has anyone sucessfully student taught without experince?

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by strummercohen, May 28, 2016.

  1. ChildWhisperer

    ChildWhisperer Devotee

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    May 29, 2016

    You can quote and reply in one post. It'll save you some time when replying :)
     
  2. strummercohen

    strummercohen Rookie

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    Thanks child whisper :)
     
  3. strummercohen

    strummercohen Rookie

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    Which responsibilities did you have when u volunteered in your mom's friends classroom before student teaching?
     
  4. ChildWhisperer

    ChildWhisperer Devotee

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    ^ you did it :clapping::clapping::clapping:
     
  5. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    The discussion here is also relevant to this thread.
     
  6. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

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    I have read all of the OP's threads on this subject, and I would like to make a post that basically replies to all of them, since they all ask the same thing. Not a criticism, but an observation.

    Since you are in a graduate program, you have been successful at the undergrad level even with the undiagnosed ADHD. This indicates that you have some strategies in place for learning with this challenge, so way to go. As for the depression you mentioned on one of the threads, find the right medication, follow your doctor's orders, and you will be just like a lot of other people leading a useful and productive life. Being behind in some of your courses would concern me, because if you rely on "do overs", you will really struggle in student teaching. I have watched my son work from sun up to a late bedtime just to get the amount of work completed on time during student teaching at the graduate level. I would be very concerned for you, staying focused and on track.

    You ask if other people have student taught without having classroom experience, and the answer is yes. Many of them are called alternate route candidates, and their "student teaching" is in the real world situation where it is sink or swim. As they are teaching full time, they are, in essence, taking full time courses to learn how to teach. They have a mentor teacher, who may or may not be highly invested in the AR's outcome. Amazingly, many are highly successful, indicating to me that it is possible to succeed as a new/learning teacher candidate despite lack of experience in the classroom.

    As for the grade level, when I lived through my son's ST experience, he spent part of the time with one grade, and the other part with another. Part was with elementary, and then followed by high school students. With that in mind, I would say that any classroom experience where you are demonstrating classroom management skills is virtually equal. If, on the other hand, your day care is to simply keep them from killing each other, with no structure, you could struggle. I am not sure why you are trying to become a para instead of a sub, but then, I am not from Boston.

    Finally, if Boston is so competitive in the job market, you may or may not need to relocate to land your first contracted job. If you come out of your grad program with high grades, including the ST, and lots of the professionals you work with are willing to write glowing letters of recommendation, you may be poised to do well in the job search. If your ST experience/grades are sub-par, and people seem reluctant to write LOR's for you, then you may seriously want to consider relocating to an area where the need for teachers is high, and the supply is low.

    You asked for our stories, so mine is both similar and different from others. I had done quite a bit of volunteer work in classrooms in my home district as my son was in school. When he was in fourth grade, I started subbing, which I did for a few years. Then family circumstances required me to become a full time caregiver for an Alzheimer's patient. Everything in my plan was put on hold. By the time I was free to consider getting back on track with my plan to go to grad school, I was hesitant to invest that time and money for what could be a relatively short career. I became an AR candidate and found a full time job based on two applications and one interview. I imagined I would teach science in MS, but ended up teaching biology in HS, where I had zero experience. To make this story shorter, let's just say I worked my behind off and earned my standard certificate. I also earned a M.Ed. in ESL along the way, earned certificates in elementary, all MS except math, and SPED.

    My story is unique because I came into teaching at the same time teachers around me were constantly talking about how long until retirement. Did you know that half of all new teachers will leave the profession within the first five years? Well, I'm still here. Would I go back and become a teacher through graduate school in hind sight? No. For me this worked, although the fact that I love science, have a ton of science courses, and continue to take courses just for fun factors into my decision.

    I would make a small recommendation, and not meant in any way as a major criticism. Be careful to not to substitute "U" for "you". Second, if you are going to use the letter "a" before a word that starts with a vowel, use "an" instead. An example: I am going to set up an experiment. I am sure it is my age, but I notice those things every time, so you can consider my observations or not.

    Good luck in your career path.
     
    Last edited: May 29, 2016
  7. ChildWhisperer

    ChildWhisperer Devotee

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    It's not your age. I notice these things ALL THE TIME. Spelling, grammar, punctuation, etc. I'm "only" 28. :)
     
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  8. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    I student taught in fourth. I taught third, then second, then third, then sixth, then second, then fourth, then third, and next year will be fourth again. Student teaching was 23 years ago.
     
