Guided Reading for 2nd grade

Discussion in 'Elementary Education Archives' started by jenglish97, Mar 20, 2006.

  1. jenglish97

    jenglish97 Devotee

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    Mar 20, 2006

    I went to a workshop on Guided Reading that we will be piloting next year in my district. I was wondering what kinds of techniques and strategies you use in your classroom for the Guided Reading Groups and the other groups that are at their desks.

    I will be working in an inclusion classroom. So should the regular education teacher take one group while the special education takes another group since they are suppose to be no more than 6 students in a group.

    I would like to start brainstorming ideas for next year for myself since I do not know whom I am going to be working with.

    Thanks for your help.
     
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  3. src1105teach

    src1105teach Rookie

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    Mar 21, 2006

    I make a contract for the stories my groups are reading. I have been using Reading-Z books with my groups. So when I make copies of the books I have a schedule for each group. For example:

    11:15-11:35
    Monday- Green
    Looking at the cover of the book make a prediction about what you are going to read. Why did you make that predition?
    Silently read the story
    Determine the author's message of the story.

    While my green group is working on their book exploration my next group might be doing the following:

    11:15-11:35
    Monday-Red
    Read with the teacher.
    After reading with the teacher, highlight (whatever skill I am working on during the week) long a words within the story.

    I make a schedule for each group. I have 3 groups working at the same time and I meet with them daily. So I have a scheduled time chart on the back of their readers. It seems like a lot of work but they have routines that they follow each week. So they understand not in interrupt my reading group. If you have 2 people in the room, you only have to make up 2 routines per day. I know that this sounds really hard but I love having the students work on something within the text that we are working on and that I am not just giving them busy work while I work with the other groups. We always have time to review the skills that they did during their routines and I check over them right there. So at the end I don't have a ton of grading. Hope this is helpful!
     
  4. AuburnTeach

    AuburnTeach Companion

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    Mar 21, 2006

    guided reading

    I begin the year by doing a running record with each child to determine his/her reading level. I use the Rigby PM Benchmark Assessment kit.

    Different companies use different leveling systems; the books in our book room are all leveled according to Fountas/Pennel. There are level correlation sites on the internet, so if I order from a company that doesn't use the F/P system, I can find the correlating F/P level.

    After I have a reading level for each child, I put them in groups of six or fewer based on reading levels. The groups are flexible and change often throughout the year.

    Each of my students has a browsing box. I found some great plastic baskets for 50 cents at a discount store. The kids put the books they've read in their guided reading groups in their browsing boxes; they read them for familiar reading at the beginning of their group and during silent reading time.

    I've collected a good supply of single copies of books at various levels, so at the beginning of the year I give each student three or four books a couple levels below their instructional levels to start their browsing boxes.

    Since you and another teacher will be in the classroom, I'd think you'd each take a group.

    My district is very fortunate to have two parapros who are trained to do guided reading. Our Title teacher also takes a group, so there are four adults trained in guided reading (including myself) in my room for 30 minutes every day; each teacher takes one group.

    We rotate groups every month. I have a 30 minute silent reading slot every day, so I can listen to each child read twice a week. I use information I glean from listening to children read, info provided by the teacher who's working with a group, and formal running records (every 9 weeks) to switch children to different groups or move a group to a new level.

    When I started doing guided reading, I had to do all the groups myself; I had four groups. The groups didn't match exactly (for instance, I had one group that had kids at levels A and B, one with D and F, etc.), but I couldn't do more than four groups.

    I scheduled an hour a day for guided reading and saw three groups a day for 20 mins. I saw the two lower groups every day, the next highest group M, W, F, and the lowest group Tues, Thurs. That was definitely not the best scenario, but at the time it was the best I could do...and it was a start :).

    Students who weren't working with me read independently for 10 mins, partner read for 10 mins, and did a center for 20 mins. The kids who didn't have guided reading (because of being in a higher group) did two centers.

