Growth Mindset Lessons

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Ms.Holyoke, Jul 31, 2018.

  1. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Groupie

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    Does anyone have any growth mindset lessons/activity ideas that they would be willing to share? I was thinking of spending a day or part of a day on developing a growth mindset with my students. I'm looking for activities that would make this more interactive for them.
     
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  3. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    Are you familiar with Jo Boaler and the YouCubed website? She offers a lot of math-related growth mindset lessons and resources. She also mentions some great activities in her book, Mathematical Mindsets.
     
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  4. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

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    As Bella said, Youcubed is AMAZING.

    Here's the "Week of Inspirational Math" - which is what a lot of teachers will use for the first week of school to establish procedures, establish growth mindset, how to talk about math, etc...

    https://www.youcubed.org/week-inspirational-math/
     
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  5. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Phenom

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    I found a bunch of activities last year on Teachers Pay Teachers and Pinterest.
     
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  6. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    TONS on Pinterest. Should be more than a day- it’s a philosophy. There are great read alouds, poster and bb ideas, questioning strategies, the power of yet....weave into everything you do.
     
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  7. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Groupie

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    I was thinking of other things I would do like number talks, low floor high ceiling problems (whenever I can) and a "my favorite mistake" activity throughout the year. I also heard that it is a good idea to teach your students explicitly what a growth mindset is and how your brain can grow when you make a mistake, challenge yourself, etc. and I am thinking of designing a lesson around that early in the year.
     
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  8. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Groupie

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    I've started looking at Jo Boaler's activities and I liked them! I feel like I could pick 1-2 because most of them aren't tied to the standards for my grade. I might choose one that I really like for the first or second week of school.
     
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  9. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    I start my year with WIM tasks--they are my entire math program for the first 4 or 5 days. While they don't deal with new concepts that the students will be learning, they allow me to learn a lot about my students mathematically and for them to learn about what math will be like for them in my class--connecting, collaborating, problem-solving, communicating and justifying their mathematical thinking. I've found that students often refer back to the activities later in the year as they consolidate new learning--"Oh, this is like that activity we did when we..."

    For me, growth mindset is part of the classroom culture; it's important to foster an environment where students feel comfortable making mistakes. This is tough at times because so much of the focus in education (particularly in math) is on getting the "right" answer. While that is, of course, important, the process is even more important. I love the "favourite mistake" activity--I use it often.

    (I'm attending a 3-day workshop this week and today the facilitator shared a fun book that touches on growth mindset as one of the many lessons--Wolf by Becky Bloom. One sentence summary--a wolf learns to read in spite of his struggles and the attitudes of those around him.)
     
  10. svassillion

    svassillion Companion

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    My professional and student goals last year were all about increasing growth mindset with my Ks. I would recommend introducing it in the first week, but constantly reinforcing it all year so it doesn't just drop off at some point (I'm very guilty of starting something new in the fall and not going back to it after the first month). One mini-lesson I did was on GM language. I had phrases printed and laminated that were either said by someone with a growth mindset or a fixed mindset. Each student was given a phrase and took turns placing it on our poster as either growth or fixed. It helped them recognize words that would encourage them and words that would hinder them. This is best done after direct instruction on growth mindset and fixed mindset.
     
  11. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    I was just catching up on Twitter--there are some great quotes and articles when you search #growthmindset
     
  12. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Groupie

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    I've been thinking about this a lot because it seems like the focus of math has always been getting the right answer. In my student teaching, every time I asked the kids to come to the board to go over the Do Now, they wanted me to check that their work was correct. It was really frustrating and they clearly did not want to make mistakes, especially in front of the whole class. I'm trying to think of a proactive way to address this challenge.

    I was reading Jo Boaler for one of my courses and I know that she said that we shouldn't take points off for mistakes on tests, or we should give kids who make mistakes a higher score. I feel like this would not align with my philosophy and I'm sure my school wouldn't be happy with it either. But I do want an environment where students do not feel stressed about making mistakes and know that they can learn from them.
     
  13. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    On tests that evaluate understanding of concepts, almost all of my questions are worth several marks, only one of which is for the correct answer. The process of getting to the answer is more important than the answer itself (and those students who refuse to show their work do suffer). I also always include application questions on my tests; in these problems, the students are successful when they are able to apply mathematical concepts and communicate the strategies.

