How much responsibility is too much... special circumstances

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by SarahValdez, Feb 12, 2018.

  1. SarahValdez

    SarahValdez New Member

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    Feb 12, 2018

    I have been a SPED IA for 4 years and I will be intern eligible to be a SPED teacher this coming school year. I have hit a bit of a roadblock though. The teacher I work with is gone on leave for a few months and did not leave any lesson plans. No sub has taken this class, so it is just angry teachers coming off their prep bringing many papers to grade (not that I blame them for being angry). Because of this the majority of classroom management and lesson planning has fell on to me. Although I feel capable of doing it, not sure I should since this is not my job description. Here is where it gets tricky: I just got offered this classroom for next school year. Because of this I feel like I'm being watched as to how I handle the students. District office has stopped by to make sure I am doing okay, knows I am the one modeling lesson plans after the teacher,s old outline and has told me to keep going. Principal is indifferent as to what is happening as long as classroom is not wild. What do I do?! I know that they want to see how I will handle myself as a teacher, but am I getting myself into a sticky situation by doing this? I know this is an imperfect situation where no one is really doing the right thing. So what do I do? Help!!
     
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  3. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Feb 12, 2018

    If I were in your shoes, I'd assume the role of the classroom teacher for now even though it's not in your job description. Normally I wouldn't make this suggestion, but you're in a unique position in that you've already been offered this job for next year.
     
  4. Been There

    Been There Habitué

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    Feb 13, 2018

    This would be the perfect time to make full use of educational technology. For me, that would be easy because I've prepared most of my multimedia lessons on my laptop so that they're easily accessible and can be used 1:1, in small groups or with the whole class. Missed lessons can also be made available to those who may have been absent. Done properly, you can "wow" anyone who stops by to check things out. Best of all, it has the incredible power of engagement! I'd be glad to send you a sample.
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2018
  5. SarahValdez

    SarahValdez New Member

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    Feb 14, 2018

    I would really appreciate that :)
     
  6. Been There

    Been There Habitué

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    Feb 14, 2018

    I agree with Caesar753 - just act like you're the teacher already. What special ed. program are we talking about and what are the ages of your students? As a former special ed. teacher, I would like to offer my support in the way of resources, lessons and specific instructional strategies from my "archives". Over the course of many years, I perfected my techniques and multimedia lessons that were tailored for students with a wide range of learning disabilities. If you are interested, email communication would facilitate sending you whatever is needed to help you get started on the right foot. Hope to hear from you - my email address is: intellintervention@gmail.com
     

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