Help with decoding..pt. 2

Discussion in 'Second Grade' started by Master Pre-K, Jul 31, 2008.

  1. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

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    Jul 31, 2008

    Help with decoding..

    Hi All,

    Have a friend whose daughter is going into 3rd grade. Says she is really struggling with decoding skills. Has her in Sylvan right now.

    Appreciate any advice you can share! I posted this thread in 3rd grade, so please let me know if I should try 1st grade as well.

    thanks!
     
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  3. Iteach782

    Iteach782 Comrade

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    Decoding is tough. Some kids seem to get it right away, and some kids just don't. For kids who just can't get it, I try everything. I try going backwards. Instead of asking them to decode /c/ /a/ /t/, I'll tell them the word cat and ask them to break it apart into /c/ /a/ /t/. I've also gone back to the basics with them by just practicing the sounds over and over again. I've also pulled out the puppet and practiced oral blending (ex. /c/+at says cat). It's really difficult to teach kids to decode who just aren't ready for it. I think Sylvan is a good start. I also suggest in the mean time to reinforce sight words.
     
  4. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

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    thanks! this is exactly what I told my friend. I told her to try to practice root words, meanings, and sounds. And to focus on the beginning and endings as well.

    I said if she made up flash cards and practiced words such as
    chick en

    roost er

    and watched how her daughter says each sound, that means she is not getting the concept that these are blends, patterns, etc. ER always make the same sound! that is, ER sounds like errr...and she should not be saying eeee rrrrr. If she is doing that, she doesn't get it.

    I said, "Tell her E-R is the emergency room! E-R (together) always sounds like errrr." You don't have to think about it or sound it out...just add roost and er together and you get rooster!

    I also told her the poem about 'when two vowels go walking the first one does the talking.'

    any other ideas??
     
  5. Dana

    Dana Rookie

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    Has she been tested for learning disabilities. Sounds alot like my son who has dyslexia.

    Either way, I highly recommend Phonics Pathways by Dolores Hiskes (under $20 at amazon.com) You don't have to have a masters degree to do this, it's simple, fast, effective and easy for mom/grandma to help with.

    I've used it with my son and several struggling students and it has always made a huge difference.

    I dont know why, but not all the sylvan's are good at helping with blending issues. Around here, have had several students go there spending hundreds of dollars with 0 results. Again, it could be just the one's around me though.
     
  6. jeanie

    jeanie Companion

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    Aug 1, 2008

    I also play this game with students:
    1. This is done orally, with no written word to refer to. It develops phonemic awareness, which is the precursor to phonics. The teacher says the word with the sounds broken apart, (as you would do if you were sounding out a printed word) and the student guesses what word is being said. You say: What word is this? /C/A/ T/
    The student responds by telling you the word.
    It sounds really simple... but it is amazing how many early, or struggling readers actually insert some different sounds and come up with a completely different totally unexpected word. Practice this a little bit each day... remember to use some VERY simple one -syllable words to begin with. such as date, mate, wait, state, make, it, sit, all, ball, etc. Because this is an oral activity, spelling is not an issue, neither should dyslexia be an issue. It is just hearing and identifying sounds in order, and hearing all the sounds in spoken words. It is an important skill to have in place for readers.

    2. As a second step, you could take individual letter tiles or printed letter squares and push the tiles together on the desktop while you say the sounds Have the child guess the word you are saying (as in the above activity), then have the child do the tile pushing as the activity is repeated.
     
  7. firstgradeteach

    firstgradeteach Comrade

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  8. chicagoturtle

    chicagoturtle Fanatic

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    You can look up some of the DISTAR/ Direct Instruction materials- not good for comprehension at all but really good for decoding. Sigfried also wrote a book entitled how to teach your child to read in 100 easy lessons (approximate title) but it may be hard for the average joe to get it. I'm pretty sure DePaul has a tutoring lab that does DI tutoring. Not sure if it is free or comes at a cost.
     
  9. AngelM

    AngelM Rookie

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    Another good strategy is to have the child practice decoding nonsense words. I have some foam letter die from a teacher's store. We roll the die (two consonant die and one vowel dice), place them in CVC pattern and the child sounds out the nonsense word.

    For example, if you roll the letters: k, u, c, they could be arranged into the nonsense word cuk. The child would sound this out.

    This can be done with letter tiles or simply with letters written on index cards. Hope this makes sense.:)
     
  10. teacherece

    teacherece Cohort

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    If a 3rd grade child cannot decode, Wilson Language whould be an excellent choice. I just got trained and will get my certification this year when I choose a student to work with.
     
  11. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

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    This is great! I really appreciate all the help everyone. :) I am passing on your suggestions as soon as I can. I think it's important that parents know more than one approach. It is also good that we give them the terms that we use, so they won't feel so weird in parent conferences!

    And..it helps me to review these strategies as well.. I am interviewing...and principals are interested in what I know about teaching literacy skills.
     

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