    Outside of lessons (which are usually quite short), my students spend much of their math period working collaboratively. Having the opportunity to discuss their learning helps them to see that everyone doesn't always "get it" right away and working with someone else enables them to struggle through challenges in a safe way.
     
  14. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Groupie

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    ^
    Mrs.C, do you ever grade work that the kids do collaboratively? In my student teaching, my mentor often had me grade classwork and exit tickets for correctness. It gave me good feedback on how the kids were doing, but I was grading for 2 hours every night. I also want to have my kids work collaboratively this year, but I am not sure how to assess assignments that they did together.
     
  15. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    I assess learning skills when the kids work collaboratively, but don't grade the work. That's the time for them to learn and practice. The higher-order thinking questions that are part of tests are always similar to ones that they have worked on collaboratively in class. Sometimes, when giving students an assessment task, I give them the opportunity to talk with a partner for 3 or 4 minutes about how they would go about solving the problem. They can't write anything down, but can bounce some ideas off of each other.
     
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  16. Rockguykev

    Rockguykev Connoisseur

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    Waaay more than a day but www.stepitup2thrive.org has a tremendous Growth Mindset curriculum that is totally free.
     
  17. heatherberm

    heatherberm Comrade

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    I don't remember what grade level you're, in but Class Dojo has a series of videos starring Mojo that I watched with my 3rd and 4th graders last year. (https://ideas.classdojo.com/b/growth-mindset) They introduced all the basic concepts - struggling is part of learning, your brain is making connections even when you're making mistakes, just because you can't do it right away doesn't mean you can't ever do it, etc. My kids loved them and we got a lot of great conversation out of them. As someone mentioned above, however, it really can't be a one day thing or it won't stick. We spent a couple of weeks really focusing on it with the videos and some picture books (The Most Magnificent Thing, Your Fantastic Elastic Brain, and Rosie Revere, Engineer) but it was also a part of our conversation almost daily all year. I think it made a really big difference and the kids really took to encouraging each other not to give up when struggling.
     
    Last edited: Aug 4, 2018
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  18. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Aficionado

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    Absolutely! Teachers have been teaching & modeling growth mindsets for years. It comes down to how we respond when students are frustrated. We can take those moments to model growth mindset thinking and respond in a way that shows students a more productive frame of mind. I often say, "Wow! I'm so glad you're here, because we are at school to learn this new concept. It's fine that you don't already know it, because I'm going to teach you and help you."
     
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  19. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    I think that would be overkill, which is what happens in education quite often. People get carried away. Giving kids who make mistakes higher scores??
    No, we still want them to arrive at the right answer, we just want to make sure they don't get frustrated, don't give up and understand that the thinking process is very important.
    So in math, a problem could be worth 3 points, so a kid who did a good job, but then made a small mistake and did not get the right answer, and gets only 2 points is fair. OR in English (or any other subject) you have a short answer and it's worth 3 points, the kid that did not include everything, losing 1 point is fair.

    Why would we reward mediocracy? If I'm in college and I'm proud that after all the studying I got all the correct answers got a lower score than someone who made all sorts of mistakes, THAT would discourage me and I wouldn't really care about getting things right. Or I wouldn't value the grading system and lose all respect for all of it.
     
  20. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    It is hard to convince kids that mistakes are not something to shut you down in a system where nothing but perfection indicates a character flaw. Not smart enough, not paying attention enough, not trying hard enough, etc.
     
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  21. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    I agree with that, but let's not reward them extra for making mistakes.

    I see a lot of handholding of our kids. There are some teachers I know (personally) who will give a kid 1 point for showing up. Well, for me that's attendance. You're not getting a point to show up to class and sit there and breath and do nothing. I mean I commend you for showing up, and everything, but you have to earn my points.
    Maybe I'm a little too hardcore, bit I also teach high schoolers, kids who have been passed along without actually knowing the material. And then all they do is complain that they have to copy something from the board. And complain, complain, complain and feel entitled to a good grade.
    And when they fail " your class is the only class I'm failing" as if it's my fault.
     
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