Getting certification in another state

Discussion in 'General Education' started by VeniVidiVici, Jan 5, 2018.

  1. VeniVidiVici

    VeniVidiVici New Member

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    Jan 5, 2018

    I'm on my way to getting certified in NY (will finish next spring with initial certification in SS secondary education if it goes well). However, I live in NYC and it's been a struggle supporting myself even with a full time job working overtime and taking off semesters. I don't know if I will have a very good chance at finding a job in the Long Island area (including Brooklyn and Queens) when I graduate and someone I know that is moving close to Charlotte offered to let me stay for a while when I graduate.

    I could get my initial certification in May 2019 in NY. Is it possible to get reciprocity in NC with just an initial certification? How long does it usually take to get the license? Could I apply for jobs in NC when working on getting my license changed over? Also, how is the job market there for someone new to teaching?

    Also, I have the same questions about TX. If anyone could lead me to any information or tell me about their personal experience or just give any advice that would be great. I'd really appreciate it.
     
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  3. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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    Jan 5, 2018

    Why not look in other parts of NY first? If you have a NY license it's pretty much GOLDEN in other states because of the requirements. Usually you can apply for some temporary license which allows you to work while finishing requirements, if needed. Basically you can get any job you want in any red state... but there's a reason for that. You need to seriously look into these places before you consider moving. I moved to AZ and taught. I got a job in the snap of a fingers, but there was a reason there's a shortage. I only stayed for two years and then moved back.
    :D

    Check out OLAS, if you haven't already, which allows you to apply to district openings ALL OVER the state.
     
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  4. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Jan 5, 2018

    NC in the past few years was booming and the market was good for teachers. Even though a state may have reciprocity, there are often a few hoops to jump through-an additional test section, a workshop, etc. do your research NOW by contacting the DOE in the states in which you are interested.
     
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  5. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Jan 5, 2018

    If you search "___ teacher licensure out of state", where the blank is filled by the state you're interested in, the search should bring up at least a few pages that are clearly part of the state department of education website (that is, they'll end with something like de.gov or doe.gov) and that will spell out the requirements for someone in your situation. For most states, as Leaborb has noted, there's a temporary license that can make you eligible for employment while you work on whatever teacher requirements the state won't see fit to waive for you. (There's usually something.) If you've taken any kind of basic-skills test, that is likely to be accepted; if the states you're considering are, like North Carolina, states that use Praxis, you could just bite the bullet and take Praxis while you're finishing up your schooling.
     
  6. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    Jan 5, 2018

    This was quite awhile ago when I graduated in 2010, so it's possible things have changed, but I did know a few people who went to teach in NC. We were in OH, which was an extremely saturated job market at the time and NC was pretty much begging for teachers (keep in mind there is a reason for that- the salary is low).

    In OH we had complete reciprocity with NC- no additional classes or tests needed or anything like that. Due to this, my classmates and I thought we could apply for jobs and then pay/do the paperwork to get the actual license if we were hired. A few of us applied to quite a few places and never heard anything. One of my classmates even went as far as making a 14 hour drive (one way) down to NC to attend a job fair in person. You would think driving that far and showing up in person would show you're pretty serious about moving. Nope. No one would give her the time of day because she wasn't certified in NC, even when she had her OH license in hand and documentation that showed reciprocity. They told her to apply once she had her NC license in hand, which also must be why none of the rest of us ever heard anything despite them supposedly being desperate for teachers.

    She ended up going home and doing that right away, and it took about 4 weeks to come. After that, she just started applying online and got multiple offers for phone interviews within the next couple of days, and was hired over the phone within the week. Moral of the story is, if you're serious about moving, you need to have your license in hand.
     
  7. VeniVidiVici

    VeniVidiVici New Member

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    Jan 7, 2018

    I will definitely take this advice and look into other places before moving. Is there any good place to find information on how schools are in other states? Can I ask what was bad about Arizona?

