Hard Lockdows

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Caesar753, Aug 31, 2017.

  1. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Phenom

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    Sep 2, 2017

    It's a serious drill. Not fun at all. We are contained to one area of the building, the gym. Yes, we really do seal ourselves in. The adults do it, not the kids. And we are also monitored by official teams who analyze our plan. All houses downwind also have free alert radios and shelter in place kits in their homes.
     
  2. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Enthusiast

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    Sep 2, 2017

    If there was an actual emergency, how long would you have to travel to the gym before the nerve agent reached you? If you sealed off the air in the gym and filled it with hundreds of people, have they calculated how long you could be in there before everyone suffocates?
     
  3. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Phenom

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    Well, . . . you know that when nerve gas weapons were put out of commission, they didn't just disappear. They had to do something with them. Check out this link.

    https://publicintelligence.net/us-chem-weapons/

    I'm just a few miles from the Bluegrass facility. My DH drives by it twice a day. We go by it anytime we have to go to the grocery. His school is closer than mine, but he is upwind and doesn't have as strict of a plan. We have 20-30 minutes of prep time, and it's 10 minute containment time before dissipation. They have leaks fairly often, but they are contained within the bunkers. The disposal facility is still being built.
     
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  4. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Fanatic

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    Sep 2, 2017

    Caesar,

    I think this is part of a larger problem with schools that needs to be addressed. As we know as educators and parents, the way a 3 year old sees the world and an 11 year old 5th grader is so different. Our schools and districts preach us to apply diversity and differentiation, then they ignore what they preach by mandating policies which are the same for 3 year olds and 11 year olds.

    Pre-schools should have a separate way to handle lock downs that deal with their sensitive nature and age. I would have them separate and not call them lock downs. I do believe strongly that if preschool teachers were given a say, they could come up with a safe and sensitive way to do lock downs. Too often it is administrators though that dictate a "one size fits all" approach. Until a more "preschool" friendly lock down is put into place, I agree that lock downs for preschoolers might be doing more harm than good.
     
  5. AmyMyNamey

    AmyMyNamey Comrade

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    Sep 2, 2017

    If your kid was this upset, I'm thinking they're going about the drills all wrong, maybe making them too intense. The teacher should not instill fear or try to stress the kids out, but keep them calm.

    Myself, because of the noise, I see kids being frightened by fire drills, but not lock down drills.
     
  6. ChildWhisperer

    ChildWhisperer Habitué

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    Sep 2, 2017

    Daycares do lockdown drills now so it starts with infants. Teachers put 3 babies in designated cribs (they have signs and wheels unlike other cribs) and lock themselves in the bathrooms. I don't remember what the toddlers do. But each age group has a procedure.
    I currently teach preschoolers in a public school that goes up to 6th grade. Whatever they do, we have to do as well.
    Soft lockdowns are "business as usual" except doors are locked and nobody can leave their classrooms.
    Hard lockdowns are locked doors, lights off, blinds closed, everyone hide in the bathroom & closet and be quiet.
    Like I said in a previous post, in the area I work in now, we have enough real lockdowns that we don't even do drills.. the kids are used to it. Teachers say "again?!" But better safe than sorry.
     
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  7. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Sep 2, 2017

    I am reasonably certain the my kid's teachers are not trying to stress the kids out.
     
  8. AmyMyNamey

    AmyMyNamey Comrade

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    Sep 3, 2017

    Yes, but what about the other kids? Ever seen them work each other up with violent fantasies? I have.

    Again, I've never seen a kid upset to such a degree by a lock down drill. But maybe my school is simply the exception.

    Hope the little guy has bounced back.
     
  9. Obadiah

    Obadiah Habitué

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    This is all scary, just plain scary. I'm much older than 3-years-old, and I'm becoming frightened just reading these posts.
     
  10. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Fanatic

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    I think it is helpful to remember that one of the safest places for elementary aged children is at school. The number of children seriously hurt or killed at an elementary school are far less than other places such as in an automobile or truck accident. Lockdown and fire drill practices may help our students be a bit safer at schools, but even without them elementary schools are still much safer than most places.
     
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  11. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    In your PP you didn't mention the other kids getting each other worked up. You said that the teachers "should not try to stress the kids out".

    And also, it's not awesome to imply that my kid is abnormal and/or that the school is some sort of monstrous place where the goal is to freak kids out as much as possible.

    This was a new experience for my kid. I'm sure it was scary to hear the announcement over the PA system. I'm sure it was strange and scary to be herded under the tables with the lights off. Fear seems like a not-unreasonable reaction to those events, especially given the age and experience of the kids involved. I just feel sad that my kid was scared. That's all.
     
  12. AmyMyNamey

    AmyMyNamey Comrade

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    Sep 4, 2017

    My friend, I was implying no such thing, or nothing more than the idea that your son was young and could be be upset in a manner I'm accustomed in witnessing in thousands of other young kids.

    Not everyone her is looking for a fight or trying to hurt someone. I am simply not built that way.

    Please do not take offense where none was ever intended. I am a friend, and of that you can be certain.
     
  13. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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    I have. What is your lockdown procedure? If kids are being told to get into a small area, blinds are shut, lights are off, and they absolutely cannot make a sound, that's enough to frighten a lot of kids. Whether they know why they're doing it or not, the change in routine and the seriousness of it can be scary.
     
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  14. beckyeduk8er

    beckyeduk8er Comrade

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    Sep 8, 2017

    readingrules12 and AlwaysAttend like this.

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