How do you set up your class library?

Discussion in 'Elementary Education Archives' started by snickydog, Apr 13, 2007.

  1. snickydog

    snickydog Groupie

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    Apr 13, 2007

    I'm preparing to (hopefully) have an elementary classroom next year, and I was wondering how you set up your library (organization, check out, displays of books you've read or author studies, etc.).

    Any ideas?
     
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  3. prettyinpink

    prettyinpink Rookie

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    I have mine organized by reading level and then fiction and non-fiction...we are lucky enough to have recieved 12,000 worth of classroom libraries per classroom this year which made this a much easier task!!
     
  4. snickydog

    snickydog Groupie

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    Whoa..... $12,000 of books per room???
     
  5. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    Apr 13, 2007

  6. prettyinpink

    prettyinpink Rookie

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    yea we have an amazing community partner with St. Paul Travelers!
     
  7. teacherwannaB

    teacherwannaB Companion

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    I love Mrs. Newingham's classroom library! She has over 2,000 books in her library catalog. I downloaded her book basket labels, and her genre posters, as well as her thumbs up and thumbs down sign, and her thick and thin question posters. Even if I don't end up using them all, they are nice to have.

    I have started my own book collection, and I have about 50 books for grades 2-6. When I see deals I can't pass up, I can't help myself. I've got several Magic Tree House books at Walmart for $2.50 each, and a hand full of bargains at Books-A-Million each for a dollar or two each. Then there is a used book store where I live that will accept trades, and she has a good selection of kids books, but I only get the ones that are in really good condition. There is going to be a used book sale at the library at the end of the month that I am looking forward to. I am very interested in childhood literacy and literacy across the curriculum- and I plan on getting a masters in reading instruction.
    So I figure that I need to start building a stash now. Plus its fun! :)
     
  8. mariah

    mariah Rookie

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    I use an adapted version of Newingham's organization. A large majority of my books are leveled and they have different dot combinations so my first graders can easily choose "just right" books for their browsing bags. The unleveled books are sorted into fiction/nonfiction categories.
     
  9. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    This works great for the lower grades. I don't plan on leveling my books because I want my 5th graders to know how to find books that are just right for them. I found a poster somewhere online. I know I bookmarked it. But, this poster explains how to find a book that's just right. I only plan to put my books in order by genres.
     
  10. snickydog

    snickydog Groupie

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    So, what kind of range of books do you purchase in terms of reading level? (For example, if you teach second grade, you have kindy through fourth grade, etc.) As a teacher starting out (not yet knowing what grade I'd teach in the el ed years), what would be a good starting point?
     
  11. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Me, too, peachy. My library is ordered like a real library. Fiction by author, separate section for fantasy, historical fiction. Biography and non-fiction are by subject. Reference books are in another section. I keep class sets of books out of reach, except for one or two on the shelves.
     
  12. mariah

    mariah Rookie

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    Snicky, I have a large range as a result of books ordered from Scholastic, but it's turned out to be good for my first graders. I have books starting in the emergent levels (DRA 1 -3, GRL A/B) all the way up into some good chapter books (DRA 20s/30s, GRL M/N). With the huge range of readering levels I might have in any given year, this is working out for me. I do have a lot of books in my middle levels (DRA 10, 12, 14) as my end of year standards are DRA 18 for my kids. So those middle levels are where a lot of my kids really spend some time.

     
  13. Miss Kirby

    Miss Kirby Fanatic

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    Most of my books are leveled by reading level. Then I have a ton books that I keep on my teacher shelf organized by topic. I'll keep books I use for reading minilessons together, rhyming activities, as well as math. Then I have books for social studies and science topics, and holidays. I have a display shelf so for each unit or holiday, I put thoes books out. The kids can take seven or so books from their leveled book basket, and then a book or two from the display shelf.

    I have these kids (usually my low ones) that have 0 books from their leveled basket, and a bunch of chapter books or nonfiction books. I'm glad they have interest in thosE, but they aren't reading. It's frustrating. When I catch it I have been asking them to read me a page, usually they'll read a couple sight words, and then tell me they can't read it. I tell them they need to find a just right book, something that they can read and it's fun to read. The more they keep readng just right books then later on they'll be able to read those chapter books!

    I need to show this to my class at the beginning if the year.
    http://www.brainpopjr.com/reading/books/choosingabook/
     
  14. teacherwannaB

    teacherwannaB Companion

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    Snickydog- I read somewhere (I think it was on scholastic.com, but can't remember for sure) to go for about 2 grades below and above your target grade. I am pretty sure that my district uses GRL but not positive since I have only been in the field for observations. I do plan on leveling my books though, especially for younger ones- as Peachy said. I have an excel spread sheet that I am using and I catalog my books and have a column for the grade level and GRL.

    Anyway- if you think you want to teach for example- third grade- I would collect books targeting grades 1-5...
     
