Have any teachers here switched from one district to another because of problems with administration

Discussion in 'General Education' started by kgquick118, Aug 30, 2018.

  1. kgquick118

    kgquick118 Rookie

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    Aug 30, 2018

    I'm thinking of switching from one district to another, the districts are around 30 minutes apart. Anybody ever done this before and was there a lot of drama associated with it ?
     
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  3. vickilyn

    vickilyn Virtuoso

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    Aug 30, 2018

    I'm assuming that you are asking about resigning from your current job in one district, and taking a new job in a completely new district. If by district you mean your pay will no longer come from the district that you are in now, you are simply resigning and going to work elsewhere. If, however, you mean same district, different school, pay continues on without any changes, that would be a transfer, which would have much less drama and repercussions. If you are talking about quitting, you will need to know how much time you are committed to give when you announce your resignation, and be prepared to honor that time period. However if you are working at a charter school, they are usually "at will" when it comes to either letting an employee go, or should an employee choose to leave - no time period to honor.

    As you can tell, the more information you give us to work with in that initial post, the better the members will be at answering the exact question you are asking. Hope that helps.
     
  4. kgquick118

    kgquick118 Rookie

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    Yeah I'm talking about switching districts. There was nothing in my contract about having to give notice. I think the district did this so they can fire teachers at will without notice. Maybe I'm just burned out on this particular school there tends to be a lot of drama and certain students are allowed to get away with a lot more than others.
     
  5. vickilyn

    vickilyn Virtuoso

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    At will, usually the forte of charter schools, makes this a non-event. You do, however, need to double check with HR to make sure that there is no requirement for notice. I can't promise absolutely no drama, but legally, you should be fine.
     
  6. Backroads

    Backroads Fanatic

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    I just switched from a charter school to a school district. No drama. Yes, I left for a host of reasons all connected, and I can't say administration wasn't a part of it.
     
  7. Backroads

    Backroads Fanatic

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    Aug 31, 2018

    My sister-in-law switched districts a few years back when a position was offered that would change her commute from over an hour to 15 minutes. There was some drama, and she actually had to pay $1000 (her reasoning was she would earn back that money quickly on the gas and daycare savings), but nothing crazy.
     
  8. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Enthusiast

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    Whoa, full stop. Why did your SIL have to pay $1,000?! I need more information.
     
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2018
  9. Backroads

    Backroads Fanatic

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    She switched after the contract had begun and it was just one of those contractual things. Probably verbally to help replace her and in truth to get money.
     
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  10. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    Sep 1, 2018

    I've switched schools a handful times. I'm on my fourth school. I've also had a lot of colleagues do the same. There isn't usually much drama associated with it, as long as you're respectful in how you go about doing it - give enough notice and be supportive through the transition.

    In regards to the money, my current district requires something like $3,000 or $5,000 if you resign past a certain date without their support. Most times, though, people either resign before that date or they have a valid reason, and the district supports them in resigning.
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2018
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  11. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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    In my AZ contracts the fee was $2500 to pay for a sub while they searched for a replacement. Additionally, the district could lodge a complaint with DOE and take your license as well. In my second year I was going to resign in October (yeah I was that miserable) but I opted to stay for my team and the few good kids in my class. I served out my contract and bolted at the end of the year.
     
  12. heatherberm

    heatherberm Comrade

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    Sep 3, 2018

    I switched districts a few years ago. It was for a few reasons but the administration that was in place at the time was in the mix. I gave the 60-days notice required by my contract, put together enough sub plans to get my replacement through a couple of months, and happily moved on. My principal was not thrilled and tried to guilt me a little bit - 3 or 4 of us ended up resigning pretty closely together - but nothing that I'd really label as drama. It was totally worth the change. I'm so much happier where I am now. Just be really, really sure you don't have to give a certain amount of time's notice.
     
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  13. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Enthusiast

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    You’ve piqued my interest. In what ways is your new school better? Do you have more support by the new administration? Is the new school culture better?
     
  14. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Enthusiast

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    Please describe a few negative experiences you had in that district. Why did you want to leave? I imagine it was the low pay?
     
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  15. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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    For those of us who have taught / currently teach in a Title 1 school with a high needs population it's not a very original story. More than anything I wasn't very prepared as I had come from a very different community (rural and white vs. very racially and culturally diverse urban.) One of my biggest gripes, again not original, was the lack of admin support and help. I felt like I was drowning a lot in terms of classroom management and even when I started to find my way and asked for help with instruction, I was met with apathy. We even had instructional coaches (who were too lazy to actually help us.) One of my breaking points was being in a meeting discussing the students' low reading scores with our principal (she was expressing fake interest by asking "what can we do?" even though we had gone to them all year) and the district's literacy specialist/ director (whatever) was in the meeting. I said, "I would love for somebody to come in an model a reading lesson for me.'' Both my principal and the literacy ''leader'' in the district just laughed. When I left the meeting I asked my colleague "Did you hear that?" Because I wanted to make sure I wasn't just making stuff up or misinterpreting.
    When you have behaviors (we had the WORST group, you know the "one'' with the highest number of office referrals, etc.), LOW academic achievement and apathy from your admin, it's a recipe for disaster. I also had an ODD/ ADHD child in my class and didn't get much help with him either.
    And yeah low pay certainly didn't help. On April Fool's during that year our house had been burglarized and they stole my laptop, which really was the only possession that I owned. By mid - year I just really wanted to go home. It was also personal as I had made friends with some teachers, but there was drama among them and I got sucked in to it. The personal stuff didn't help.
    Looking back I am glad I stayed the year as I definitely think it made me a better teacher. But at that point in my life I just had to get out. I started gaining all kinds of weight from stress eating... and it's very cliched, but I dreaded going to work. There were days drama among my students started before the day even officially began. I'd go to pick them up from the playground and they'd already be fighting.
    Regarding that group: the other teachers who had been in the positions all left because they didn't want to teach the group of kids. We, all new teachers, got them and no support. Our mentor was a joke. If it weren't for the 2nd and 4th grade teachers, I would have lost my mind completely.
    Find your people. It's the most important lesson I learned that year!
    :)
     
