Full-Inclusion

Discussion in 'General Education' started by ssgirl11, Mar 7, 2018.

  1. ssgirl11

    ssgirl11 Rookie

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    Mar 7, 2018

    So there is talk at my school about implementing a full-inclusion setup next year.

    Here is some info about my school, currently:
    It is a middle school with co-taught science and social studies (If you couldn't tell from my username, I am a social studies teacher.) So, I have IEP kids, but the severe ones are not in my class. Math and language arts are pullout, and have an intervention specialist teaching a small group. The students who are non-verbal, ED, etc. are in their own class all day for every subject, including life skills.

    Next year, there is talk that ALL students (with the exception of the non-verbal students) will be fully included in our classes next year, and the pullout classes will be changed to co-teach. Since intervention specialists will be co-teaching math and language arts, they will no longer be with science and social studies, so I will be on my own.

    My question is: has anyone experienced their school making the switch to full-inclusion? What strategies can I use to make these students successful?
     
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  3. Been There

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    Mar 7, 2018

    If you remain in teaching long enough, you’ll probably get to experience a variety of different mainstreaming models. They all have inherent strengths and weaknesses and each seems to have its own fan base - full-inclusion is no exception. As you’ll undoubtedly discover, for it to be successful, the transition to full-inclusion should include adequate preparation and training of all personnel and students who will be affected. Your excellent question should be the center of discussion at your next staff meeting or PD day. As with most successful school initiatives, this requires a team approach best led by none other than your school principal. Here’s some info that you can pass on to begin the dialogue.
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2018
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  4. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Habitué

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    Mar 8, 2018

    Honestly, it seems like an easy way for the school to save money while seeming like they are "helping" students.
     
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  5. Been There

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    My exact same thoughts. Despite the academic and social benefits for some special ed. students, the time and effort that you'll have to devote to them will necessitate adjusting your priorities/availability to your other students. Problems often arise when special needs students are placed in a full-inclusion classroom, but may require a more restrictive environment to be successful in school. These inevitable consequences of full-inclusion should be openly discussed beforehand to avoid any surprises.
     
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  6. Backroads

    Backroads Fanatic

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    Mar 9, 2018

    I do think it's strange when full-inclusion is considered best by default. By considering it as such, you stop thinking about the students' needs.
     
  7. ssgirl11

    ssgirl11 Rookie

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    Mar 11, 2018

    Thanks for the advice! I'm not necessarily thrilled about making the move to full-inclusion, I tend to agree that it's a ploy to save money, but I didn't want to say anything in the OP because I didn't want to stir up controversy. My concern first and foremost is the success of my students, no matter who happens to be placed in my class, so I will do anything I can to reach this goal!
     
  8. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Mar 11, 2018

    Full-inclusion doesn't allow for least restrictive environment. Some kids can't function in large classes or even medium size classes. They need education away from the crowd and at a level that works for them so that they can progress academically, socially, and behaviorally. Some students can be included for some classes and not others.
     
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  9. ssgirl11

    ssgirl11 Rookie

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    Mar 11, 2018

    :agreed:
     
  10. FourSquare

    FourSquare Fanatic

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    Mar 11, 2018

    Strategy #1: Read the IEPs. You'd think that's an automatic thing, but not necessarily.

    Strategy #2: Get some lower leveled texts related to your content areas.

    Strategy #3: Find time once a week to incorporate small group instruction. One group for your lower students with or without IEPs...one group for enriching your highest students with or without IEPs. Some kids really just need that 15-20 min in front of a teacher.
     
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  11. geoteacher

    geoteacher Habitué

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    Mar 11, 2018

    We are full inclusion and have been for sometime. Luckily, I always have an aide in the hour with the neediest students. I do look at IEPs, and I modify expectations on all work, but the students are not exempted from much. I also give the aide quite a bit of latitude with how she approaches assignments with the students. Since she is with them much more of the day, we discuss things that she thinks might work.
     
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  12. Backroads

    Backroads Fanatic

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    Mar 12, 2018

    This sounds great.

    Though I have heard from people of IEP kids at full-inclusion schools... some of them really do fight to get their kids out of the full-inclusion classroom because their kid is floundering there.
     
  13. ssgirl11

    ssgirl11 Rookie

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    Mar 13, 2018

    Thank you, everyone for your replies. I just wanted to provide an update: as you probably know, word spreads like wildfire, so it was coming out that our school was making the switch to full-inclusion next year. As it turns out, there will some changes, but science and social studies will continue to have a co-teacher, so it makes me feel better to have some support, no matter who is in my class! Whew!! :rolleyes:
     
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  14. Been There

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    Mar 13, 2018

    What a pleasant surprise! The powers that be actually realized that science and social studies present special challenges due to the difficulty students face with reading comprehension.
     
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