  15. hescollin

    hescollin Fanatic

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    Be sure and put your name on every book you pay for. If and when you move grades or schools there won't be any question about who paid for the book.
     
  16. snickydog

    snickydog Groupie

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    Thanks for all the good tips!!!

    What system do you use for leveling books?
     
  17. hescollin

    hescollin Fanatic

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    We are an AR school PK including 12. We are a very small rural school. Every grade levels all our books the same. The lower grades are in baskets and the older grades are on shelves. We check out like public libraries with pockets and cards in the books.

    Leveling books.
    www.renlearn.com AR click on quizzes. In the blank type in author or use the arrow button and go to author and type in author. Tells the points the books is worth, grade level and etc.
    Leveled Books Database:
    http://books.atozteacherstuff.com/leveled-books/


    All AR books are kept together and other books are together along the other wall. First and Second grade room books are kept in plastic baskets. 3rd , 4th, 5tth, 6th and etc are on shelves. In the reading room K or emergent readers and first, second and third levels are kept in baskets and others on shelves. There are only AR books in the reading room. We have a reading room and reading teacher, she gives extra reading help. This is like a library. Students Star test in the reading room (4 computers) and in their classrooms. All the classrooms have three or four computers. AR dots. Green=1.0 to 1.5, Blue 1.6 to 2.0, Red 2..1 to 2.5, Yellow 2.6 to 3.0, Orange 3.1 to 4.0, I can’t remember until I go back to school the other colors. We use the same colors for all classrooms for that level. Reading room, LD room and classrooms all have the same color for the same level. All books have the wrap around AR label with the book number, level and points it is worth. And the dot is just above this label along the edge, so you can see the level at a quick glance. Use clear shipping tape to cover and protect the labels. And keep the dots from popping off. *****buy the wrap around labels at the AR site. www.renlearn.com 3 ¾ by 1 ½ , click on On Line Store---yellow spot, the green box, next click on reading, next click on AR and go down to the AR Handwritten book labels, Pack of 100……
    *******If you have lots of books than divide the levels into more baskets. And this will depend on how many books you have for each subject. Mice, Earth, Birthday, Jobs, Christmas, Filmstrip, Fairy Tales, Curious George, Bears, Eggs, Mystery, Dinosaurs and Monsters, Animals, Cats and Dogs, Holidays, Eric Carle, (Clifford, Amelia Bedilla, Arthur) Birds, Horses, Pond, Halloween, Thanksgiving, Rain forest, and etc….. If you have more questions let me know…. I don’t think there is any right way or wrong way. Just whatever works for you….

    * Teach them www.bookadventure.com. Some students love to read the books and then take the bookadventure.com reading comprehension test. It tracks points earned and some kids really like this. If you have an accelerated reader program in your school it works the same way.
     
  18. NewbieTeachr

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    Thift stores that offer half off days (like Salvation Army) are a great place to look too because often there are good quality books there. My old school district where I interned often gave away free books that the schools no longer wanted. I've found some great books that way too.
     
  19. MissFroggy

    MissFroggy Aficionado

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    My books are organized by genre. I also have baskets of genre organized loosely by level, easier and harder. My kids don't check them out, but they don't take them home either. I have the kids help sort the books at the beginning of the year, and make the labels for the baskets.

    Some new additions to my baskets this year: partner reading basket, where are the books are doubled, and favorite authors baskets. I have to buy a new book shelf, also! I will have them graph what they read by genre, as we work to read 100 books for Classrooms Care.

    Here is a tip, that really works for me: In the library, I keep extra pages of all the forms my kids need for SSR, like reading logs, contracts, etc. I staple a colorful manila folder right on the BB and label it. The papers fit in easily, and the kids can get what they need for any given issue they may have. This is great because I don't want to have to get a paper for them during a reading conference with another child.
     
  20. bdteach

    bdteach Companion

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    Jul 25, 2007

    Here's my predicament - I've inherited a classroom with a ton of books. Sounds great, right? It's not. I don't know what to do with them, how to organize them, etc. Many of them seem like they wouldn't be of interest to my students. The majority of them are not books from a series, or books that are recognizable. Those that are perfect for science, or social studies, made it easy--but what about the rest of them? I have an awful lot of books that my son read when he was in 2nd grade that I think are more popular (Magic Tree House, Junie B. Jones, A to Z Mysteries) that I'd like to bring in, but I hate to get rid of the others... Any suggestions for organizing them? Every time I start, I feel overwhelmed. My fear is my students will feel the same way in this mess.
     
  21. texangrade2

    texangrade2 New Member

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    Jul 25, 2007

    I'm kind of in the same situation. I'm moving rooms this year from grade 1 to grade 2 and there was a lot of stuff left behind. I kept an extra filing cabinet and I'm storing a bunch of it in there. I don't want to get rid of much until I've taught 2nd for at least a year. I might not know that I need something and toss it or donate it.
     

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