how to do Jeopardy in the classroom?

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by funnyface07, Mar 1, 2012.

  1. funnyface07

    funnyface07 Rookie

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    Mar 1, 2012

    I wanted to know if I could get some advice/pointers on how to do a Jeopardy review game in the classroom? I have the powerpoint template and I will be using a projector. My question is... how do you split up the kids? Groups? How do they "buzz" in? How do you keep track of their scores/money earned? I remember doing this when I was a student teacher and it went pretty badly, mostly because I didn't hash out these kinds of details and it was just unorganized. Now I'm older and wiser and want to try again :)

    This is for a high school (somewhat remedial) math class. The past two months have been spent preparing them for a state test... practice test, after practice test, after practice test. I can tell they are burnt out and wanted to do something fun the day before they take it (some kids even asked me when I first took over for the teacher who left: "can we please play Jeopardy?")

    Also, any other kinds of fun math-based activities would be appreciated. Sometimes its like pulling teeth just to get them to do anything in that class.
     
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  3. KateL

    KateL Habitué

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    Mar 1, 2012

    I do Jeopardy review games sometimes. I used to use a PowerPoint template that I found online, but now I set up the game here: http://jeopardylabs.com/ because it allows me to keep track of the score.

    My students already sit at tables of 4. So I make each table a team, and I give each team a mini whiteboard and a dry erase marker. I randomly select a student (using popsicle sticks) to choose the category and point amount. We look at the "answer", and each team then has to write the "question" on their whiteboard. After 15-30 seconds, I ask them to hold the whiteboards up in the air. Every team with the correct answer gets the points. Every team with an incorrect answer loses points.

    I like doing it this way because it makes everyone in the room think about every answer, not just the people who are quick on the buzzer. I also like having them work in groups for this, because the ones who know the answers end up explaining them to the people at their table who are still confused.

    Have fun!
     
  4. ~mrs.m~

    ~mrs.m~ Comrade

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    Mar 1, 2012

    Kate, your ideas on this are great. Thanks for sharing.

    That website is so cool!
     
  5. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Virtuoso

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    Mar 1, 2012

    We just tried this in my virtual classroom for the first time today. It works so well in that setting! My live session platform even gives me the order of who "raises a hand" first. My teaching team is going to do this a lot more often, including putting our one male teacher in a tie so he can be Alex Trebek via webcam.
     
  6. Sam Aye M

    Sam Aye M Companion

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    Mar 1, 2012

    When I used jeopardy in the classroom, I divided the class into two teams, and each student had a turn in order of where they sat. The team that was "up" got to try to answer the question. If that student did not answer correctly, or takes too long to answer, the student whose turn it was on the other team got the chance to steal the question. If he answers correctly, his team gets the points. If he answers incorrectly, no one gets the points. Either way, the student who is trying to "steal" the question still gets his own turn after he tried to answer the other team's question. We would just keep going back and forth and almost every time, it would come down to the last question or two.

    Since the idea was to actually use it as a study aide, I was pretty relaxed about the team helping each other since what I really wanted was the whole class to hear and relearn the correct answer. Students that needed help could get help. Students that I didn't think needed help weren't allowed to get help from their team. It was very subjective, and it doesn't take long for the students to know what I am trying to do, and also join in and try to help each other out.

    I should note, however, that I did this as a history teacher. That may, or may not, make a difference.
     
  7. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Mar 2, 2012

    KateL--I love the way you organize your Jeopardy games. I love doing review games, like Jeopardy, with my class, but with a few very loud, very competitive students, it never ends up being fun for everyone. I'm definitely going to give this a try.
     
  8. KateL

    KateL Habitué

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    Mar 2, 2012

    Glad I can help. :) The competitive students are actually very quiet during my version of the game, because they don't want the other teams to steal their answers to write on the whiteboards. It's a win for everyone!
     
  9. funnyface07

    funnyface07 Rookie

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    Mar 2, 2012

    Thanks for the tips, very helpful!
     
  10. Rockguykev

    Rockguykev Connoisseur

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    Mar 5, 2012

    I have my kids in groups of 6. Every group answers every question by writing down their answer. When all 6 papers are up in the air I know the whole group has it. I pick one student from the group to bring their answer up to me (which saves me from walking around for 6 straight periods...) and if it is right they get double points. The other groups can all still get points if they got it right so it keeps everyone involved.

    It took me quite awhile to get it set up this way because I wanted to balance the fun of the race with the desire to have everyone involved. This way works out great on both accounts.
     
  11. Jeky

    Jeky Comrade

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    Mar 5, 2012

    My method is similar to those above. Here are my rules:
    - Students are in groups of 3-4. When the question comes up, each individual must first work out their answer on their own paper. Then, they check their answers with their group. They need to have mathematical conversation to ensure that everyone agrees on the answer. They also need to make sure that each person can explain how they got the answer.
    - Once the group agrees on an answer, the captain writes the work and the answer on the group whiteboard. When I ring the bell, all whiteboards go in the air. Each team that gets it correct gets the points. For the team that chose the question, I get to pick a random student from that group to stand up and explain the answer. If they can, their group gets double points.
    - Here is my new twist this year: Instead of me keeping track of points, I designate a scorekeeper for each team, who is in charge of keeping track of points on an extra sheet of paper. In all honestly, I have them turn in the paper but I never even add up the scores, and they never ask about it!
    - In terms of helping them work together in groups, I DO offer a "treat" for the team that I observe working together the best throughout the game (a dum-dum sucker).
    Super fun!
     
  12. MsMar

    MsMar Fanatic

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    Mar 6, 2012

    When I taught high school I did it the same way Kate described and it worked really well. I used it for review games before tests and the students really liked it.
     

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