Functional words

Discussion in 'Special Education Archives' started by Giggles1100, Aug 7, 2006.

  1. Giggles1100

    Giggles1100 Comrade

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    Aug 7, 2006

    I know I should know what this is but after a 10 year Hiatus I am a little lost at certain phrases, I have found many of the phrases I used 10 years ago are called something else now. So what are functional words? Is that like Bathroom, yes, no etc?
     
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  3. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Aug 8, 2006

    For special education, apparently the answer is yes: see http://www.usu.edu/teachall/text/ disable/programs/functwords.htm.

    In syntax, "function words" is a cover term for pronouns, prepositions, conjunctions, and the like: the words that, unlike nouns, verbs, adverbs, and adjectives, don't have specific independent meaning (content) but that serve as the glue that holds a sentence together.
     
  4. teresaglass

    teresaglass Groupie

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    Aug 8, 2006

    Try the Fry Reading books or spelling books. they will give you functional words. Terry G.
     
  5. ellen_a

    ellen_a Groupie

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    Aug 8, 2006

    Yes, functional words include survival words/phrases like bathroom, exit, etc. Typically, they are taught as sight words should be tailored (as much as possible) to specific students. It is my belief that you can expand functional words to work words, menu/restaurant words, grocery words, etc--the words that are actually FUNCTIONAL to that specifc child's life.

    Example: One of my students came to me with an IEP goal to learn x-number of functional sight words; in his old classroom, they were focusing on words like arm, leg, pig, etc. (predictable CVC words, yes, but how functional are they? how often do YOU read the word pig or leg?). Instead, I had the student focus on words that I knew he would use--survival signs (exit, men, women, stop, danger, poison, etc.), menu words because he ate out with family and was doing some restaurant prevocational work (chicken, fish, milk, etc.), and specific words for our classroom to increase his independence there (such as his peers' names, words on our regular schedule, etc.). I did this kind of individualization for each student.

    Try looking at the Edmark series of functional curriculum--I know they have sight words, restaurant words, grocery words, office/work words, etc. I LOVE THEM!!!!
     
  6. teresaglass

    teresaglass Groupie

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    Aug 8, 2006

    Remedia Publications has a series of Functional words Books called Restarant Words, Survival Words, etc. they are also helpful. Terry G.
     
  7. ellen_a

    ellen_a Groupie

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    Aug 8, 2006

    I also like Remedia. I prefer Edmark because of the initial identification sheet--they put the word, surrounded by distractor words, on a sheet, but they vary all the fonts so the student is REALLY generalizing the sight word. But I used both publications in my classroom. :D
     
  8. Giggles1100

    Giggles1100 Comrade

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    Aug 8, 2006

    I found a set of Edmark and Remedia books in my filing cabinet at school today. full of sight words for cooking, restraunt, grocery and everyday functioning, Yay! thanks
     

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