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  16. heatherberm

    heatherberm Comrade

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    Sep 3, 2018

    A lot of it is just being in a position that I think is a better fit. In my former district I was teaching gen ed 6th grade science in a 6-8 building. I really wanted to be in an elementary school working with younger kids, and I really wanted a special education position. I knew it wasn't a perfect fit when I accepted the job, but I really needed a job and assumed that after a year or two, I could move somewhere else within the district. I didn't realize at the time that, in this particular district, you can't request a transfer until you're tenured (which is after 4 years). I expressed interest in staying in the district if I could move to an elementary position, gen ed or special ed, but they weren't open to that. (And I do understand not wanting to make exceptions because the tenure rule is in the contract, but it was pretty frustrating because there were lots of advertised special ed openings all the time.) Anyway, in my current district I teach a 3rd and 4th grade 15:1:1 special class (self-contained) which I love, love, love. The smaller setting just fits me better, the negative behaviors of elementary don't bother me as much as the negative behaviors of middle school, and while I actually did love teaching science, I like having my hands in all subjects. I just didn't think I could cut it for 2 more years at my old district, waiting for tenure.

    Administration was part of it though. I loved my grade level administrator in my previous building, but the principal was moving from a small charter school to our large urban district and he was just completely in over his head. Behavior across all the grade levels was pretty out of control and there just wasn't great support for it. I'd previously worked as a classroom aide in a Day Treatment program working with kids with emotional/behavioral needs so I wasn't unaccustomed to that level of behavior, but that program had a lot of extra support and this building didn't have nearly enough. Most of the administrators and the social worker worked really hard, they were just stretched way, way too thin. In that regard, I guess my issue was really with the people above them. (This principal ended up leaving the year after I left and I understand from friends who still work there that the new principal has been great and things have really turned around.)

    That particular school also had a really high ENL population. Each grade level had 2 teams and one team had all the students with 504s or IEPs and the other team had all the students with ENL services. We had the ENL students which I didn't even know until they were in my classroom. The district/school did not prepare me AT ALL for that and in science and social studies, they got no additional language support. I actually really wish I could go back and re-do that because I loved working with them - it was incredible to watch the growth they made over the course of a school year - I just had NO idea what to do with them and could do a better job now. It sounds like this is something that district has gotten a lot better at. Their new teacher academy includes a lot of ENL training now and they offer a lot more ENL-related PD.

    I do feel like, in general, it's easier to find support in my current building/district though it's a much smaller district so that's probably part of it. I think *everyone* in the former district just had too much on their plates. My current district isn't a rich district - we're actually closing a couple of schools next year - but I've never had any issues getting supplies, supplemental materials, things for an after school club, etc. purchased as long as I can explain why I think my students would benefit. I wouldn't necessarily say this school has a better culture - as tough as it was in my former building, the teachers actually had a great "we're in this together" mindset - but I think I fit in with the staff a bit better. Most of the staff in my old school was young - mid-20's-early 30's - and the staff at my current school is a little bit older as am I. (Teaching was a later in life choice for me.)

    Anyway, more than you wanted to know I'm sure. :) People ask me about my former district a lot because it's the nearest big urban district, but I have mostly good things to say about it, and there are things I do miss. It was just the perfect storm of the wrong position in the wrong building at the wrong time.
     
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  17. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Enthusiast

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    Wow! That level of dysfunction would turn anyone away, I think. It’s great that you love your new position and it’s also great to hear your previous colleagues work with a new principal who has drastically improved the school.

    It the end, everything worked itself out, so at least you can be happy knowing that you work in a more supportive environment and in a position that is intrinsically rewarding, as well.

    I must say that I agree on a number of points made here. I love my current school not only for the pay, which is great, but because I get to work with incredible colleagues and like-minded people with a passion for teaching. I’m lucky in that regard in that I get the full package.

    Here’s hoping that your current school year continues to be awesome!
     
  18. kgquick118

    kgquick118 Rookie

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    So we are instructed to "teach from bell to bell", the principle here walks into my class with 2 minutes left in the class period and says " why aren't they doing anything?" I had just taught an entire lesson and they had just finished doing a worksheet. It was such a petty thing to do, but typical for this type of school.
     
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  19. vickilyn

    vickilyn Virtuoso

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    So if they had been doing an exit ticket all would have been well? I always knew they were good for something!
     
  20. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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    LOL We had "maximize instructional posters'' posted ALL over the school including the staff bathroom.
    [​IMG]

    Wish I was making it up.
    :roll:
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2018
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  21. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Enthusiast

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    Sep 8, 2018

    If your principal has time to check to see if teachers are teaching in the last two minutes of class just to ensure they are teaching bell to bell, then they need more hours of work as they are clearly not doing enough with the time they have currently.
     
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