How do you memorize your students' name?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by heiyanquanben, Jul 4, 2018.

  1. heiyanquanben

    heiyanquanben New Member

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    Hi! I find it very challenging to match students' face and their name, how did you do it? How many students in your class? Thanks in advance!
     
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  3. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    I make a seating chart.
     
  4. geoteacher

    geoteacher Habitué

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    For me they have to sit in alpha order at the beginning of the year. While they work on warm up exercises, I work on their names. It takes awhile to get all 160. The biggest challenges are twins and other students whose appearance is similar.
     
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  5. TrademarkTer

    TrademarkTer Groupie

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    For me I best match the writing so I learn the names as I start to return work.
     
  6. TnKinder

    TnKinder Companion

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    When my students come in for staggered entry, I take a picture that goes on the name tag. When labeling the cubbies, I study the name with the picture. I usually have 18-25 students each year.
     
  7. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Phenom

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    I have a seating chart with pictures.

    I’ve got between 15 and 35 kids per class, with 5 to 6 classes a day.
     
  8. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

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    An idea I've used is to associate a mnemonic clue with the student. For example, Kyle--perhaps his face is somewhat shaped like a kite (you have to use your imagination quite a bit). Maybe Mary has a big smile that makes her look merry. First day of class, I quiz myself by trying to remember the students' names, a few at a time (I just concern myself with first names at this point). The students appreciate that I am taking the time to learn their names and they enjoy watching the teacher's struggling memory in action. I have difficulty remembering faces, and I find that as time goes on, I remember other features more than faces, such as the manner in which a student walks, facial expressions (which surprisingly vary from student to student), and other physical features.

    The big problem occurs when I see someone out of context, such as at the mall. It's a weird phenomenon! I don't recognize the person at first, but then all of a sudden it's like an explosion in my brain. Kaboom! I realize whom I'm seeing. A couple of humorous examples. I was teaching one day and my sister suddenly appeared in the door. I did not recognize her at first, not until the "kaboom" moment. After school one day, my parents were walking down the hall. Same thing--another "kaboom".

    Another weird example, back in my camp counseling days, a kid at camp looked surprisingly like a kid in a popular TV show. He didn't have the same name, and he tried very hard to convince everyone that he just happened to look like that TV kid. Anyway, a few years later, I was watching a movie on TV that featured this kid and noticed the specific way he was walking in the movie--"Kaboom!" It was him!
     
  9. Aces

    Aces Comrade

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    Jul 5, 2018

    Seating chart, they sit in alphabetical order.
     
  10. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Fanatic

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    This sounds weird, but at the beginning of the school year I try to say their name as often as possible in the first few weeks in order to associate the student’s name with their face. To demonstrate, and this is a fictitious example, but it should hopefully drive the point home: “Good morning Samuel. Did you enjoy your weekend? Well Sam, I hope you remembered that we have a quiz today and studied to prepare for it.” I do this in such a way that it doesn’t sound overly redundant and the students don’t catch on to what I’m doing.

    My motto is: “Repetition, repetition, repetition I repeat, is the only way to master a feat.” I heard this phrase from of my many science teachers in high school and it just stuck with me. Take it as you will.
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2018
  11. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    We play a name game on day one, name tags on desks.
     
  12. rpan

    rpan Cohort

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    I don’t use seating charts unless I need to for classroom management purposes so as I do the class roll I make sure I really look at the face associated with the name and try to memorise some distinguishing features. I have about 110 to 140 names to remember each year and I try to memorise all their names by day 3.
     
  13. Missy

    Missy Aficionado

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    Over the summer I look at the yearbook for the previous year to learn all of the kids coming into the grade I teach. Also, I get a lot of siblings of former students, and sometimes that helps and sometimes not!
     
  14. CharRMS

    CharRMS Companion

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    This past year I had a little fun trying to remember the names of my middle schoolers. I took the last 5 minutes or so of class and had everyone line up across the room and face me. I would go down the line and try to give each kid's name. If I messed up, I had to start at the beginning of the line again until I could go all the way through or the bell rang. By the third day, I could go through pretty much the whole line with only a few I messed up because I always have problems with students who I think they look like a different name haha! The kids seemed to like it because they thought it was funny when I messed up and had to go back to the beginning.
     
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  15. nstructor

    nstructor Cohort

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    What name game do you play?
     
  16. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    I teach grade 3. We sit in circle on perimeter of carpet. First kid says his name. Second kid says first kid’s name and then adds his/her name. Third kid says first and second name and adds his/hers. Continue around circle, if someone forgets a name, that child whispers name to help. I go last....
     
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  17. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    I make a seating chart with pictures a few days before students arrive and spend a few minutes each day looking at it. By the time students get settled, I know them by seat, and I can typically match name to face (and seat) by lunch.
     
  18. Teacher234

    Teacher234 Comrade

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    Oddly enough, remembering names of students has always been very easy for me. I have 12 students. In the beginning of my teaching career (years 1 and 2), I had around 35 students. Had no difficulty with remembering their names.
     
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  19. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    I would imagine it would be very easy with just 12-35 students! When I subbed in elementary I had the whole class memorized within the first 30 minutes.

    I have to actively try to memorize my high school students' names. I typically have 100-170 students. The first two periods are easier than the rest. I guess I get brain overload, lol. My students sit alphabetically and I give them partner work that lasts about 20 minutes on the first and second days. I use this time to study their names and placement. I can't remember them outside of class for a couple of weeks though.
     
  20. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

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    Seating chart, whether I create it or they pick their seats (depends on the class). I look at that when they're working and quiz myself. Handing back papers helps the most for sure. I also always make sure to address them by name if they raise their hand.
    My class sizes range anywhere from 2-20. It takes me about four days to have 95% of the kids' names down.
     
  21. blazer

    blazer Connoisseur

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    I find a seating plan makes a big difference. Make a plan and sit the kids where you want them to be. Then have the plan printed out when you take the class. I would put the plan on Publisher and project it as the class arrived so they knew where to sit. If a pairing caused problems I could move a kid and adjust the plan. I always kept 2 seats right in front of me empty and if a kid was a pain in the lesson I could move them closer to me. Also with the plan I could put the kids' books out in the correct place before they arrived so no arguments.
     

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