Getting an interview out of state

Discussion in 'General Education' started by mathematicalanomaly, Feb 8, 2018.

  1. mathematicalanomaly

    mathematicalanomaly Rookie

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2017
    Messages:
    38
    Likes Received:
    13

    Feb 8, 2018

    .
     
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2018
  2.  
  3. vickilyn

    vickilyn Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2014
    Messages:
    6,930
    Likes Received:
    1,626

    Feb 8, 2018

    Have you passed those states teacher exams, checked on reciprocity, or set things in motion to acquire the required certificates in those states? You will shell out money for all of these things, but it will probably make a difference in whether or not you are considered seriously. Know going in that you have a ton of competition for those elementary positions. Recommend getting all tests and acquisitions of teaching certificates in order, then applying. If solid interest, make the trip, perhaps after a Skype interview. Nothing says I want the job more than making yourself available to interview in person.

    Went through this with my son, so know more than a little about what may tip the scales in your favor. Yes, he was hired out of state, and sealed the deal by going there for 5 days to interview. He had his choice of three offers at the end of that time.
     
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2018
    futuremathsprof likes this.
  4. SandyCastles

    SandyCastles Companion

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2008
    Messages:
    223
    Likes Received:
    1

    Feb 8, 2018

    I moved from NC to WA in the summer of 2017.
    My new district had a job fair, it is actually coming up again in a couple of weeks. They allowed me to do an online interview and I had an offer letter later on that day. It was nice to be hired early, so we knew exactly where to look for a house and it gave me time to work on certification. I did have to take the WA certification tests because they did not accept my Praxis, but they gave me a year to do so.
    For my interview, there was a panel of admin, and they asked me the typical questions. I believe it was recorded. They were able to interview me right through the Applitrak system- it has a video interview component. I think if you are seriously considering coming out here, you can start looking at districts now. There is somewhat of a teacher shortage, at least in the area I am living in, so my guess is you would not have an issue finding a position. Especially near the military base, teachers will already know or will be finding out soon if they will be relocating this summer, thus creating openings districts will want to fill.
     
  5. anon55

    anon55 Comrade

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2014
    Messages:
    463
    Likes Received:
    146

    Feb 8, 2018

    I think your first step is to get the licenses for the states you want to teach in. Think of it from the interviewer's perspective: why would you hire someone from out of state with no license (which if you hire them, they may back out and not even get), vs. someone in person who has the proper license and lives locally.

    Considering you're moving from across the country, I think you have to go above and beyond to prove you're serious. First, get the license, second be willing to fly out for a 2nd/final interview.
     
  6. mathematicalanomaly

    mathematicalanomaly Rookie

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2017
    Messages:
    38
    Likes Received:
    13

    Feb 10, 2018

    Hi there! Would you be able to PM me (is that a thing on this site?) more details about your area?

    My top district has a job fair in April but I certainly can’t afford to fly across the country for a job I may not even get.
    My salary in NC qualifies me for food stamps y’all. I’m broke.
     
    SandyCastles likes this.
  7. mathematicalanomaly

    mathematicalanomaly Rookie

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2017
    Messages:
    38
    Likes Received:
    13

    Feb 10, 2018

    Everyone I’ve talked to that has been hired out of state just begins the process to get that states license after they’re hired.

    I can’t afford to get licensed in 5 different states (that’s how many I’m applying to) because of all the tests that are required, that would be thousands of dollars.

    I’ve looked into reciprocity and getting licensed after being hired is not a big deal.
     
  8. mathematicalanomaly

    mathematicalanomaly Rookie

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2017
    Messages:
    38
    Likes Received:
    13

    Feb 10, 2018

    How did he afford to take 5 days off of work and fly across the country as a teacher??

    I do not have a spring break this year. The plane tickets to the areas I’m looking at are like $600+ round trip. I don’t have that kind of money just laying around.

    I work two jobs right now just to make ends meet.. I have a little bit of savings but will need that to actually move!
     
  9. jadorelafrance

    jadorelafrance Cohort

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2015
    Messages:
    580
    Likes Received:
    223

    Feb 10, 2018

    I applied to a job out of state and got an interview before being certified. I had to fly out there, and personally, I’m glad I did so I could get a better idea of the school, environment, people, etc. I got the job and began the cert transfer right a way. It took a while though. And I applied to a state that is supposedly over saturated with teachers, however I’m in a harder to fill content area. It can be done but I’d say be at least willing to fly out there if it’s a school you can see yourself working at and/or pays well.

