mat-man-world/build-mat-man/classroom
     
  12. teach'ntx

    teach'ntx Comrade

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    Sep 13, 2011

    I find this topic very timely as my daughter was in tears last night trying to do her homework. She had no problem filling in the blanks to what is lous and what is quiet. She could spell dog on her own and could copy my writing of library.

    However, she was suppose to draw the pictures and did not feel she could draw them correctly. I suggested she draw open books for the library but she said no. She wrote the word library so she needed to draw a library. I finally used the shapes to get her to draw it, but I am now dreading all drawing homework!!! I will gladly take ideas from K teachers. (I have told her that I do not grade on the drawing, just if they did it. She did not like that answer).
     
  13. 123456now

    123456now Rookie

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    Sep 14, 2011

    Drawing With Children

    This is a great book:

    Drawing with Children

    One of the points that I really like is the author questioning why art is the one thing we expect kids to just get. Everything else is taught in small parts and built until they understand. We don't sit a kid down at the piano with a lot of music and say, "Play!" We don't hand a kid pencils and paper and say, "Write!" We teach them how to do those things.

    She addresses the same concerns brought up here about stifling creativity and explains that that is not the case. They still have the freedom to be creative but also the base knowledge from which to start.

    Here's the website. Check out the student gallery and the ages of the children. These are not gifted children. They are regular children who were just instructed on how to draw.
     

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