How does a Middle School Student Fail?

Discussion in 'Middle School / Junior High' started by Blue, Jan 12, 2012.

  1. Blue

    Blue Aficionado

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    Jan 12, 2012

    My wonderful GS is in 6th grade. He either gets A's or F's. The grades are not a reflection of his knowledge, but his ambition.

    Should he take 6th grade over?
     
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  3. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Jan 12, 2012

    Blue, is this a work completion issue? How do his test scores look?
     
  4. Sarge

    Sarge Enthusiast

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    Jan 12, 2012

    In my opinion, high school is where ambition comes into play. If a student in middle school has the prerequisite skills to compete academically at the next grade level, he or she should move on.
     
  5. Sarge

    Sarge Enthusiast

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    In other words, no he should not take sixth grade over and his parents should fight like he11 to make sure he doesn't.
     
  6. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

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    Jan 12, 2012

    We very, very rarely retain a middle school student. They usually have to meet the "trifecta" to be retained . . . well behind grade level academically, truant, and young for their current class.

    Retaining for lack of ambition is not an issue.
     
  7. chebrutta

    chebrutta Enthusiast

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    Jan 12, 2012

    Depends. I find, very often, that capable students in MS just kind of check out for a bit. Hormones, social behaviors - grades just aren't very important to them. Doesn't mean they should repeat - just means they're going through a stage.

    However, we're on a credit system now. If they fail three semesters in any combination of classes, they have to repeat (unless they make up the classes at the FVS).
     
  8. donziejo

    donziejo Devotee

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    I teach 6th grade and I would not let a child of mine be retained. So I would say no.
     
  9. Maryhf

    Maryhf Connoisseur

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    The bigger question is whether his lack of ambition will hinder his continued success. How can he possibly pass grade 7 if he isn't doing work now? So IMO this lack of ambition needs to be addressed immediately. It seems to me that it's his responsibility to prove he can handle the increased work load of a higher grade level. Every effort needs to be put forth NOW to intervene and get him on track to pass.That means whatever grounding/non-electronic world that requires. Check his assignments daily and make him do them. Period. I wouldn't put any effort into arguing with the school about retention if it's truly his lack of effort that is hindering him. The effort needs to go toward rescuing this boy.
    Sarge, lack of ambition truly does begin at grade 6 and even lower. I see students every day wasting their intelligence. They have time to work in school and get help from teachers but they choose to draw little pictures in notebooks instead. They don't have the support at home that I know Blue wants to provide for her GS. I'm sorry to be harsh but if this boy can get A's he's must be working really hard to fail. I hope retention is not the consequence because it certainly has mixed results but he needs to understand that it is a possibility.
     
  10. CindyBlue

    CindyBlue Cohort

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    Jan 19, 2012

    Why not? If a student didn't know the material, and/or was immature for his/her age group, and/or was really struggling? That repeat year might be just what he/she needs to grow up a bit, and to get the foundation he/she needs for the next year...??? Should he/she just be passed though the system, learning very little, until he/she doesn't graduate from high school?
     
  11. donziejo

    donziejo Devotee

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    Jan 19, 2012

    [Should he/she just be passed though the system, learning very little, until he/she doesn't graduate from high school






    No, the child should have interventions at school to catch up. The child can give up electives etc to go to remediation. Hopefully, the child will have parents that contribute to help him/her at home during homework time. The retention students I have this year still lack skills...for various reasons. I would not let a child of mine be retained because of the social issues that go along with it. I haven't seen retention work. ( I have only worked in a state that retains since August) My former state (Utah) does not retain....look at their graduation rate. My opinion.
     
  12. Jem

    Jem Aficionado

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    Jan 19, 2012

    I agree that he probably shouldn't be held back.

    But a thought-would passing him through show him that a lack of ambition holds no consequences? Not knowing him or his thought process, I can't answer that. Blue, do you think he recognizes his current position and has a desire to work harder in the future? Or will this reinforce the fact that he can skip the work in areas he finds distasteful and he'll be able to move on anyhow?

    I went to a small high school were our teachers were very relaxed. About 15 of us were in all the AP classes, and we procrastinated on papers, spent much more time on band and drama than math, etc. But we knew our stuff, if you know what I mean. We could hold our own in group discussions, we had an amazing test score average and most of us went on to Ivy League/Big 10 schools. We were not taught that there consequences to avoiding work, and it bit us in the butt when we got to college.

    After several years of getting dinged for not turning papers in on time, I think it finally clicked for me. But it is not helping a student to recognize they CAN do the work while allowing them not to do it. It will catch up to them, and they will suffer for it.
     

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