    I spent a month teaching the kids how to do the centers before I started doing guided reading groups. I didn't have a teaching assistant or any parent volunteers to supervise/help with centers, so the kids had to be very independent.

    If you'd like to know more about the centers I did, I'd be happy to share that information...please PM me if interested. I have some books at school that have been very helpful in developing the centers; I can share the titles with you, if you'd like.

    Are you using a Guided Reading program (Wright Group, Rigby, etc.), or will you order books from various publishers? Just curious.

    I hope this helps. I'm excited to read about how other teachers run their groups, centers, etc. This is a great place to learn and exchange ideas. :)
     
  5. TXTCHR29

    TXTCHR29 Cohort

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    Mar 23, 2006

    Have you received the book Guided Reading by Fountas and Pinnell? This is an excellent resource for any techer who is just starting out in Guided Reading.
     
  6. jenglish97

    jenglish97 Devotee

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    Mar 24, 2006

    Thank you so much for your information. This is very helpful for a start. We are using a Guided Reading program from the presenter Martha Southall. It was presented through the BER. I am not exactly sure what materials or items we will be using yet. The principal and reading specialist have not told us yet. It is still up in the air.

    I think we will be ordering a variety of trade books, but like I said I do not know all the details yet. We shall see.
     
  7. Sally Evans

    Sally Evans Rookie

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    Jun 3, 2006

    Literacy Centers

    I was just reading through some connected posts to another one and saw this. If you are starting Guided Reading in the fall, you should take some time to carefully consider what the other kids are doing while you are meeting with small groups. It isn't hard to teach a group of 5-6 kids, it is hard to manage the other kids. We worked very hard on our centers, but our campus looked at different purchase options this year so we could have consistency with our centers next year. We thought this might cut down on the time we have to spend "training " the kids at the beginning of the school year.

    We finally agreed on a product from All Children Can Learn called Literacy Centers for Independent Practice.

    In addition to looking at these materials, you should read as much as you can from the books mentioned in previous posts. The Fountas and Pinnell book was our guide and we still go back to it often.

    Good luck!
     
  8. MissFrizzle

    MissFrizzle Virtuoso

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    Jun 3, 2006

    Silly question- but I am not teaching at the moment, so excuse me. In the beginning of the year, these assessments that you speak of .... are they just informal? does the school provide them? I am so overwhelmed just thinking about figuring out how to do this
     
  9. IndyJo

    IndyJo Companion

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    Jun 4, 2006

    Our school has the Rigby assessment provided for the teachers to use. We're also using DIBELS. We have - to accomodate five or six first-grade and second-grade classrooms - the assistant principal, reading recovery teachers, our literacy coach, and a building aide helping teachers to do these because they are so time consuming and plus the time it takes to assess the results of the child.
     
  10. Proud2BATeacher

    Proud2BATeacher Phenom

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    Jun 4, 2006

    We have to give our own Rigby tests by ourselves - no help. We share a Rigby kit between 2 to 3 teachers.
     
  11. MissFrizzle

    MissFrizzle Virtuoso

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    Jun 4, 2006

    ugggghhh Proud- I am so afraid of chaos... you must be an excellent planner though. How long does it take to assess your class?
     
  12. halpey1

    halpey1 Groupie

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    Jun 4, 2006

    Just a suggestion I got from a graduate course I took and implemented with tons of success... research shows that many, of not most of the "leveled reader" are not very rich in vocabulary and do not lend themselves to rich retelling, which is how we really teach comprehension.

