How do you "move up" in your district?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Preschool0929, May 26, 2017.

  1. Preschool0929

    Preschool0929 Comrade

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    May 26, 2017

    I teach in the 2nd largest (and best paying) district in my state. I've been in this district for 6 years and have been trying to move to a resource/administrative position for the past 2 with no luck. The competition is steep. Not only do educators from my district want these positions, but because we pay so well, we get candidates from all the surrounding districts. They don't do any internal candidate options or transfer requests, you just apply for a position like everyone else.

    I have a few admin that have acted as "mentors" to me this year, and they've all told me that they were pretty much hand-picked. Situations where there was an opening, but they didn't even apply, someone higher up just called and said "we want you for this job". It's so confusing. I feel like I'll never get an admin position because they are so out of reach.

    What's the process in your district for moving up/out of the classroom? Do you feel like it's fair?
     
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  3. MrTempest

    MrTempest Companion

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    May 26, 2017

    In my district you have to show that you are completely incompetent. You have to have the ability to take actions that make everyone else stress out as they try to make sense of your nonsense. The ability to boast about your fictitious success is a must. Knowing how to skew data to show some semblance of progress is a necessity. Perhaps most important is to be able to build an impenetrable imaginary bubble around yourself so you are not subject to the things you see or what others may say.
     
    Last edited: May 26, 2017
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  4. greendream

    greendream Cohort

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    May 26, 2017

    This sounds like a passage from Catch-22.:D
     
  5. whizkid

    whizkid Rookie

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    Ahahahahaha I love it!
     
  6. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    May 27, 2017

    What is a resource/administrative position?

    In my district you must first have an administrative teaching license. After that, you need to apply for, interview for, and enroll in a district leadership program, which is fairly competitive. If you pass the leadership program, you end up in the admin pool. From there it's a combination of your resume, self-promotion skills, and connections to other administrators.
     
  7. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    May 27, 2017

    have you been teaching six years or have you been in that district for six years?
     
  8. FourSquare

    FourSquare Fanatic

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    It's kind of true, isn't it? The worst principal I've literally ever seen was just voted for some fancy award in our district. I'm like...if they only knew.
     
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  9. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    I assume you have your administrative license? Here, it's not that common for teachers to "move up" to admin positions. Most teachers I know have no interest in being an admin. If you have the license you can apply for the position just like anyone else. Positions are open to internal and external candidates at the same time- there isn't a period where the position is only internal for awhile first or anything like that. We had four admin openings in my district this year. Three were filled by external candidates and one was an internal transfer. Being an internal candidate could help or hurt your chances just depending on what people think of you, IMO. One of our new instructional coaches this year wasn't really well liked and didn't seem to do very well in the position. He was let go because the position was eliminated. He applied for an AP opening at my school and wasn't even given a courtesy interview. I'm in a tiny district where everyone knows everyone pretty well, so I can definitely see it being a possibility that people are "handpicked." However, they'd still have to go through the interview process and other candidates would be interviewed as well.
     
  10. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    May 28, 2017

    I moved up at my previous school by volunteering as a teacher leader and by going back to school for my M.Ed. in Educational Leadership. I wound up as a co-department chair, but found that was as far as I could go without my Principal's License. Now I'm at another school and will start my license classes in October.
     
  11. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    May 29, 2017

    This is basically how things are here as well. We do have a number of curriculum consultants in our school board; the consultants are centrally located and work with teachers across the board and provide PD. Consultant positions are posted and any teacher with the qualifications (usually extensive experience across a wide variety of grades) may apply.
     
  12. nstructor

    nstructor Comrade

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    May 29, 2017

    There is NO moving up! Teachers make much more than administrators by serving on paid committees, becoming lead teachers, heading clubs, athletics, etc. . .
     
  13. AmyMyNamey

    AmyMyNamey Comrade

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    I love this post! It is a scathing indictment of administration in my own district. Honest to God, they seem to hand-picked the least qualified brown-nosing twits they can find to lead us all straight to Hell.
     
  14. Janeway

    Janeway Rookie

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    In my old district you had to have a Master's degree in what avenue you wanted to go in- curriculum, technology, leadership. To be an AP or P you'd need to take the exam after obtaining your M.Ed., and be well liked by your current administrators to connect you to an opening or move you up to an open position at your school. All the APs and other leaders while I was there had been teachers there before moving up. For 700 kids we had 2 APs, 2 instructional coaches,a Dean of Students, and a program coordinator. All of whom did as little as possible and made the teacher's job more
    difficult because they'd refuse to discipline problem students which made the situation worse or they made burdensome instructional demands that created mountains of redundant paper work.
     
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  15. msleep

    msleep Rookie

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    Jun 6, 2017

    Please do not call it "moving up."
     
  16. MrTempest

    MrTempest Companion

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    Jun 7, 2017

    [​IMG]
     
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  17. Preschool0929

    Preschool0929 Comrade

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    Jun 7, 2017

    Didn't mean to abandon this post! Maybe it's called different things across districts. I'm not interested in an AP or P position, but because I teach in a very large district, we have a large number of "resource" positions that support teachers. They are usually titled things like "district wide behavior resource coach" or "special education resource specialist", but they are basically positions that go into classrooms and support teachers or students who are struggling.
     
  18. Preschool0929

    Preschool0929 Comrade

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    Jun 7, 2017

    Why's that? I do consider it "moving up" to move up in pay scale so that my husband doesn't haven't to work 2 jobs to support our children and I don't have to work 50-60 hour work weeks just to keep up with my ever expanding caseload.

    Is it a more important position? Definitely not. But better pay, better hours, and less responsibility sounds good to me.
     
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  19. msleep

    msleep Rookie

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    Jun 7, 2017

    What you described is not moving up. It is moving on.
     
  20. greendream

    greendream Cohort

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    Jun 7, 2017

    It depends on the organizational chart. Moving to a position that supervises your current position is literally moving up.
     
  21. MrTempest

    MrTempest Companion

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    Jun 10, 2017

    I would consider someone who is "moving on" as someone who is leaving a particular profession, such as a teacher leaving the realm of education entirely.
     

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