How is the budget for education in your state or district doing?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Geologygirl, May 2, 2017.

  1. Geologygirl

    Geologygirl Comrade

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    May 2, 2017

    Despite Cali passing added funding for schools last election our district budget got cut almost in half. Anyone else in the same situation? How do your districts handel it?
     
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  3. whizkid

    whizkid Rookie

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    May 2, 2017

    Budget keeps getting gutted here.
     
  4. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Aficionado

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    May 2, 2017

    My CA district is doing pretty well. We've hired more TOSAs each year and have gone 1:1 (Chromebooks) in all K-8 classrooms (we used to be 1:1 in grades 2-8 only).
     
  5. TeachDW

    TeachDW Rookie

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    May 2, 2017

    I can say that the budget is still not enough that's why they are not yet hiring for more teachers despite the increasing number of students.
     
  6. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Phenom

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    May 2, 2017

    School funding is not going well in Texas. I keep tabs on four nearby districts and they all are going to lose millions this coming year. The two I've worked in most recently have been making cuts for several years, and I suspect the other two have as well.
     
  7. kellzy

    kellzy Companion

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    May 2, 2017

    School funding is going great in Utah. A recent change to the Utah Constitution was helpful in securing funding. There's a massive teacher shortage here right now, low wages plus constant media attacks on teachers have discouraged people from going into the profession. As a result, in order to get the people who are graduating, most urban districts in Utah are giving massive pay raises for the teachers next year. My district, for example, is giving an 11.67% pay increase across all steps and lanes. So, yeah, things are looking pretty good here in Utah.
     
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  8. TeachDW

    TeachDW Rookie

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    May 3, 2017


    That's good then. The pay increase can really attract more teachers to apply for the job. This is the problem with some districts. Pay increase is seldom given. No wonder more teachers are transffering from one school to another, hoping that they will receive better compensation.
     
  9. AmyMyNamey

    AmyMyNamey Comrade

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    May 4, 2017

    In Indiana, only teachers in wealthy white districts see pay increases.
     
    Last edited: May 4, 2017
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  10. mrsf70

    mrsf70 Rookie

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    May 6, 2017

    I, too, am in Indiana, and the financial future is bleak. Our school lost Title I funding, so we are cutting 3 gen ed teachers and one sped teacher. My former district also has several schools losing Title I funding and are cutting as many as 8 teachers and assistants. No new state money heading our way in the budget, but we have tons of money for vouchers for families with incomes as high as $80,000 to send their children to private school.
     
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  11. benj009

    benj009 New Member

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    May 6, 2017

    Hmm...

    NJ school districts have been in trouble ever since Chris Christie. It's his last year as governor and many districts are upbeat that he's leaving. But, with Betsy Devos and Trump in the white house it's going to get really bad real soon. Hate to be the pestimist.

    Expect to see huge cuts in education, and many more charter schools in your area. Heck, public education might be an afterthought when Trump/Betsy Devos get done.
     
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  12. SageScience

    SageScience Companion

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    May 6, 2017

    I am not a Trump supporter but I just want to point out that Betsy DeVos and Donald Trump have nothing to do with how local school budgets or state budgets are voted on or how local and state laws are passed.
     
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  13. AmyMyNamey

    AmyMyNamey Comrade

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    May 6, 2017

    The war on education begins not with these two puppets, but with the corporations financing them and others.
     
  14. whizkid

    whizkid Rookie

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    May 9, 2017

    How did that happen if I may ask?
     
  15. FourSquare

    FourSquare Fanatic

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    May 9, 2017

    We expected money from the state that didn't materialize, so rumor has it they used emergency funds to get us through the year and now we won't be able to start on time in the fall. In short, it's a mess and always is. I do a little dance every time my paycheck actually deposits on time. :eek:
     
  16. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    May 9, 2017

    School funding is absolutely abysmal in my state. We have this horrible little thing called TABOR that will basically prevent schools from ever being funded. I think the future is extremely bleak here. COL, especially in my city, has risen exponentially over the past several years and continues to rise at a very rapid pace, yet teachers are actually being pad LESS than they were several years ago. I pay about $400 more in rent now than I did when I moved here four years ago, and I lived in a nicer apartment back then. I'm actually fortunate because my rent hasn't gone up as much as others has because I've been in the same apartment for several years...new residents are paying $300-400 more than me (and I'm WAY out in the suburbs, BTW). I'm on year 7 of teaching, but I'm paid as 3rd year teacher due to salary freezes, and I don't even get all of that due to furlough days. On a personal level, I love my city and I love living here, but I do see it coming to a point where I'm simply "priced out." I'm single, so I have no other income to rely on. We're already seeing a teacher shortage developing and I see it getting to the point where the only people who can/will teach are those that have wealthy spouses. The TABOR supporters of course see this as "not their problem" and say that if teachers aren't happy with the salary they're welcome to go into another field or just get a part time job because "teaching is basically part time anyway." Part of me is morbidly curious to see at what point (if any) the general public will accept this as a "real" problem that impacts society as a whole rather than just individual teachers.
     
  17. mrsf70

    mrsf70 Rookie

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    May 10, 2017

    Our student numbers dropped for next year, so funding also changed. The change was minimal, roughly 20 students, but budgets are tight. The neighboring district is the first/second largest (depending on the year) in the state, and they, too, have had major shifts in Title I funding for next year.Their changes, however, seem to be a result of direct budget formula changes at the state level. Several middle schools with 600+ students are cutting as many as 5 teachers and several assistant positions per school. Scary stuff!
     
  18. Pi-R-Squared

    Pi-R-Squared Devotee

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    May 10, 2017

    The funding is there. However, enrollment is declining all across the county. Thus, we'll lose money based on head count. We've lost an number of aides and the janitorial staff for this school wasn't replaced.
     
  19. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    May 10, 2017

    There was a shift for us. We get kids who are expelled from the district, but last year the local school districts wanted a piece of that pie, so they opened up their own program. They held onto kids who would otherwise be expelled, and had a separate classroom and even opened up a new school.

    Our enrollment got reduced, but it didn't really work out that bad. I think those schools realized they didn't really want to deal with those kids, or weren't equipped t do so. We did have to merge 2 schools and only one staff member (non-credentialed teacher) lost her job half way through the year.
    I haven't heard of any other reductions, so I think we're good.
     
  20. Go Blue!

    Go Blue! Connoisseur

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    May 10, 2017

    Baltimore City PS is currently facing a $135 million deficit that has been years in the making. After the state and city refused to help last fall/winter; my district's CEO threatened to lay off 1,000 school-based staff members to close the budget gap. In March, Baltimore's new Mayor promised to give us half of the amount ($65 million). Our Governor - who called teachers "union thugs" - stated he did not want to put any more money into Balt. City Schools because it is a "disaster." Despite this, due to immense pressure, he has released more funds for our district but not enough to close the budget gap.

    Our contract expired over a year ago and the Union & the District are at a standstill due to the district claiming they cannot sustain/continue to pay current teachers' salary rates and that they need teachers to pay more in healthcare costs - these are the key reason, they claim, that the district is $135 million short.

    Everyone is on edge wondering how this will affect their job next year; schools will be losing staff members so everyone will be expected to do more with less.
     
  21. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Groupie

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    May 11, 2017

    See that's what I fear for in the years to come as the DOE gets targeted. I feel that they will shrink it -then shut it down -- which will result in all funding coming from the state. Things will be much worse before they get better!
    :mad:
     

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