  9. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

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    The text language when talking to other professionals always gets me! I try to ignore it, but if the OP is wanting to excel in her field, she may be able to stop the practice before it becomes a habit. I always try to nip a potential bad habit in the bud, because an established habit can be a bear to fix.
     
  10. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    I had experience teaching college before I student taught. There were plenty of differences between the two, along with some similarities.

    Most people I know who student taught had no teaching experience prior to student teaching.
     
  11. mckbearcat48

    mckbearcat48 Cohort

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    I only remember one person from my grad class that had experience that student taught. She was an outstanding English teacher at a Catholic HS and wanted to go into public schools. What did you teach in college? That is part of my end-game if I get there.
     
  12. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    I taught lower-level foreign language classes. University teaching isn't for me; I'm not about the "publish or perish" life.
     
  13. mckbearcat48

    mckbearcat48 Cohort

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    I did a couple guest lectures at both my undergrad school and my law school, and I enjoyed the teaching aspect, but from friends with their Ph. D. already...they echo your sentiments. I would love to teach law in education at the college level (making use of the JD), but most schools that offer the course want Ph. D. and JD.
     
  14. mrsammieb

    mrsammieb Devotee

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    You've done a lot of observing first right? You should be FINE! I had a similar experience when I was in school. I happened to be in a class with a lot of mom's who were going back to school. They had so much more experience than me, but I rocked it. And you will too!
     
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  15. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Phenom

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    I observed in 2 different classrooms (10 weeks each) before I student taught. I didn't get too much experience but it got me familiar with certain aspects of the classroom.
     
  16. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Here, student teaching is part of the Bachelor of Education program (a B.Ed is a requirement). The responsibilities and requirements of each student teaching placement increase with each placement; the start of the first placement is strictly observation and by the end of the final placement, the student teacher will have taken over most of the classroom instruction. Other than as a student, I had never stepped foot inside a classroom when I began student teaching.
     
  17. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    I was a business major undergrad and for my Masters in Ed and certification after having kids and volunteering on their classrooms. The more observations/volunteering/experience eith kids the better.

    I'm hosting a ST in the fall (my 7th ST). And I'm a bit concerned about her social/interpersonal skills. I'm kind of wanting to embrace her nerdy brilliance....with caution as its really all on me whether my kids succeed or not.
     
  18. strummercohen

    strummercohen Rookie

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  19. geoteacher

    geoteacher Habitué

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    In reading over this thread, it definitely appears that you are nervous about student teaching. As long as you have completed your observation hours before student teaching, you will have as much experience as most student teacher. I have hosted several - from traditional and nontraditional certification programs. If you go in willing to try different things with students and willing to learn from your mistakes, there is no reason that you will not be successful. Watch your cooperating teacher, learn from what he/she does, and then try some of those same techniques yourself!
     
  20. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    May 31, 2016



    Many of our education programs here are concurrent--the student is working towards their Bachelors degree and their Education degree at the same time. Programs that are stand-alone to earn a B.Ed after having a Bachelors degree still have 3 student teaching placements during the year, with increasing demands at each.

    1. I graduated with a B.A. (English) and a B.Ed with qualifications to teach K-Grade 6. I have since added qualifications up to Grade 10.
    2. Hours in a classroom are part of the program--This is what student teaching looks like at one of the universities we take student teachers from--over the course of 2 years, students complete all three student teaching placements:
    1st year students: Will attend once a week. There is NO expectation for independent teaching. Co-planning or co-teaching is encouraged. Student is to immerse themselves in the classroom environment building relationships with the students, getting to know the context, and learning the MANY pieces that go into our profession that do not involve independent teaching. There is no evaluation involved. It is a year of formative assessment. Students will present a learning portfolio at the end of the term, at which time the MT will write a formal conference report.
    2nd year students:
    Sept- December: Will attend twice a week until the last two weeks of November. A 2 week block at the end of November. Independent teaching (planning, assessment, etc) is expected with an evaluation during the 2 week block.
    Jan- April: Will attend ONCE a week for 6 weeks, then a 6 week block beginning in the middle of February until the end of March. Independent teaching (etc) is expected with another evaluation at the end of the block.

    3. Looking at how the student-teaching experiences progresses should answer this question.
    4. I took the first level of my Special Ed qualifications when I graduated; I took the other two levels (to become a Special Ed Specialist) once I was working.
     

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