High Scope lesson planning

Discussion in 'Preschool' started by lauriloulou, Aug 6, 2008.

  1. lauriloulou

    lauriloulou Rookie

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    Aug 6, 2008

    I just went to a week long High Scope training last week and want to make major changes in my room since I realize I'm not using it correctly. I want to focus more on planning and reviewing, have all materials available for the "do," and listen more to children's interests for small groups. Is there a forum specifically for High Scope that any of you know about?

    Any other High Scope users? I didn't think I would change my mind about High Scope but I completely did! I love how developmental it is. And the lab preschool was nothing fancy (of course school is not in session), just TONS of real items and a great area to explore.
     
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  3. WaProvider

    WaProvider Fanatic

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    Aug 6, 2008

    sounds cool-tell me more
     
  4. lauriloulou

    lauriloulou Rookie

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    Well, it was the week long intro to High Scope and the instructor was excellent! She has been in education for 34 years and teaches many children with special needs.

    She talked a lot about praising vs. encouragement and conflict resolution. I so believe in everything she said but putting it into practice will require a lot of practice. I want to read the book Conscious Discipline by Becky Bailey to help in that area.

    How much do you know about High Scope? HS basically focuses on 5 key developmental indicators which focus on active learning. The heart of their curriculum is the plan-do-review process. It really is getting children to think independently and make plans, follow through with them, and then reflect on what they did during work time.
     
  5. WaProvider

    WaProvider Fanatic

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    I really don't know about High Scope-but I hear about it. I like the idea of plan-do-review. Sounds like the children are very involved in all 3 sections? I liked the way that you said you were going to work on "listen (ing) more to the children in small group"-sounds a bit like the project plan we work on here.
     
  6. lauriloulou

    lauriloulou Rookie

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    Aug 7, 2008

    So, do you do themes? We did them last year, but the other lead teacher and myself want to move away from them. I mean, we still want to teach about dinos and space, etc. b/c ultimately, some kids are interested in those things, but we want a different approach with more kid directed activities instead of teacher directed.

    What is your project plan?
     
  7. EDUK8_ME

    EDUK8_ME Cohort

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  8. Blue

    Blue Aficionado

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    Aug 8, 2008

    Yeah!!!!!!!! A preschool need not be theme based to be DAP. If you see that, and are ready to move away from themes, you have reached a higher level in educating young children. Your approach to learning should be your educational goals.

    If you use themes, they are the vehicle that you use to impart your concepts. I makes it easier and more fun to Count bears, read bear stories, and learn a new bear song.

    When you can leave the themes behind you will use the learning areas as your lesson plan concentration:

    Language and Literacy
    Cognitive
    Physical Health and Development
    Social Emotional
    Creative Arts

    Almost everything you will want to teach will fall into these catagories. These are the Creative Curriculum catagories, and I think they are similar to HighScope.
     
  9. WaProvider

    WaProvider Fanatic

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    no i don't really do themes. I mean i have a goal - like October has the pumpkin patch trip-not for the holdiay for the produce and weights and measures. I start the idea, (This is a pumpkin), link it to other things (remember the farmers we met at market-how would you like to go to a farm), and then after the topic gets some speed I back way down and watch what the children do. Sometimes we cook, sometimes we plant and so on.
     
  10. Blue

    Blue Aficionado

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    Aug 8, 2008

    Allowing the children to direct the themes is called emergent curriculum, and you can find lots about that in books and on-line.
     
  11. WaProvider

    WaProvider Fanatic

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    This is what we do----yeah!!! I present the topic-a big, round, generic topic and then the children give us the material to move forward. We place items in the room that can be used to facilitate the math part of cognitive and so on - and then the children move through it. They loose the attention and "brain gear grinding noise" when they are done and the "theme" closes and moves on.

    In our program the "projects" tend to be related to the season part of the holiday theme. So for sept/oct/nov we tend to be in the woods/forest talking about animals, leaves changing, things going dormant, hibernation and so on. For Dec/jan/ we tend to talk about winter, polar bears (we live near canada) and so on. So we are teacher "bait-ed" and child lead I say.:lol:
     
  12. WaProvider

    WaProvider Fanatic

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    yep, I love emergent. sometimes I am confused as to how to document and I am really confused as to how you could be emergent and in a public school at the same time?:confused:
     
  13. lauriloulou

    lauriloulou Rookie

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    YES! YES! YES! To both of you! :) This is where I want to move my room this year. When I was at training, I thought of the art projects I did. While they were all different, it was still teacher directed (ex: space ships...they were all bowls covered in tin foil but decorated different). Why did they all have to be bowls covered in tin foil? Maybe they didn't want it that way. I just want the kids to use their neurons to make connections. Kids have great ideas and I want to see what they come up with.

    Blue,
    How does your lesson plan look? Do you have those areas on it and go from there?
     
  14. lauriloulou

    lauriloulou Rookie

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    BTW, we do monthly family projects. When our state consultant came to evaluate us, we got marked down for our scarecrows (outline of a scarecrow that families decorated). She told us to send home a blank sheet of paper. Some of the staff didn't believe parents would do it. You should have seen some of the ornaments that came in. I also said to make something for a spring garden...wow! I had all kinds of cool stuff.
     
  15. WaProvider

    WaProvider Fanatic

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    we make a post lesson plan. we start with the theme in a box in the middle and like a brainstorming paper we chart where the children are going and what they have done. I was so tickled when I saw it in NAEYC's article this month. That is when I know I am moving in the right track. Ours is still hand written but it look much like theirs.
     
  16. Mrs_Barrett

    Mrs_Barrett Cohort

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    My program uses high scope. I'm going to be doing better this year planning with my associates. I'm curretnly in a high scope class right now. Second time taking it too.
     
  17. WaProvider

    WaProvider Fanatic

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    I really like the family projects we receive. We just call them family hours and don't really hand out assignments. How do you do these in your program.
     
  18. Blue

    Blue Aficionado

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    Aug 11, 2008

    My lesson plan has the major areas (Language/literacy, cognitive, Physical/health development, Social-Emotional, and creative arts) down the side. The five days of the week are across the top. Each of the major areas is defined in detail in the Creative Curriculum book, and provides ideas of what they mean. It takes a lot of work and practice to get all of to come together.

    I seems like there is not enough room to describe in detail, but I just ask for notations to remind teachers of what they are to do. I find that if they don't plan, it doesn't happen. I plan to supervise lesson planning at a weekly meeting this year.
     
  19. lauriloulou

    lauriloulou Rookie

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    Each month we send home a family project. In Oct. we sent home a scarecrow, Nov. a turkey feather, Dec. a blank sheet for them to create something to hang on our tree, Jan. we sent home mittens, Feb. a heart, March we did a reading project, and April we sent home a blank sheet for them to create something springy for our garden. I actually thought they were more creative when I sent home a blank sheet rather than a template.

    We just ask they decorate them however they like. When the child brought it back to school, s/he shared it with the class (what materials they used, etc.).
     
  20. WaProvider

    WaProvider Fanatic

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    Not that I am complaining-just learning-but if the children change gears in the middle of a week can the teachers change the plan-or are they tied to it once made?

    How do you show the child lead aspects?
     
  21. Blue

    Blue Aficionado

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    I would think that no matter what the emergent curriculum is, it would fit into the goals. I encourage the teachers to take the lead from the children.

    Since we are a non-profit center, none of our plans are written in stone. We have only the parents to please. I have worked for Head Start, which did not allow so much freedom.

    Beginning teachers have a difficult time free flowing a lesson plan, so this plan is to help them keep on track.
     

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