Formatting information about U.S. States.

Discussion in 'General Education' started by MysteryMan, Feb 3, 2018.

  1. MysteryMan

    MysteryMan New Member

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    Feb 3, 2018

    Hello
    I teach about the states America.
    I start my class off with a brief history lesson. Quick bullet points.

    Then I reword an article, so my students can better comprehend it.
    They are middle school students but they have an English level of around a 3rd grader.

    So this

    -> then becomes this


    I am want to explain how these states are today for anyone that has never been to them before. Hopefully in a way that follows the format I shared.

    Something I have floating around are

    Today New York is home to some of the…
    It is famous for....

    I need ideas! Thanks to anyone that helps!
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2018
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  3. viola_x_wittrockiana

    viola_x_wittrockiana Comrade

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    Feb 3, 2018

    Before you worry too much about format, you need to check your facts. The Dutch people are not from Sweden; they are from the Netherlands. Amsterdam is the capitol city of the Netherlands, so it makes sense that they would call their city New Amsterdam. It's also somewhat disrespectful to refer to specific Native tribes as Native Americans. Doing that would be like teaching Korean history and calling the people Asians. It's not factually incorrect, but it is imprecise. Your last sentence makes better sense as, "George Washington was sworn in as president for the first time in New York." (Washington's second inauguration was in Pennsylvania.)

    For format, I suggest adding the origin of the state's name and major landmarks/monuments. For example, the American side of Niagara Falls is in New York.
     
  4. MysteryMan

    MysteryMan New Member

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    Feb 3, 2018

    Okay. Just to let you know, that was a rough copy, and I have yet to finalize it...
    I welcome more ideas!
     
  5. MysteryMan

    MysteryMan New Member

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    Feb 16, 2018

    bump
     
    Teacher234 likes this.
  6. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Feb 18, 2018

    Google 'United States information for third graders'
     
  7. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Fanatic

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    Feb 18, 2018

    While I agree with a number of things you said, you comment about referring to Koreans as Asian is ridiculous. “Asian” is a general term for people of Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, Malaysian, Korean, and Middle Eastern descent.

    According to the Oxford dictionary, an Asian person is defined as:

    “A native of Asia or a person of Asian descent.”

    Therefore, a Korean, who is both a native of Asia and a person of Asian descent, is classified as an Asian, by definition. Please stop with the PC nonsense.
     
  8. viola_x_wittrockiana

    viola_x_wittrockiana Comrade

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    Feb 18, 2018

    It's not PC nonsense; it's purely academic to use precise language, especially in cases where being imprecise leads to misunderstanding. In the OP's case, he's teaching about one or a few specific tribes. Because he's teaching state by state and not a general overview, it's appropriate to be specific. The Yup'ik, Hopi, and Micmac peoples lived very differently despite falling under the same umbrella term. The way the OP had abridged the text suggests that Native Americans lived only in New York, or that the peoples living in New York were called exclusively Native Americans, which is part of what I sought to correct.

    Did I contradict that? "It's not factually incorrect, but it is imprecise." My context for the example was specifically Korean history, not Asian general or regional history. It'd be weird to be teaching post-colonial US history and refer to citizens as North Americans. Not exactly false, but it's a strange choice when you're not referring to Canadians/Mexicans/Guatemalans etc. as well.

    It is a bit offensive to unnecessarily generalize about any group when you know you are referring to subgroups and not the whole. It's an affront to logic if nothing else.
     
  9. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Fanatic

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    Feb 18, 2018

    So by that reasoning, it is offensive to classify the French, British, Irish, and Germans as Europeans?
     
  10. vickilyn

    vickilyn Virtuoso

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    Feb 19, 2018

    I would suggest that, for once, a teacher visit TPT and buy the product that teaches most correctly what OP is trying to create on his own. OP is struggling, and it is possible that the work has already been done, perhaps quite well, by someone else who is willing to sell the results of their work for a reasonable price. I'm not a TPT fan, over all, but this may be an instance where the work has been done for this grade level masterfully. Maybe not - I didn't do any searches to find out. I just think it might be worth a look instead of recreating the wheel.
     

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