How do you handle inadequacy?

Discussion in 'Preschool' started by MissLiger4, Sep 15, 2015.

  1. MissLiger4

    MissLiger4 New Member

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    Sep 15, 2015

    This year, I got a new assistant teacher. She's had no experience in a classroom and I was told she was supposed to be my equal. I'm alternatively certified, been teaching for 6 years and I know this shouldn't bother me but several aspects in my classroom make me feel like I'm drowning.

    I have a mixed age classroom, 3-5 year olds. 4 of my 3 year olds are either diagnosed or undiagnosed with deficits. We have 21 students and these 4 kids need someone with them at all times. My teacher doesn't know how to do this or how to implement learning strategies in the class (despite my leading and teaching her).

    I guess I'm wondering how you handle feeling like you aren't doing enough even when you're doing everything you possibly can? I feel like there is so much more I could be doing but I don't know what it is because I'm literally doing everything I know to do.... I'm just overwhelmed.
     
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  3. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    Sep 15, 2015

    I eat a lot. I drink a lot, too. And I get little sleep. So, yeah, I don't handle it well. :lol:

    That's prob not the answer you were looking for, but its the truth. Good luck!
     
  4. Preschool0929

    Preschool0929 Cohort

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    Sep 17, 2015

    I teach spec. ed. preschool in the public schools and each year I get an extra assistant or 2 that are hired to be 1:1 supports for intense students. This year, my paras are crazy inadequate. No matter how much I teach them, it's still the same every day. Some things that have helped me are: making a schedule of duties for the day (work with this child on this skill today), copying articles about working with students with certain special needs and giving them to them (so that not all the direction is just coming from me), creating an assistant handbook listing every single do/don't for working in my classroom, and having a "morning meeting" every day to discuss what should happen during the day. It's really hard to not just teach the children, but to have to teach the adults in your classroom too. I would also suggest having a really honest sit-down conversation and letting her know what isn't being done that you feel needs to be. Good luck!
     
  5. youwillrise

    youwillrise Rookie

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    Sep 17, 2015

    thats a tough situation. perhaps she is feeling unsure of herself and afraid. maybe take her aside and ask her how she feels things are going and what she thinks might need improvement. maybe point her to some resources that might help her become more active and efficient in the classroom. it is scary being in a classroom for the first time. i am an assistant teacher with about 7 years of experience and it took me a couple or few years to not be afraid of making a mistake in front of the teacher i was working with or the director.

    i remember not wanting to lead group times or activities because i was afraid to be told i was doing it wrong.

    where i work, the assistant teachers are recognized as teachers and professionals. we do almost everything the teachers do (lesson planning, daily parent communication, leading activities and groups) the only thing we dont do is meet with parents for parent-teacher conferences - we do add our ideasn to and help to write the conference notes and eval notes that are shared with parents.

    but yeah, just see how she is taking everything in. i know it can be frustrating when you have a class full of children who you want to teach and care for but things dont seem like theyre going right. it is especially hard when you have someone in your classroom, but still feel like youre doing it on your own.

    id say maybe even have your admin (director, principal, head...whatever you may have at your school) observe...not because you want her in trouble, but maybe they would have some tips and ideas for her improvement. sometimes outside eyes are helpful.

    best luck! hope it turns out well.
     
  6. Beverly

    Beverly Comrade

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    Sep 20, 2015

    With your assistant, I recommend just directly asking her what parts of the job make her uncomfortable. People often don't like talking about that stuff, no matter how kind, helpful, or open you are with them. Work on building that relationship, and hopefully she will start feeling more confident and taking on more responsibilities. Also, find something that she's really comfortable with right now, and make sure she has lots of opportunities to do it.

    As far as the overwhelming needs of the students, remember that it is not just your perception- your employer should be giving you more help! I know that sometimes they just don't provide you with the help, for financial or philosophical reasons or whatever, but keep documenting incidents and standing up for yourself and your class. And at the very least, remember that sometimes it really is just the composition of the class and you're not failing them. I'm not sure what you have tried so far... what parts of the day/routine are giving you guys the most challenges right now?
     

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