Future Teacher

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Craig Ockerman, Apr 9, 2018.

  1. Craig Ockerman

    Craig Ockerman New Member

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    Apr 9, 2018

    I am almost done with my Elementary Certification, two semesters until I graduate. I also just retired from the military and am looking for any pointers as a future teacher.
     
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  3. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Fanatic

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    Apr 9, 2018

    Welcome to AtoZ Craig!

    Here are some tips:

    1) Don’t take comments made by students personally. Their prefrontal cortexes are still developing, so they don’t think about what they say before they say it.

    2) Always have a seating chart. This helps with attendance and with keeping students accountable. Also, don’t take roll by asking students who’s there. It’s highly inefficient. Just take roll when the students are silently reading or working on an anticipatory set or something.

    3) Only have a small handful of rules that students can easily remember. They won’t remember many rules and it will be too much of a hassle.

    4) Always enforce the rules and be consistent! The students will get confused if you only enforce the rules sometimes.

    5). Don’t ever reprove students in front of their peers because they will resent you for it. Never raise your voice unless absolutely necessary and don’t shout at students when they are talkative.

    6) Have a station in the classroom for extra supplies, pencils, and a homework tray so students know where to turn things in and where they can get supplies if they need them.

    Hopefully, this helps.
     
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  4. Craig Ockerman

    Craig Ockerman New Member

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    Apr 9, 2018

    Thank you, this helps a lot, if I can have a good game plan even before I start I will be that much further a head, this is some great advice. I am a little older going into the teaching profession and hopefully a lot more understanding and patient than in my younger days. I really like #1 that is something I will endeavor to remember.
     
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  5. Been There

    Been There Habitué

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    Apr 9, 2018

    This is the time to visit the classrooms of as many exemplary teachers as possible. Take note of everything they do in all areas: classroom management/discipline, organization, lesson plans, lesson presentation. Pay special attention to their demeanor and the amount of verbiage (quality not quantity) they use to get the job done. I have a personal bias towards veteran (not military) teachers who use highly effective old-school methods. If possible, talk to those teachers about any questions you might have regarding your observations. For most of us, it's much easier to retrieve a visual memory of a relevant experience when it is urgently needed, than to retrieve a suggestion from a written list.

    Thank for your military service.
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2018
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  6. Craig Ockerman

    Craig Ockerman New Member

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    Thank you also, I have been trying to get in and see those veteran teachers. I am trying to find the teaching style that will work for me and my students. I have been taking parts and pieces of different teaching styles, that I think will work for my personality and my teaching style and I hope that by the time I graduate that I will have a good base, I know that I will have to adapt, and tweak it even after I start teaching, but that is the nature of most things.
     
  7. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    Apr 9, 2018

    One thing I've noticed with veterans who move into the classroom is that their classroom management tends to go extreme; either extreme disciplinarian or extremely lax. As you are developing your own style, that may just be something you want to keep in the back of your mind.
     
  8. Craig Ockerman

    Craig Ockerman New Member

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    Apr 11, 2018

    Thanks, I have been able to visit both types of classrooms, one where the teacher was almost militant in his teaching and expectations of his students, the class was well behaved but I did not like the atmosphere, the other class I observed the teacher was well over 6' and I thought that his class would be very orderly and structured but he was very lax in controlling his classroom and it was too chaotic for me. I am striving for something in between the two. I do not want my students to fear me, like I feared some of my elementary teachers, when I was growing up, but I do want them to respect me, as a teacher and mentor.
     
  9. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

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    Apr 12, 2018

    I'd also recommend reading the research, various journals and also there are many professional books for teachers. Here are some books I've recently read and would recommend. I've starred the ones I would especially recommend.

    Abeles, Vicki; Grace Rubenstein. Beyond Measure: Rescuing an Overscheduled, Overtested, Underestimated Generation. N.Y.: Simon and Schuster, 2015

    * Boaler, Jo. Mathematical Mindsets: Unleashing Students’ Potential through Creative Math, Inspiring Messages and Innovative Teaching. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2016

    Borba, Michele. UnSelfie: Why Empathetic Kids Succeed in Our All-About-Me World. N.Y.: Touchstone, 2016

    * Kohn, Alfie. Punished by Rewards: The Trouble with Gold Stars, Incentive Plans, A’s Praise, and other Bribes. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co., 1993 (I don't know that I'd take things as far as Kohn does, but I agree with his summary of the research. Personally, I do think that rules should have consistent, appropriate, and fair penalties. Sometimes rewards can add fun, but I have problems with the overall use of rewards. I'm especially concerned about giving misbehaved students extra incentive rewards (a common practice, often recommended by principals), and much research is cautioning the use of sugar as a reward (because it backfires; it basically rewires the brain).

    * Levine, Mel. A Mind at a Time. NY: Simon and Schuster, 2002

    Lewin, Walter and Warren Goldstein. For the Love of Physics: From the End of the Rainbow to the Edge of Time—A Journey through the Wonders of Physics. NY: Free Press, 2011

    Louv, Richard. Last Child in the Woods: Saving Our Children from Nature-Deficit Disorder. Chapel Hill, North Carolina: Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill, 2008 (revised edition)

    Mason, C. Nicole. Born Bright: A Young Girl’s Journey from Nothing to Something in America. N.Y.: St. Martin’s Press, 2016

    * Miller, Donalyn. The Book Whisperer: Awakening the Inner Reader in Every Child. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2009 (No teacher can teach a child to read. The best we can do is teach how to read; if the student doesn't practice, it won't stick. Same as taking piano lessons. Without practice, a student won't become a pianist).

    Pillay, Srini. Tinker Dabble Doodle Try. N.Y.: Ballantine Books, 2017

    * Siegel, Daniel J. and Tina Payne Bryson. No-Drama Discipline: The Whole-Brain Way to Calm the Chaos and Nurture Your Child's Developing Mind. New York: Bantam, 2014. E-book ISBN is 978-0-345-54805-4 (Best book on discipline I've ever read)!
     
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