    And for me, I interviewed in June when my school was out for the summer and my current school was still in session, so I didn’t have to take time off. I also stayed with someone.
     
  10. vickilyn

    vickilyn Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2014
    Messages:
    6,930
    Likes Received:
    1,626

    Feb 10, 2018

    Save your personal days, realize that you may be interviewing through the summer, put aside money for airfare. Sorry, just being a good interviewer won't help if you can't find time to get to the interview to wow them.
     
    Been There and bella84 like this.
  11. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2011
    Messages:
    5,524
    Likes Received:
    453

    Feb 10, 2018

    I disagree about having to fly out for interviews. I've been hired over the phone twice. Once was actually my current job. I was already local, but happened to be out of town when they called to schedule the interview, so they did a phone interview instead. From the interviewer's perspective, Skype seems like it's just as good as being there in person. Any disadvantage is all on the interviewee's side, since you don't get to see the actual building or anything like that. Personally, I'm not sure how much information you really get from that. I accepted my first job over the phone having never stepped foot in this state, and it ended being the best job I've ever had.

    I've also been to many interviews where it was immediately obvious that I didn't really have a chance (there was an internal candidate) or once I heard a little more about the job it was immediately obvious I had no interest in that specific job. For example, I interviewed for a couple of "resource" positions that I found out in the interview were actually self-contained EBD positions. I also interviewed for what was listed as "primary teacher" and ended up being a 2nd year Kinder class comprised completely of kids with academic and behavior needs with no models. I'd hate to pay hundreds of dollars to fly across the country and find that out. If the school seemed really great and they were absolutely insistent, I might pay to fly out as a "final step" kind of thing where they'd already determined I was the top candidate and the flying out was more to sign paperwork and things like that.

    I do agree that if applying out of state, you need to have that state's license in hand. That shows just as much commitment to actually moving there, but is significantly cheaper. Pick one or two states that you don't need to take additional tests for. Many states have reciprocity where all you have to do is pay for the license. When I was first looking, I was applying to states supposedly desperate for teachers and getting no bites, even though my state's license was clearly completely reciprocal with them. My friend actually drove 14 hours to a job fair in NC, where they were supposedly desperate for people, and you'd think driving that far shows you're serious, and they wouldn't give her the time of day. As soon as she got home she applied for her NC license and got 20 interview calls in ONE WEEK. She had a job within the week, from a phone interview.

    I did end up getting hired without having my license first, but the only reason is that my principal at the time wasn't great with details/paperwork and just assumed if I was applying I already had the license. She later told me she was glad she didn't know that, because she would have never hired me. I went and applied for my license the next day, thinking it was no big deal since my home state's license had come in 3-4 weeks. This state's license took over 6 months and I didn't get it until December of my first year of teaching. Thankfully, my principal/district knew the department of ed was slow and let me continue working. Had they been sticklers, they could have paid me a paraprofessional salary for the entire first half of that year since I had no license in hand. I wouldn't wish that stress on anyone!
     
    Master Pre-K likes this.
  12. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2007
    Messages:
    14,383
    Likes Received:
    2,347

    Feb 10, 2018

    I am with those who believe that you need to have your state license first. It may not be a requirement, and you will certainly hear from people who didn't need a license in the state they were applying in. Even so, I think that it will be helpful. Some states have a very long licensing process, and some states require a full, clear license in hand before you can even step foot inside a classroom. If you wait to apply for a license and then your application won't get processed until October or something, the school is in a pickle. Why give them a reason to not hire you? Make it easy for them to want you.
     
    anon55 likes this.
  13. SandyCastles

    SandyCastles Companion

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2008
    Messages:
    223
    Likes Received:
    1

    Feb 10, 2018

    I am sure there is a way to message-- but it is not letting me start a convo with you. I have no idea why or how to fix it! Maybe you could try to start one with me? I have a bunch typed out for ya!


     
  14. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2013
    Messages:
    3,197
    Likes Received:
    1,047

    Feb 11, 2018

    You'll need to have a license, as others have said.

    Normally the process to apply involves filling out an application through the district's website.