    Anyway, this professor created this system where leveled books were alternated with a fairy/folk tale. So you would do a leveled book one week and a fairy/folk tale the next week. The kids LOVE this, as the fairy/folk tales are familiar and really lend themselves to some creative retelling (storyboards, shadow puppets, etc.). There are many versions of different fairy/folk tales out there and I was able to find super easy ones as well as more challenging ones for my advanced readers. Sometimes if the text was too hard for the really low readers, we would just do it as a shared reading piece and then do the retelling activity together. I have seen a great upswing in motivation to read, the kids just love the fairy/folk tales. :)
     
  13. Miss W

    Miss W Phenom

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    Jun 5, 2006

    The first week I do DRA's and DIBELs on each student. I know it's overkill, but we're required to do both. During this time I let the students explore the library and do beginning of the year activities. Then once a month I will do a running record on each student. If you rotate about 5 kids a week, then you can stay on track. I just take whatever reading book they're on at the time and use it for the RR. The first few weeks it's all about proceedure. Just teaching how and what GR is all about. Our district has a wonderful GR book room where we get sets of books (on level) to use. I also use the old basals that I've accumulated over the past two years.
    Everyone above has some wonderful ideas. You'll just have to plan what works for you.
     
  14. Sally Evans

    Sally Evans Rookie

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    We had parents (PTA volunteers/classroom volunteers) go through our leveled text collection and place a small highlighted mark after the first 100 words in each book in our collection. This made it soooo easy to do running records using any unseen text in the bookroom. It really makes my ongoing assessments a breeze!

    On another assessment note - we use Flynt - Cooter. It isn't the most accurate, but is quick, gives you a good ballpark starting level, and then you can start collecting your informal data on kids. As a general rule, we all try to have our assessments done in the first week of school. We have a great principal who assigns our reading specialists to cover our classrooms for one full day. You get as much done as you can that day and then you have to figure out the rest. The follow-up assessments are quick and are usually just done by pulling 1 or 2 students each day for a couple of weeks. Again, the real information comes from daily performance and transfer recognized in their reading and writing strategy use.

    There are so many great assessment tools out there - it just takes sticking with one long enough to make it work for you.
     
  15. Proud2BATeacher

    Proud2BATeacher Phenom

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    Jun 5, 2006

    We have to assess our students within the first couple weeks of school to get them in their reading groups. This is hard when you do not know the students, they don't know you and they have to learn a new classroom routine. The first grade teachers have a really hard time as their students are not used to working independently for more than 15-20 minutes and coming off of summer holidays...
     
  16. MandaNicole01

    MandaNicole01 Habitué

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    WOW! That's an awesome idea! Why didn't I think of that? Even if you just did one book per set that would really help out! I'm going to recruit some parents at the first of the year to start that project. Thanks for sharing!
     
  17. Miss W

    Miss W Phenom

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    I started typing a running record sheet for each GR set I checked out. I would then put a copy in the bag when I sent it back for the other teachers to use. Now they just have to make a copy for each student reading the book. You could have a parent, or even a student do this to help out. I'm a fast typer so it didn't bother me to do it.
     
  18. MandaNicole01

    MandaNicole01 Habitué

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    Jun 7, 2006

    Miss W,
    I've often thought of that... This past year I was split between two schools and didn't have time for that. But now that I'm at one school for next year, I'll try and do this...a few at a time. Or like you said, enlist some parents to help! I could also highlight one of the readers so the student would know when to stop reading. Yay! I love sharing ideas and brainstorming for next year!
     
  19. Miss W

    Miss W Phenom

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    Jun 8, 2006

    If you could enlist another teacher or teachers to help, you'd have the entire book room done in no time.
     
  20. Carla

    Carla Companion

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    Jun 8, 2006

    At my school we also use inclusion. I try to schedule my guided reading groups so that I see my students even though they are getting extra help from an inclusion teacher. This is what should be happening with a LD child anyways. Resource is meant to accelerate a child not be the sole instruction. I also have a lesson plan form of what my lesson should look like, depending on the level. This is very beneficial in planning.
     
  21. Miss W

    Miss W Phenom

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    I also copy those neat little lesson guides that come with the sets and put it in my GR planner. I have a seperate notebook for my GR groups. In my lesson plans under GR it simply says "See notebook for specific plans". I have several reasons why I copy the lesson guides. (1) I can put it in the section of plans for that group, (2) I like to highlight and write on it (what works, what doesn't work, and extra ideas), and (3) the original might get lost someday. The next time I get that set of books and they don't have a guide, I just make another copy and stick it in the bag.
     

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