    I have a love/hate relationship with Queens/BK/LI, but I do not think I'd really want to move elsewhere in NY unless I absolutely had to for work. I don't really like upstate (it's gorgeous though and has great hiking), but NYC is way too overpopulated. I'm not really sure where I'm going with this things I love/hate about NY so I'm going to stop typing. There is no place like home especially when you can't get good pizza elsewhere.


    I really appreciate all the advice in this thread. I definitely will contact the other state's DOE now to see if I can find out how to get a license (or temporary license) in another state and see what I would have to do.
     
  8. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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    Jan 8, 2018

    I use this website for looking at school rankings
    https://www.niche.com/k12/search/best-places-to-teach/s/arizona/
    And then Glass Door so you can get a feel for individual schools.
    It's a little outdated, but gives you a starting point:
    https://edexcellence.net/publications/how-strong-are-us-teacher-unions.html?v=publication

    From my experience, if you can teach in a Blue / Collective Bargaining state, GO FOR IT! You want to avoid Right to Work States as much as you can, because you'll notice a huge difference coming from NY. I had culture shock when I taught in AZ for the first time. Seriously I walked into my classroom and was like "this is it?'' I had NOTHING! I came to realize that states like AZ spend bupkis on education and you definitely notice it especially if you're from a North Eastern state where we actually value education. Another thing you'll notice (coming from NY) is the serious lack of a union and there's no tenure. This means you are CONSTANTLY on an annual contract and won't know if you'll have a job for the next year... you just have to wait around and hope to be issued a contract in the spring. And the problem is that it NEVER ends! Every year in the school could be your last. You have no protections so if someone doesn't like you, you're gone. That happened to a friend of mine. She didn't get her due process, the principal just called her and said "I need you to get your belongings and come to my office.'' She never came. I had to help pack up her classroom and brought her stuff to her on the last day of school. There was a backstory, but if she had union representation and tenure I don't think it would have gone down like that.
    I'm sure some districts are better than others, but be very wary of these fundamental issues. It doesn't matter how "great'' a school seems, without any sort of protection, you can get screwed over! You'll also never make any money nor will you rise up the salary schedule in the way you would in NY. I'll give you another example: when my second districts couldn't find subs, they would "split out'' the kids to all of the other teacher's rooms so at any given point you could have an extra ten (or more) students in your classroom. And we were a K-8 school so there was the possibility that any AND ALL of them could be in your room!!! And it happened ALL THE TIME!!! :mad::mad::mad:I've since returned to NY and told that story and some teachers have said "Oh no that couldn't happen here or the union would have a huge fit!"
    Yeah, we didn't have one to really fight for us. I even told the story during an interview and the admin just laughed and said "I'll have to share that with my staff.'' They think it's funny, but for teachers in AZ it is a cruel reality. When they fired my friend, they didn't even get a sub so the kids were split out the last two months of school. They never had a consistent schedule and pretty much lost any instruction after the state test. We had an instructional coach who taught fourth grade, but they NEVER put him back in the classroom to take over. The schools are run by idiots out there and it shows!
    Actually now that I write these words, I'm seriously reconsidering moving back to AZ. I think I'll just try and find a job in NY. @VeniVidiVici
    :rofl:
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2018
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  9. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Connoisseur

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    Jan 8, 2018

    Seriously, please stay in NY. It’s not worth putting up with all of that. You will make great money and have representation. Why would you give that up?
     
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  10. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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    It's true and even as a new, non-tenured teacher, you still have better protections than in RTW states. A classmate of mine who is a first year teacher had a serious incident happen in her class and the principal was gunning for her head. She had to have a meeting -- a union rep was there to represent her -- and she ended up getting to keep her job.
    I just have to find a job. My resume and cover letter are all beefed up and I'm getting updated references from my professors for spring 2018 openings.
    Some ''pluses'' of AZ though are: they really need good teachers out there and the poor kids really appreciate them. I loved being able to teach ELLS as they were the most respectful and hard working students I've ever worked with. Their parents were uber supportive as well. But yeah, the cons definitely weigh heavy.
    When all they can do to entice candidates is say "We have good weather'' or "We're close to California,'' that's not really enough.
     

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