    Look to see if there are job fairs you can attend too. If you can take a day or two off, that could be the most effective way to talk to multiple districts in a short time. Also, many places will be hiring in the summer.
     
  15. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Aficionado

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2007
    Messages:
    3,801
    Likes Received:
    684

    Feb 13, 2018

    There are plenty of high paying teaching jobs here in CA. My district in particular starts out newbies (fresh out of college with no experience) at 58k. Teachers with experience can start out at 68k (again, this is specific to my district; however, I'm certain that nearby districts are similar).

    If you're planning to come here, though, I'd recommend looking into taking subject matter exams ASAP: https://www.ctc.ca.gov/credentials/out-of-state-ged
     
    futuremathsprof likes this.
  16. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2013
    Messages:
    3,197
    Likes Received:
    1,047

    Feb 13, 2018

    Oh man... You almost have me convinced!
     
  17. mathematicalanomaly

    mathematicalanomaly Rookie

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2017
    Messages:
    38
    Likes Received:
    13

    Mar 1, 2018

    Okay I can definitely get at least my WA and OR license started, I had no idea it could take up to 6 months in some states. Here in NC I was licensed within 2 weeks after graduation, that is CRAZY to me.

    I definitely can not "take a day or two off" to fly from NC to WA/OR/CA for an interview for a position I don't even know much about...that's honestly crazy that someone would even do that in my opinion! I would never waste my money on that... I will be moving this summer regardless of if I have a job offer or not to the WA or OR area, so I will hopefully be able to interview all of August while I nanny or wait tables (both of which I have extensive experience with and will be fine financially).

    Also feel like some commenters didn't even read my whole post, because I already talked about applying through Applitrack for individual districts and how I wouldn't be able to attend job fairs in person..
     
  18. vickilyn

    vickilyn Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2014
    Messages:
    6,930
    Likes Received:
    1,626

    Mar 1, 2018

    First, you don't fly out for one interview, but schedule multiple interviews while in the area. How things are done in NC is not the "set in stone standard" that most other states follow.

    The Pacific Northwest is a destination desired by many, so expect stiff competition.

    Best of luck
     
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2018
  19. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Maven

    Joined:
    May 18, 2007
    Messages:
    5,985
    Likes Received:
    124

    Mar 16, 2018

    Ditto on the bird in hand worth more than saying, "I'm gonna get my cert. as soon as I can." I left IL to teach in CA and they had testing nearby before I moved. Once I was hired, they gave me a year to finish getting my credential completed. Get in touch with some AtoZ members in the area and get specific guidelines for applying in all the states that you are willing to teach. Yes sometimes things are a lot simpler where you are and totally different somewhere else. Dare I say, getting a driver's license is a nightmare in CA that makes DMV a four-letter word.

    Do you have any relatives or friends in those states?
     
  20. Heliax

    Heliax Rookie

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2018
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0

    Mar 17, 2018

    I've just started the process myself, with an extra layer of complexity - trying to get an interview from out of country.

    I've had my credentials reviewed and I'm now waiting for my initial one-year teaching certificate to come through for teaching in TX (Math 4-8 and 7-12 certified).

    Ditto to one of the OP's questions - what is some advice for getting interviews/noticed without being able to physically attend job fairs and schools in person?
     
  21. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Maven

    Joined:
    May 18, 2007
    Messages:
    5,985
    Likes Received:
    124

    Mar 17, 2018

    People feel more comfortable with locals and/or people who are highly recommended. You want to avoid being seen as an outsider.

    Go out there for a few weeks. Get a p.o box, because now you can use the post office street address, and that looks more professional. Then open a bank account. Maybe a small store credit card.

    Then when you move out this summer, you will have an easier time getting a job & apt. Once you are established as a resident, you’ll probably get more responses.

    Don’t underestimate the power of networking. And yes, nepotism. Ask around. Start building or re-building relationships. If you have a distant aunt or cousin out there, call ‘em up. My brother-in-law helped me. It was a win-win proposition. Their school district needed teachers and I needed a job.
     
    Been There likes this.

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. Ms.Holyoke,
  2. MrsC,
  3. ally06,
  4. MissScrimmage,
  5. jadorelafrance
Total: 377 (members: 6, guests: 272, robots: 99)
test